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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
    Posts
    2,436

    Default Re: Does this look like a Buckfast queen?

    Thanks for the replies. That queen is gone...so no matter now

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    SOMERSET, ENGLAND
    Posts
    377

    Default Re: Does this look like a Buckfast queen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Vance G View Post
    THere are people breeding bees of lineages going back to Brother Adams bees.
    http://perso.fundp.ac.be/~jvandyck/homage/elver/

    Some other old Buckfast lines.http://www.buckfast.biz/

    http://perso.fundp.ac.be/~jvandyck/h...d_CD_2010.html

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Richardson, TX, USA
    Posts
    375

    Default Re: Does this look like a Buckfast queen?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauri View Post
    Yup, performance is worth more than a name. After overwintering about 60 hives successfully this year I have to say, the daughters of the Glenn inseminated Carniolan queen I bought in 2011 are the shining stars in my yard. Daughters from a swarm I collected in 2011 also are performing very well. BeeWeavers single daughter queen looks fabulous, but I will see how hot this second generation is before grafting too many of them. I ordered 5 more Beeweaver queens to be delivered late April though. I did like them and they really get to work.

    The different strains, what ever they may be, really have different traits. It is obvious when you can see the hive conditions side by side when they have all had the same management.
    I also have some comments about overwintering prep and management, but will make that another thread at another time. Those I did lose I know exactly why and will share that insight with you. (It was not mites)

    This next month I will be evaluating which queens I will be grafting from this year. When you tended them last summer and they are overwintered, you have a great feel for performance and positive traits. When I open some hives I just think "whoa!" Those are already on my list
    Lauri,

    So how were the daughters of the Buckfast Beeweaver queen? Were they hot? Do you recommend using the Buckfast Beeweaver queen for a breeder queen?

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
    Posts
    2,436

    Default Re: Does this look like a Buckfast queen?

    Quote Originally Posted by RichardsonTX View Post
    Lauri,

    So how were the daughters of the Buckfast Beeweaver queen? Were they hot? Do you recommend using the Buckfast Beeweaver queen for a breeder queen?
    I had no daughters, only the five I ordered for that spring.

    You can't judge a line just from a couple queens, but they were wayyyy too hot for my taste.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Sweden
    Posts
    30

    Default Re: Does this look like a Buckfast queen?

    Since this poped up. Buckfast queens today are queens bred fro Rev Adams linage, keeping a controled mating and pedigree. Buckfast are more a method to have good, healthy, honey production bees than specifik " look like this". Usually like a brown italian, sometimes darker, sometimes lighter but colour is not a production criteria... Temper is. The only specisl with Adam was that he spend time to mix in good thing from different races more than working within one specifik race. Today some Swedish Buckfast breeders starts to integrate VSH from both imported US-stock and in the same time do selection in the breeder queens we have. But keeping the production high and varroa low...It will take a while.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Castle Rock, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    1,404

    Default Re: Does this look like a Buckfast queen?

    I'd rear queens from RWeaver Buckfast in a heartbeat - especially since you are right there in Texas already. Many of them - RWeaver Buckfast - are (have been) quite gentle. There have always been a few "mavericks".

    I spoke with Richard last fall. They had made a concerted effort to deal with a small number of "aggressive" complaints in 2014. One was mine. After refreshing the line, & re-visiting drone saturation, they had few if any verifiable complaints in 2015.

    Rearing ANY queens in AHB country, like Texas, is going to be a gamble - just be prepared to deal with it.
    Last edited by Colobee; 04-17-2016 at 04:41 PM.
    After 40 years of beekeeping, I've come to realize that the bees can fix most of my mistakes.

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