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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,642

    Default nectar and pollen bound

    I made 4 new splits out of 2 hives to accommodate the newly hatched queen bees.
    The foragers bringing in too much pollen and nectar to fill up the cells too fast. The new
    queens are not ready to lay yet. How do I stop them from doing that? Is there a way
    to expand the nest more so they new queen will have room to lay after her mating flight
    in 2 weeks?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Evanston, Wyoming
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: nectar and pollen bound

    Nubee so take my suggestion with teaspoon of salt.
    If you add a super and rotate filled frames from bottom to new super. This should give area to pull new comb, and provide area for queen to lay. I would rotate two or three frames in a ten frame hive. Maybe harvest and replace comb rather than rotate.
    In top bar, harvest a couple frames of honey.
    Good luck, watch the sodium.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,641

    Default Re: nectar and pollen bound

    You don't have to move frames. Just add a super. The bees will move the nectar or honey once the queens are ready to lay eggs.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,326

    Default Re: nectar and pollen bound

    Quote Originally Posted by johng View Post
    You don't have to move frames. Just add a super. The bees will move the nectar or honey once the queens are ready to lay eggs.
    Depending on the location of the full frames in the bottom box the addition of another box may or not work. Plugged out hives in March in NorCal should be expected with weather like has been issued us the last three months. Sounds like the extra box or empty frames in the bottom are a day late and a dollar short. We have pulled up to 10 frames out of hives in the last month to reduce congestion ( double deeps) If you do the same it would be wise to save the frames if possible because the glory days of a strong honey flow will be ancient history come about 6 weeks from now unless we get a large quantity some much needed rain. (6-8 inches in the next two months) unlikely The classical Norcal drought year feast followed by famine is going to hit the unprepared very hard if the will to feed and the bucks to do so is not preset in the minds of our areas beekeepers. At this point it looks like another $60 bucks worth of feed till 2014 almonds per hive. Thank God the price of sucrose from ML has dripped 22% since last year.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,299

    Default Re: nectar and pollen bound

    >The classical Norcal drought year feast followed by famine is going to hit the unprepared very hard if the will to feed and the bucks to do so is not preset in the minds of our areas beekeepers.<<

    I see it exactly the same way. Keith should have a bumper year selling sub from July on !
    Lets hope the sugar prices stay down.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,642

    Default Re: nectar and pollen bound

    It is all depended on location. Where you set your bees within its food source. I heard borage grow all summer long until
    winter for the bees. So I planted a half backyard for that purpose in case of a drought. Then I heard bees like sunflowers
    for the pollen and nectar. I planted those as well. Then goldenrod in the Fall, I planted 2 rows of that too. They are growing
    nicely now. Not to mention the different varieties of cucumbers and canola flowers. We have big acres of gardens by other
    growers here. These are consider backyard garden but in acres--2 to 3. And don't forget the pumpkins too. We have lots of
    those here as well. It seems everybody has its own favorite flowers to grow in their own backyard here.
    If all goes well, the farmers have fields of sunflowers, blackberry, strawberry, corn, watermelon, pumpkin, and other veggies as well. The location of my hives are close to a nursery with lots of crape myrtles too. All summer til fall they are close to a long creek with constant fresh water supply. So I heard that beekeeping is location, location and location specific.
    I kept mine there all summer last year and they are honey bound. Only that I set them on an ant hill. This year will be different
    with the grease up hive stand from here.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,925

    Default Re: nectar and pollen bound

    If there is somewhere to store the nectar the bees will clear a space for the queen to lay.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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