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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,620

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    It makes for real hard times raising cells as well. I have always assumed its the pollen, though, and not the nectar but I am not sure it makes much difference. We have seen a lot of it this year but haven't seen the resulting problems. I assume when a lot of other stuff is blooming that they don't pay much attention to it. The bumblebees are thick on it but only an occassional honeybee.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    28,274

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Could bee Jim. I'm not sure.
    Mark Berninghausen
    The answers are the end. The questions are the journey. Journey on.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    10,137

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    then it turned cold. i may have spread the brood a little bit too much,
    Now maybe you can see the risk of checkerboarding in the north country.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    10,137

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Yellow Jasmine nectar is toxic to bees.
    I am surprised that bees haven't evolved to where they wouldn't touch it.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,905

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    Now maybe you can see the risk of checkerboarding in the north country.
    in it's true form ace, walt's checkerboarding for nectar management does not involve any manipulation to the broodnest, so in this sense i deviated.

    truth is, i was too late getting to this one before it exploded with brood.

    i debated whether or not to leave that medium of brood alone and just add a super of comb over it. but since i'm still in the trial and error (mostly error) mode i wanted to try a little bit of opening the broodnest. (not disturbing the nicely established nest in the deep was my insurance policy)

    i think the reason walt's methods are not as appropriate in northern climes has more to do with the fact that most are overwintering in double deeps plus a super or two.

    using just a single deep with a super of honey to overwinter here in the south results in the broodnest already being in the bottom box in late winter, (unless your are late like i was with this one).
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Monkton, MD
    Posts
    39

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Question for Jim: you are raising queens already in SD? Isn't it too cold? And do you have drones available for the queens to mate with? I live in MD, and I am dying to get going on queen rearing, but can't, realistically,until May when when the drones will be mature enough to mate with. What is you secret?

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,703

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Per post #14, Jim Lyon (and the jasmine, and the queens) are in Texas at this time. Here's an earlier post where Jim also brought this up:
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...xas#post837245

    .
    Last edited by Rader Sidetrack; 03-24-2013 at 10:42 AM. Reason: found the post (#14) I was looking for
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,901

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Acebird, the day the bees evolve to not collect Yellow Jasmine will be followed closely by the day they evolve to remove all mites from the hive. I really hope that both of these come true. John

  9. #29

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by Rader Sidetrack View Post
    I believe that Jim Lyon (and the jasmine, and the queens) is in Texas at this time.
    To refine it a bit more....I believe that Jim is in Texas and the yellow jasmine is in bloom there but doesn't seem to be an issue for him this season.
    Mark is in SC, the yellow jasmine is in bloom there too....and he is experiencing some losses...small losses, I'd imagine, much as we see here.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  10. #30

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruthz View Post
    Question for Jim: you are raising queens already in SD?
    To answer for Jim....his hives and queen rearing are presently in Texas. He moves his hives a bit.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    10,137

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelsemium_sempervirens

    wikipedia says it is toxic to the brood not the adult bee.

    Wishes can come true...
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,995

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Sorry to hear your problems in SC Mark. I know its been dang cool down south this year. The jet stream is dipping all the way into Georgia. Which consequently turned it into very nice splitting weather last week.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,703

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    wikipedia says it is toxic to the brood not the adult bee. Wishes can come true...
    Or not ....

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Yellow Jasmine nectar is toxic to bees. Dead bees on the bottom boards.
    Are you saying Mark is wrong?

    Wikipedia is a useful reference, but its contributors are whomever wishes to contribute. Just like Beesource! Have you ever encountered a misinformed poster here?


    [UPDATE] Oh, this is perfect timing! I just read the Wikipedia link that Ace posted, and guess what it actually says?
    All parts of this plant contain the toxic strychnine-related alkaloidsgelsemine and gelseminine and should not be consumed.[5] The sap may cause skin irritation in sensitive individuals. Children, mistaking this flower for honeysuckle, have been poisoned by sucking the nectar from the flower.[6]The nectar is also toxic to honeybees,[7] and causes brood death when gathered by the bees.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gelsemium_sempervirens
    Last edited by Rader Sidetrack; 03-24-2013 at 11:31 AM. Reason: update to include Wikipedia quote
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    St. Albans, Vermont
    Posts
    5,585

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    i think the reason walt's methods are not as appropriate in northern climes has more to do with the fact that most are overwintering in double deeps plus a super or two.
    I think the reason is that we don't have what Walt calls a honey dome above the active broodnest. Unless the beekeeper left on too much honey, our clusters are up against the inner cover in the spring, not below a super of honey that can be checker-boarded.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,905

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    that makes sense michael, thanks for the reply.

    down in these parts most of the long time beekeepers run a single deep for brood, and try to leave one medium or shallow super of honey on top for winter, so that's what i've been doing.

    most of my hives had a nearly full medium of honey and the equivilent of 4-6 frames of honey in the deep by the first frost last fall. all but the one colony i mentioned above stayed clustered in the deep all winter. it appeared as though they were moving honey down from the supers as they needed it.

    i can see that the weather makes a big difference as to how much honey is left in the spring. last year, the flows came early and there was still a lot of honey in the supers when the nectar started coming in, a solid dome in some cases. this year the flows are coming late and the supers are almost empty, with only a few frames to alternate or checkerboard.

    basically what i did was weigh the hives last november, and weigh them again in january. honey frames from the supers of the heaviest hives in january were swapped with empty frames of comb from the supers of the lightest hives, and the frames were alternated honey/empty in all of the supers.

    thus no honey dome, and plenty of room for upward expansion. now if it would only warm up!
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    10,137

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    I think the reason is that we don't have what Walt calls a honey dome above the active broodnest. Unless the beekeeper left on too much honey, our clusters are up against the inner cover in the spring, not below a super of honey that can be checker-boarded.
    This has been said more than once and I am thankful that you repeated it. I personally have left too much honey and they still drill a hole to the inner cover. They just leave a lot behind on the sides. Maybe they use that honey on the side when they expand back downward because believe you me they are on a mission.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  17. #37

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Unless the beekeeper left on too much honey, our clusters are up against the inner cover in the spring, not below a super of honey that can be checker-boarded.
    I don't believe this is a North vs South thing. Mine are also, invariably, at the top of the hive by the end of winter. I used to use a medium over a deep for overwintering but now many of mine are double deeps. It doesn't make any difference....they're still waiting for me at the top on the first inspection.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,905

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    interesting dan. only one of my twelve was 'brooding' in the top medium, and that was because they ran out of room for brood in the deep. they will be gettting a third medium super soon.

    i did have some bees in the top boxes in the other eleven from time to time, but they were just getting the honey out and moving it down.

    i guess i'm lucky to have them in the bottom to start with, and just add supers as needed.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  19. #39

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    SP….either you have a Midas touch….or my bees aren't frugal. All of mine went into winter with their supers full plus some honey in the brood box. Every deep/medium doesn’t have a drop of extra honey. In the double deeps I occasionally find one or two frames with uncapped honey. I started feeding pretty hard…2:1…. over a month ago.
    I was talking to a beekeeping friend last night. She has a couple of hundred hives and she was out feeding. She said she hoped we’d get some nectar soon. I told her I was convinced that we were getting nectar (I’m seeing some new comb) but that the bees were consuming it as quickly as it was coming in.
    It could be that my mongrel bees have too much Italian in them. I’ve been getting some Carniolans though, and even they are living on the edge.
    For all that complaining….they are booming and look great.
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,703

    Default Re: SC Beekeeping Blues

    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    I told her I was convinced that we were getting nectar (I’m seeing some new comb) but that the bees were consuming it as quickly as it was coming in.
    Dan, you also said that you have been feeding 2:1 for more than a month. So what is it about the appearance of new comb that leads you to believe that it is a sign of nectar coming in?

    Or, to put it another way, I'm interested in how to distinguish new comb as an indicator of the availability of nectar vs syrup.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

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