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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    bridgewater , nova scotia
    Posts
    666

    Default cleaning bees from deadout

    How can i get the dead bees out of their cells without damaging the comb ? i thought about a shopvac with the brush on the end ?
    they are a bit stuck in the cells and a bee brush doesn't take them out and tapping them on them ground only breaks the comb .

    I am getting packages and didn't want them to have to do a lot of work once installed

    Ben

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Huntington ,VT, USA
    Posts
    256

    Default Re: cleaning bees from deadout

    I had moderate success last year with a shop vac and brush going back and forth gently.
    I also had some success with blowing a bit of compressed air across the frame with a slight angle toward the frame face.....but that was tricky to dial in enough pressure to pop them free but not so much as to tear the comb apart.
    Ultimately I just got the bulk of easy ones out and followed everyone's advice to let the bees take care of the one "tucked in"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Branson, MO
    Posts
    573

    Default Re: cleaning bees from deadout

    Ever watch Outlaw Joesy Wales?
    What did the old grandma do when they got to hers sons abandoned house?
    Started cleaning

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Pepperell, MA.
    Posts
    3,741

    Default Re: cleaning bees from deadout

    I don't worry about it all that much. Just pulled apart a dead out (which was alive until two weeks ago...uggh). I yank the frames and tap them against the side of the box. Unless I have a damaged frame or really bad comb, it all gets put back together and the new bees do the cleaning for me.
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,038

    Default Re: cleaning bees from deadout

    I hold the frame so one side of the comb is facing down and then lightly tap the top bar and or bottom bar with the back of the hive tool and most just fall out. Repeat for the other side. I didn't worry about getting them all out.
    I wonder how many would get pulled out if you threw a box of them on top of another hive for a couple of days.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

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