Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,401

    Default Disposition of late double-grafted queen larvae

    Recently, one of my breeder nucs has been trying to swarm. Two 5-frame stacked nuc boxes, with every frame 80% brood, several with started swarm cells on their bottom edges. So, while grafting from these frames I moved some of the swarm cell larvae to cell cups. I've watched those larvae most quickly become quite large, while the bees haven't elongated the wax portion of their cells much at all. I expect, by today, those cells will be sealed, with a good reserve of RJ, but not a very large cell size. This is in contrast to cells, immediately adjacent, whose transplanted larvae were much younger, their RJ reserves (on being sealed), were only slightly deeper (filling most of the entire cell cup, vs only about 2/3), yet the wax portion of their cells are nearly always much larger than these later transplanted queen larvae. I have, however, observed that their cocoons are very nearly always the same size. The larger cells simply have a larger space between the queen cocoon and the wax tip of the cell.

    I have done this several times in the past, always with basically the same results, as above. Usually these older, transplanted larvae come from rogue cells that are built inside cell builder colonies on combs donated from breeder queen colonies. They always seem to make excellent queens.

    We've had fairly good moisture, recently, giving us a good Spring build-up from wild flowers. Even when feeding, I rarely see so much brood per bee population as most hives have now. Especially with evening temperatures staying near 50F, it has been superb queen rearing conditions.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,695

    Default Re: Disposition of late double-grafted queen larvae

    You grafted queen larva out of naturally built queen cells into regular commercial queen cups? Interesting, keep the updates coming. I'm curious how they turn out.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
    Posts
    5,401

    Default Re: Disposition of late double-grafted queen larvae

    I've been doing it now, a few, every so often for several years. Despite that the cells almost always look very small, the queens produced this way have always been very nice size and become very productive mated/laying queens.

    One other observation, if the larvae are too advanced (very large), they are more likely to be aborted. I suspect they are too delicate, and are traumatized/injured in the move. Perhaps a larger grafting tool could be used in those cases, providing better support for those larger larvae during their move. A normal grafting tool is more like a spear for those larger larvae, than they are a support during those moves.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads