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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Santa Fe, NM
    Posts
    674

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Well now that all those issues have been clarified, what's that saying the barber uses....Neeeeext......
    "Tradition becomes our security, and when the mind is secure it is in decay".....Krishnamurti

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    I'm sorry, but it isn't.

    Quote Originally Posted by Javin007 View Post
    1.) 3 Hives with queens that are likely from the same genetic pool most certainly is a tiny gene pool.
    These hives are share territory with hundreds of possible nearby hives. There is not a tiny gene pool and using the inbreeding word is entirely inappropriate.


    Quote Originally Posted by Javin007 View Post
    2.) But WILL most certainly if no others are available.
    There are others available.


    Quote Originally Posted by Javin007 View Post
    I've seen it, as have about a billion other bee keepers.
    Really?


    Quote Originally Posted by Javin007 View Post
    3.) ALL feral populations of bees are "kept bees."
    No one is keeping them, they survive on their own, they are feral.
    feral


    1. Wild, untamed, especially of domesticated animals having returned to the wild.

    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Clintwood VA USA
    Posts
    56

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    I don't see how you could have a virgin queen this early. If you do I doubt there are any drones around for her to mate with. I am in the South West part of Va and I could be wrong but the earliest we have swarms here are late March and I rarely see drones until then. I wish you good luck!!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Bath, Maine, United States
    Posts
    1,142

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Javin007,
    Right or wrong, polite works. You have been here for less than a month. Beekeeping is not combat.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Stafford, VA
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Quote Originally Posted by Saltybee View Post
    Javin007,
    Right or wrong, polite works. You have been here for less than a month. Beekeeping is not combat.
    Sorry, but I do get spun up when someone snarkily tells me I'm wrong, then insists on it, when I'm very clearly not. I've tried to drop it. How about we leave it at that?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Florida
    Posts
    1,256

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Quote Originally Posted by Javin007 View Post
    Sorry, but I do get spun up when someone snarkily tells me I'm wrong, then insists on it, when I'm very clearly not. I've tried to drop it. How about we leave it at that?
    I'm no expert, but my research leads me to believe that feral bee populations in many parts of the country are in better shape than you fear.

    MIchael Bush says:
    The first assumption is that the feral bees have all but died out. I have not found this to be true. I see a lot of feral bees and I see more every year.
    When I joined a local bee club, I was surprised to learn how many small-scale beekeepers had hives in the little coastal city where I live. I think it's reasonable to assume that the genetics of their bees are fairly diverse. Since Drone Congregation Areas (where queens mate) draw drones from many square miles, and since the queen mates with many drones, it seems unlikely to me that an open-mated queen would not have genetics from many sources.

    Finally, I've been reading lately about the bee breeding done by such experts as Kirk Webster, and about how they go to a lot of trouble to find isolated areas for their drone hives and mating nucs. If it were easy to limit the queen's genetics to the lines these breeders are working with, then they wouldn't go to so much trouble, or so it seems to me.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon Parker View Post
    Shar, I don't believe in luck, but I hope you succeed. Keep asking questions and keep trying. Experience is something you don't get until just after you needed it.
    Thank you and I do learn from asking questions. Like they say in the bee meetings, everyone is good at what they do, I just need to figure out what it is I'm doing wrong....

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    I'm hoping for the best....I listen to all and love the advice and the diversity of it all. Thanks everyone for helping me with my dilemma. I hope I have done the right thing. Thanks Bunches..Shar

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Calvert, Md,USA
    Posts
    1,701

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    HB803
    I'm not an expert, but I would have done what you did. IMO, you made the right move leaving the newly "un virgin" queen put. She's their queen now and less chance of rejection. Your bought queen will be accepted "more readily" with the nurse bees on the brood frame. If one or the other does not work out, you can combine them. You can still add frames brood if either needs a boost.
    I'll reiterate what Solomon stated. Ask,,,,,You need not beat your self up so. Trust me, we were all new to bee keeping one time. It's a process. It is not an easy hobby. If it was, lots more would be in it. Makes it all the more rewarding
    Drop a line and let us know how it progresses.
    Rick

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,113

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Quote Originally Posted by honeybee803 View Post
    I just need to figure out what it is I'm doing wrong....
    Two things I think you ought to take away from this experience are that doing nothing rarely makes things worse and that a frame of brood once a week can solve most problems with queens.

    And don't worry about doing things wrong. Everyone does. Bees can survive even you! Have fun and keep learning.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Stafford, VA
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Quote Originally Posted by rhaldridge View Post
    I'm no expert, but my research leads me to believe that feral bee populations in many parts of the country are in better shape than you fear.

    When I joined a local bee club, I was surprised to learn how many small-scale beekeepers had hives in the little coastal city where I live. I think it's reasonable to assume that the genetics of their bees are fairly diverse. Since Drone Congregation Areas (where queens mate) draw drones from many square miles, and since the queen mates with many drones, it seems unlikely to me that an open-mated queen would not have genetics from many sources.

    Finally, I've been reading lately about the bee breeding done by such experts as Kirk Webster, and about how they go to a lot of trouble to find isolated areas for their drone hives and mating nucs. If it were easy to limit the queen's genetics to the lines these breeders are working with, then they wouldn't go to so much trouble, or so it seems to me.
    I certainly hope you're right, but my own anecdotal evidence in Virginia is grim. In 4 years now, I haven't caught a single swarm. I haven't gotten a single call, despite being on multiple swarm lists. At my workplace, they plant tons of nectar/pollen bearing flowers that should have bees in by the thousands, but in the past 3 years I've noticed a very distinct lack of bees at all. Not a single one. Not even a bumblebee. I've seen hummingbirds, and various wasps and butterflies, but not a single bee, and I've actively looked for them, taking walks during lunch just for the sole purpose of spotting some.

    Recently our electrical company (don't ask me why) had an article in their regular magazine where they were interviewing local bee keepers. One bee keeper, Lannie Ballard, who also has gone natural and chemical free was interviewed. He had this to say: "Ballard recounts anecdotal evidence of decreasing feral bees. He used to have several logging companies who would call him if they found a tree with bees in it. "In the past three years, Ive not had a call from them," he notes. "They are not seeing feral bees anymore.""

    I don't doubt it's possible that in heavily wooded areas, or areas that are far from the farming fields, the bees may be surviving just fine in the wild, but my own experience would suggest that - at least in some areas - there are few, if any to be found. I'm firmly in the anti-neonicotinoids camp, and think it's the large amount of corn farming in the area that's to blame.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Fort Walton Beach, Florida
    Posts
    1,256

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    You might find this thread interesting:

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...-a-square-mile

    In my more optimistic moments, I think that there must be at least a few pockets of survivor feral bees and that these will gradually spread through the range formerly occupied by those that have died out. When the European honeybee was introduced to this continent, its spread was remarkably swift. Of course, now there are barriers that didn't exist then-- habitat loss and pesticides, other forms of pollution. But I'm hopeful that they will eventually make at least something of a comeback.

    At our property in NY, there are evidently still plenty of bees, though no apiaries within a few miles. But that's almost ideal country for bees-- old abandoned farms, woods, rough pasture, beaver sloughs.
    In 2002, Seeley (2003) repeated a survey of feral honey bee colonies of Arnot Forest, New York, that he conducted with Visscher in 1978 (Visscher and Seeley, 1982). He found that the number of honey bee colonies was about the same in 1978 and 2002.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Stafford, VA
    Posts
    74

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Quote Originally Posted by rhaldridge View Post
    You might find this thread interesting:

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...-a-square-mile

    In my more optimistic moments, I think that there must be at least a few pockets of survivor feral bees and that these will gradually spread through the range formerly occupied by those that have died out. When the European honeybee was introduced to this continent, its spread was remarkably swift. Of course, now there are barriers that didn't exist then-- habitat loss and pesticides, other forms of pollution. But I'm hopeful that they will eventually make at least something of a comeback.

    At our property in NY, there are evidently still plenty of bees, though no apiaries within a few miles. But that's almost ideal country for bees-- old abandoned farms, woods, rough pasture, beaver sloughs.
    Interesting read! And it does make me feel a bit better. I forget how large, say, state parks can be. So hopefully we do have pockets of the feral bees throughout the U.S. that we can use to repopulate once (if?) we stop being stupid with all the fungicides, pesticides, herbicides, and all manner of other chemicals we're dumping on them.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    Hi, Sorry it has taken so very long to view….I order my queens from Wolf Creek Apiaries. They are in Tenn and I have great luck with the bees and the owners. They are great to talk with.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Bertie County,NC
    Posts
    870

    Default Re: Thought hive was queen less so ordered a queen. What to do now?

    split

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