Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Shook swarm

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Statesville, North Carolina
    Posts
    60

    Default Shook swarm

    If I shake all the bees from a hive into another hive box with fresh comb, how long should it be before I see brood? I did this to break the brood cycle of varoa on March 10. Just wondering if anybody knew how long it takes for the queen to start laying again. I did catch her and gently put her on the new comb.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,690

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    I would think you should be seeing eggs at least by now. Most likely some young larva too.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
    Posts
    1,115

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    Quote Originally Posted by johng View Post
    I would think you should be seeing eggs at least by now. Most likely some young larva too.
    I agree

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    And the queen comes from where? A laying queen you put in the new hive? Some open brood for them to raise one? A laying queen from another of your hives? If you give them a queen who was laying when you put her in, she should be laying immediately. If you introduced a purchased queen in a cage, she might start laying immediately after release or she may take as long as two weeks. Them raising them own? That could take 24 days or so.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Statesville, North Carolina
    Posts
    60

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    I caught the queen in a queen catcher and released her in the new box after I shook all the other bees in. She was laying well before. The bees are very calm, and bringing in pollen and sugar water (I am open feeding). I just figured that after a week I would see larvae. but, nope. Weather has gone cold again, and I can't check them, looks like, for another week or so. The gentleman at Wolf Creek Apiaries told me the bees would quit working if there was no queen. I sure hope she is OK.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    4,067

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    If you have no larvae, I believe you need another queen because if you have looked and can't find anything, something has happened to your queen. You should soon have had capped brood.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    6,340

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    > The gentleman at Wolf Creek Apiaries told me the bees would quit working if there was no queen.

    This may not always be true. Some beekeepers deliberately remove a queen from a hive to cause a brood break and gain increased honey production. Here's a thread that touches on that concept:
    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...-from-one-hive
    Graham
    --- Practical reality trumps philosophy!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    >The gentleman at Wolf Creek Apiaries told me the bees would quit working if there was no queen.

    A hopelessly queenless hive has this attitude. One that is in the process of raising another queen will usually make more honey than one with a queen.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Statesville, North Carolina
    Posts
    60

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    Took a really quick peek yesterday. Found freshly capped brood, larvae, and eggs. (I wore my reading glasses this time)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,664

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    No offense, but this seems like a very ill-advised move. I'm not saying that breaking the brood cycle is bad, quite the opposite, but the timing and approach, assuming you're trying to get a decent honey yield, was very poor. I will break the brood cycle, but I don't do it so early in the buildup cycle. The way you did it will no doubt seriously set back this colony. Perhaps a highly productive colony was not your objective, but I'd not suggest this to others. There are much more effective ways to break the brood cycle and still get a great honey yield, without posing so much risk to the colony.
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Statesville, North Carolina
    Posts
    60

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    No offence taken. Looking back, I did do it way too early. I did a check and found a LOT of larvae that had been pulled out of the comb and dropped to the floor of the hive. I found other signs of a heavy Varoa infestation, so I did the shake to try to break the mite cycle. I also wanted to get them out of the horizontal Langstroth and into a Kenyan top bar. Didn't figure to have that big of a break in the brood cycle. Live and learn!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,341

    Default Re: Shook swarm

    I would never waste all that brood comb. IF I were trying to make a break in the brood cycle, I'd take a frame of brood and the queen and a comb of honey and put them in a nuc, and let the old hive raise a new queen. By the time the new queen is laying, there is no brood in the hive. If you do this two weeks before the flow, you will get an INCREASE in production.

    http://www.bushfarms.com/beessplits.htm#confiningqueen
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads