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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Sudbury, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    101

    Default Building with "2x10" rough cut

    I'm a total beginner, please don't judge...
    I bought two complete hives from FW Jones with Pierco frames, all relevant hive accessories, tools, suit, smoker, ect... under the guidance of local Bee Keepers

    I read "Bee Keeping for Dummies" this winter to prepare myself for the upcoming bee keeping journey of next summer... I understand the clear concept of "bee-space" per langstroth, but can i duplicate a langstroth hive with proper "bee-space" and build it with rough cut lumber? I'd like another (3) hives. Considering the shipping costs and materials i could save a few hundred dollars.

    Is it worth it and if so, what would the "CONS" be associated with this idea?
    Note: Weather here is Winter: MAX Low: -40 degrees celcius
    Summer: Max High: 35 degrees celcius

    Northern Ontario, Canada

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    proctorsville, vermont
    Posts
    152

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    yes you can and start building. sounds to me like once you get your bees you will bee hooked.
    thats the way i roll.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,539

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    You can..... it just requires A LOT more measuring. Problem is that the hive components will not be readily interchangable. Rough cut can vary a great deal in width.
    I take it you don't know of anyone that has a planer? Maybe through the local beekeepers club? Woodshop night class through the local high school?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Coopersville, Michigan
    Posts
    260

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    You can, but... there's always a but. You of course need to make sure that the lumber is dry so that you don't get later shrinkage that will change bee space. Also rough cut can be different thickness, which depending on your joint type will change the lengths of pieces that you use. As long as you measure for inside dimensions you can get away with it. The thicker rough cut would still be interchangeable as long as you're ok with an overhang between boxes with different size outside dimensions. You'll also use more paint or whatever to preserve it, but it might stick better in the long run, though rough exterior surfaces and overhangs provide more places for water to get trapped. The bees will just propolize the rough insides so no biggy there. You'll also get an extra point of R-value with the thicker wood, but it will be a bit heavier too. It's all about trade offs. I have access to a planer so I use it when I have rough cut, but since I'm not too far from several big box stores I buy 1x on sale, though since I've found a guy with a sawmill close buy I may be changing my tune soon, it's hard to pass up 50cents a board foot.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    5,994

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    You will have no problem building standard lang hives with 2" lumber as long as you remember it is the interior dimensions that are the key.

    If you want to know those dimensions, plans for everything Lang are here:
    http://www.beesource.com/build-it-yourself/

    The only downside to 2" lumber is the extra weight of handling the hives.
    ultracrepidarian >> noting or pertaining to a person who criticizes, judges, or gives advice outside of his expertise

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    lafargeville ny usa
    Posts
    670

    Wink Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    if the rough cut is out of a band saw mill and it is fairly consistant mill run, you may not even have to think about planeing. as was previously mentioned watch the moisture. i use rough hemlock and plane it to 7/8. the inside meausurements are what counts. do not forget you will need oversize tops, [found out thr hard way].the bottoms work all the same .how long you will need to air dry it will depend on what time of the year it was cut and your climate. as a rule of thumb one year inside with the stack flat with sticks between layers. 1 1/2 to 2 years outside sticked. if you use it to green it will split, warp, shrink, mold and the paint will peel...
    Last edited by mathesonequip; 03-16-2013 at 08:48 AM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Niskayuna, NY, USA
    Posts
    97

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    10" rough width is usually going to shrink too much for a full deep box. Mine all shrunk to 9 1/2", which is 1/8" to short for a deep box.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    lafargeville ny usa
    Posts
    670

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    some place here in beesource there is a great article about equipment dimension variations between varrious manufactuers. commercial deeps vary from 9 5/8 to 9 1/2. so you could just get away with 9 1/2. i looked it up. i had some 9 1/2 boards that i was going to use up before i realized that they were #1 black cherry.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Union County, Ky, USA
    Posts
    215

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    If you do build your stuff from some 2 by material, let us know how it works out. I have been wanting to try it for some time now. I saw over on the beehavior site someone used some beemax foam components and had built a hive body out of a 2x10. So I was intrigued.

    Like someone else posted earlier, the weight will probably be an issue when handling them. Typical telescoping outer covers probably wont fit them either. So, all of that would have to be made too. I would think it would make a very strong rabbit joint at the corners, with so much surface to glue and screw. I would like to see some box joints on that big ole chunk of wood!

    Let us know how it works out, if you dont mind.....

    Rob

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    1,811

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    If you are planning to use box joints you may find your dado blade may not raise enough for 2 inch stock. On my saws, an 8 inch set of dados will only cut 1 1/2 inch above my sled. The sled thickness is 1/2 inch. Of course different saws will raise to different heights.

    cchoganjr

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Sudbury, Ontario
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: Building with "2x10" rough cut

    As a fellow Sudburian... my recommendation to you would be to possibly look for other sources of woodenware. I'm picking up a pile of boxes this week from a small supplier west of Toronto this week; his prices are almost half that of larger bee supply stores... but he's having equipment essentially made to order, and he's a commercial Beek, so he doesn't have the large overhead of a bee supply store. Just a couple of choices of equipment to purchase. It's not fancy grade lumber, but who needs that stuff!

    As for the weather and our winters... ventilation! I don't think I've ever used an entrance reducer in the winter (this is my 4th year). I've got top entrances, and many boxes have a 7/8" hole drilled in the front of both deep hive bodies as well. I wrap with the insulated "bee cozy" (black polyethylene with polyester batting inside). This spring i've got 100% survivors on 13 hives. Last spring... lost one, it was the one I expected to lose.

    I'll be making my own bottom boards... buying deeps and outer covers, still have a pile of inner covers to use. Also making nuc boxes out of plywood, starting in a few weeks.

    Something else to consider... finding a couple of people who are looking to expand, and see if they're willing to do a bulk purchase to get a better price.

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