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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Palm Harbor, Fl USA
    Posts
    455

    Default drone brood- scratching vs freezing

    Trying to keep up with IPM methods for varroa: rather than freeze drone brood, which requires additonal frames to swap out each time you visit the freezer- can't you just use an uncapping scratcher on site to kill the drone brood and lower varroa counts?

    would the varroa be mature enough to hop off the drone pupae, at capped brood stage, onto the workers? (if so its back to the freezer)
    My wife says I have ADD, but, hey look- a chicken!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Alachua County, FL, USA
    Posts
    6,431

    Default Re: drone brood- scratching vs freezing

    You can scratch drone brood and they will clean it up.
    There is at least one mature Varroa in each cell that will attempt to escape.
    americasbeekeeper.com
    beekeeper@americasbeekeeper.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Warrior, Alabama
    Posts
    1,056

    Default Re: drone brood- scratching vs freezing

    Freezing kills them along with SHB eggs and larva and wax moth larva and the eggs of the greater wax moth.
    Lesser wax moth eggs survive common freezers.

    Freeze & scratch.
    Old Guy in Alabama

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,447

    Default Re: drone brood- scratching vs freezing

    Aren't we just selecting for Varroa who prefer workers to drones, which is what we do not want. In it's natural host, Varroa only attacks the drone brood. To select for that we should destroy all the worker brood...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Palm Harbor, Fl USA
    Posts
    455

    Default Re: drone brood- scratching vs freezing

    I hear you. It just seems (and I'm still a newbie by most standards) that many issues for colonies stem from high Varroa counts. While selecting and splitting colonies that demonstrate VSH is a long term goal, in the short term, a goal is keeping enough colonies alive to sell some honey and maybe some bees.
    My wife says I have ADD, but, hey look- a chicken!

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