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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Lakeland, FL, USA
    Posts
    60

    Default Re: Making Splits and looking for the Queen; Is there a better way?

    Quote Originally Posted by chillardbee View Post
    I look for the queen as I'm making up the nuc and I'm comfortable enough that if I don't see her on a frame inside of 30 seconds that she is not on it. quite often I'll find her as I'm making up the nuc and I just set her aside. The time of year also helps, it's easier to find a queen in the spring then in mid summer during a flow. My worst is that I grabed 2% of the queens but most often I grab none. It takes about 5-7 minutes to make a nuc like that from the opening the hive to putting the lid on your hive and nuc.

    If you have a partner out there with you you can double check the the frames. When my dad and I made nucs I would open the hive and as I came across the frames for the nuc I would give it a quick check 15-20 seconds then pass it to my dad who would check it until I passed him the next frame. When the nuc was made he'd close everything up while I moved onto the next hive.


    My entire childhood

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    3,892

    Default Re: Making Splits and looking for the Queen; Is there a better way?

    You could just not worry about the queen. Break the hive into nucs, cell all of them. On your first inspection the nuc with the queen will be obviously stronger. Besides, there is a fair chance you will spot her without even trying.
    since '09-25H-T-Z6b

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,596

    Default Re: Making Splits and looking for the Queen; Is there a better way?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    Bee-Go works
    Not on cool days when splitting happens.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Pigeon Falls, WI
    Posts
    2,527

    Default Re: Making Splits and looking for the Queen; Is there a better way?

    If you sprinkle some bee-go on your smoker fuel ....then smoke the bees they will move through the excluder.....even during cooler weather.
    Leer Family Honey Farm-Shannon Leer

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,328

    Default Re: Making Splits and looking for the Queen; Is there a better way?

    Now that I went to eight frame mediums, I split them by the box and don't look for anything other than four 8 frame medium boxes full of bees. The queen is wherever she is and the part that is queenless will raise one. I can split a yard in an hour or two, depending on the size of the yard. If I'm wanting to introduce queens, I do it as cells, in all of them. The queenlesss ones will usually accept the queen, and the queen right ones usually get superseded.

    But assuming you don't want the queen in it, (so you can introduce queens) I think shaking them all off (or blowing them all off) and putting the frames above an excluder is your best bet.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,596

    Default Re: Making Splits and looking for the Queen; Is there a better way?

    Quote Originally Posted by Beeslave View Post
    If you sprinkle some bee-go on your smoker fuel ....then smoke the bees they will move through the excluder.....even during cooler weather.
    Interesting. Not sure I want to try it but interesting. That stuff is nasty when its not on fire.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Marysville, CA, USA
    Posts
    109

    Default Re: Making Splits and looking for the Queen; Is there a better way?

    I like to crack the hive and check for brood in top and bottom box without pulling any frames. If both boxes have brood top box goes on a new pallet put lids on and move on to the next. Next day or two I'll add cells to all of them add a box with drawn comb and foundation and give them light syrup. 10-15 days later I'll check for eggs and add mated queens if the hive is queenless. This has worked out good for my little operation. I prefer to do my splits day after I get them home from almond, that way all my new splits can stay in the same yard.
    John

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Malta
    Posts
    7

    Default Re: Making Splits and looking for the Queen; Is there a better way?

    I am a hobbyist bee keeper and I come from Malta (I know you're going to say where the hack is Malta but it's a small island beneath Sicily in the middle of the Mediterranean).

    My question is, I have a hive and I know that the queen is old I know that she's in there but not laying much. I was thinking to replace her but couldn't find her. If I insert a queen cage with a virgin queen cell inside instead of buying a new queen and I leave it for 4 days with the cage facing down would the old queen be on the cage netting trying to kill the new queen which is yet to emerge (or already emerged in the incubator). I was thinking on hatching a queen cell in an incubator since I never managed to find the queen and to use it as bait to find the old queen.

    would it be possible to tell me the correct procedure please or some information please. from inserting the queen cell in the incubator till installation please.

    thanks and regard
    JPG

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