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Thread: Glue to use?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Glue to use?

    Any ideas of a type of glue to use for my beehive, specifically non-harmful (with the intent basically of glueing down my entrance reducer, and being able to rip it up (not too easily) when needed?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Pottstown, Pennyslvania, USA
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    I just use small screws for items I want to be able to remove later, or don't want to move, like shims. I wouldn't recommend glue. Just pre-drill a hole, and use a weather resistant screw.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    There's no need to glue down the entrance reducer. After a few days the bees will glue it in place. If you feel like it may fall out just use a piece of the blue painters tape to temporarily hold it in place.

    For gluing the joints of the boxes Titebond II or III works good.

  4. #4
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    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    > and being able to rip it up (not too easily) when needed?

    If you want to use glue, put a moderate amount of glue on both mating surfaces, then insert a piece of paper between the two pieces of wood before pressing them together. The paper will make a weak joint so you can take it apart later.

    .
    Last edited by Rader Sidetrack; 03-06-2013 at 09:35 PM.
    Graham
    USDA Zone 7A Elevation 1400 ft

  5. #5
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    Issaquah,WA,USA
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    So this is what I have been told. Tightbond II is weather proof. Means gets wet. Tight bond III is Water Proof like for a dock area. So you can use either. II is a couple bucks cheaper per gallon. HD has II and Lowes has III in the gallons.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    Use Titebond III, it's the best glue you could ever buy!
    President, San Francisco Beekeepers Association
    www.habitatforhoneybees.org

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    it may not make any difference in texas but up here it does.. titebond III behaves a lot better when useing at temperatures close to frezzeing.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    Propolis is what you want to use.
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Midland, MI
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by mathesonequip View Post
    it may not make any difference in texas but up here it does.. titebond III behaves a lot better when useing at temperatures close to frezzeing.
    I didn't pay much attention to this, but i was working out in the shop at around 20degF and noticed that the TBIII was still pretty workable as it began to freeze up. the TBII was not at all usable. Perhaps it had to do with volumetrics and cooling rate. I forget which one was more or less full, or positioned closer to the heater or window, but i remember noting that the TBIII was usable and the TBII was not.

    With that said, i prefer the viscosity of teh TBII. it is not so runny as the TBIII

    The labels clearly indicate that these are not to be frozen and should be stored at ...i forget, but some temperature above freezing.

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Sullivan, MO
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by KPeacock View Post
    I didn't pay much attention to this, but i was working out in the shop at around 20degF and noticed that the TBIII was still pretty workable as it began to freeze up. the TBII was not at all usable. Perhaps it had to do with volumetrics and cooling rate. I forget which one was more or less full, or positioned closer to the heater or window, but i remember noting that the TBIII was usable and the TBII was not.

    With that said, i prefer the viscosity of teh TBII. it is not so runny as the TBIII

    The labels clearly indicate that these are not to be frozen and should be stored at ...i forget, but some temperature above freezing.
    For our uses there is NO practical difference in the water resistance of titebond II and TB III

    http://www.titebond.com/frequently_asked_questions.aspx

    For those of you not able to go to the website here is the applicable section:
    What is the difference between the ANSI/HPVA Type I and Type II water-resistance specification?

    Both of these tests are conducted using 6” by 6” birch laminates glued together to make three-ply plywood. The test for Type I is clearly more stringent than Type II, and involves boiling the glue bonds and testing the specimens while they are wet.

    Type I testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 1" by 3" specimens, boiling them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 145F oven for 20 hours. They are boiled for an additional 4 hours, then immediately cooled using running water. The specimens are sheared while wet, and the bonds must pass certain strength and wood failure requirements to pass the Type I specification.

    Type II testing involves cutting the 6" by 6" assemblies into 2" by 5" specimens, soaking them for 4 hours, then baking the specimens in a 120F oven for 19 hours. This is repeated for a total of three cycles, and the bonds must not delaminate to pass the Type II specification.


    I don't know about you guys but I stopped boiling my frames and hivebodies a LONG time ago.

    Rod

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    If you use tite bond II or III you will have a permanent seal

    Put tape or staple to hold it in place the bees will seal it

    IMHO

  12. #12
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by rweakley View Post
    I don't know about you guys but I stopped boiling my frames and hivebodies a LONG time ago.

    Rod
    I glue all my wooden ware when I build it with titebond II or III. And yes, I boil all my new boxes, bottom boards, inner covers, and top covers after the glue is dried. While I can't attest to what happens to the glue and whether it becomes soft and then hardens up again, or it breaks down, etc. I can assure you my equipment is rock solid after I dip it my 250-325 degree wax/rosin tank for 12 minutes.

    Now, back to the original question about gluing an entrance reducer down....I like the idea of a couple of screws, if anything. I just slide them in and let the bees glue them down.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    KC, MO, USA
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    Titebond III the best out there

    before III I used II
    I cant tell the difference cause neither one has failed.

    Look on Amazon for a gallon $29 free shipping can go wrong for that.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lburou View Post
    Propolis is what you want to use.
    For an entrance reducer...what Lburou said. Just wedge it a little bit between the bottomboard and the bottom edge of the brood box...the bees will handle the rest of the sealing.

    Ed

  15. #15
    Join Date
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    Massillon, Ohio
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    Default Re: Glue to use?

    Mash a little bur comb wax on the ends of the reducer and push it into the opening. The wax will help hold it in place until the bees secure it with propolis, as johng mentioned.

    I would not recommend using glue, you will regret it if it forms a permanent bond.
    To everything there is a season....

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