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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Posts
    72

    Default Spraying of Glyphophate

    If a farmer tells me when he is going to spray this stuff for his RR Corn a few days before what all can I do to prevent something bad happening to my bees? The day he is going to spray can I plug the entrance for a few hours as long as the bees have good ventilation? Is a few hours not good enough? If it is in June, July heat here in AL and he srays and the stuff is dry in an hour or so can I hold them back for say 5 or 6 and be ok is I guess what I am asking. Should I just relocate the bees?

    Thanks for any help

    clark

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    574

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    earlier today someone psoted a PDF from the university of Washington, with some input from the university of idaho. it details dang near EVERY pesticide and how long you should keep bees away from it.

    they have Roundup (glyphosphate) on the " Can be applied at any time with reasonable safety to bees" list. So, i wouldn;t worry about it. even if it is "bad" you will lose a few foragers, and tehy will quickly be repalced. it certainly isn;t a chemical that will destroy the colony. If you message me your e-mail address, I can e-mail you a copy of it...or you can search the forums...i saved the file earlier today, but don;t remember where it came from.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    5,887

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    Assuming the farmer is really spraying Glyphosate, it is an herbicide, not an insecticide. It is not particularly toxic to insects. Generally, there is a small amount of surfactant (like detergent) as part of the final mix, and as a result can kill insects if sprayed directly on them. But typically the spray dries on the plants within 2 hours, and is then harmless to insects.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glyphosate
    ultracrepidarian >> noting or pertaining to a person who criticizes, judges, or gives advice outside of his expertise

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,041

    Thumbs Up Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    I wonder if he is actually spraying the herbicide called glyphosate (aka roundup)? I wouldn't like the idea, but my guess is it would not harm the bees since it is a herbicide and sprayed at the ground.

    Quote Originally Posted by Industry Task Force on Glyphosate
    Impact of glyphosate on honeybees

    Glyphosate and glyphosate-based formulations have been extensively tested in the laboratory and in the field to evaluate their potential toxicity to honeybees. When glyphosate was sprayed on large areas of vegetation directly adjacent to beehives it was found to have no acute or chronic effects on adult honeybees or brood production even at concentrations three times higher than usual application rates [SIZE=2]4[/SIZE]. These same researchers also showed no effects to adult honeybees and their brood in direct feeding experiments with concentration levels that were two to three orders of magnitude above environmental exposure levels. In addition, an Australian brood study demonstrated that glyphosate has no impact on bees [SIZE=2]5, 6[/SIZE].
    ( Maja Dumat/pixelio.de)
    The conclusions from all of these acute and chronic studies demonstrate that honeybee adults and larvae are not affected by glyphosate or glyphosate-based formulations in realistic field scenarios. These results have also been confirmed by a bee brood study conducted recently to meet the current EU testing requirements for the glyphosate authorisation renewal.
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    885

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    Quote Originally Posted by CChampion View Post
    If a farmer tells me when he is going to spray this stuff for his RR Corn a few days before what all can I do to prevent something bad happening to my bees? The day he is going to spray can I plug the entrance for a few hours as long as the bees have good ventilation? Is a few hours not good enough? If it is in June, July heat here in AL and he srays and the stuff is dry in an hour or so can I hold them back for say 5 or 6 and be ok is I guess what I am asking. Should I just relocate the bees?

    Thanks for any help

    clark
    What bad do you think is going to come to your bees from glyphosate? it's a salt for god sake. A salt that breaks down in sunlight to harmless componets. If you feel the need to lock your bees up go ahead, but I think it's a waste of time and effort. Are your bees in the field that is going to be sprayed? within 50 feet? If not why worry, I'm gonna guess they aren't spraying with there are a bunch of things in bloom that the bees are going to be attracted to. I wouldn't hose my hive down with glyphosate, but than again I wouldn't hose my hive down with water LOL. I think of the things you have to worry about this is a VERY small one. Worry about the mites, the small hive beetles, the viruses, the bacteria, and the drought that could be coming your way.


    COPIED FROM WIKIPEDIA
    Glyphosate toxicity
    Glyphosate has a United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxicity Class of III (on a I to IV scale, where IV is least dangerous) for oral and inhalation exposure.[46] Nonetheless, as with other herbicides, the EPA requires that products containing glyphosate carry a label that warns against oral intake, mandates the use of protective clothing, and instructs users not to re-enter treated fields for at least 4 hours.[46][47] Glyphosate does not bioaccumulate and breaks down rapidly in the environment.[48]
    COPIED FROM WIKIPEDIA

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,866

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    Unless there are abunch of flowering weeds in the cornfields, the bees won't be there and the roundup won't hurt them or you anyway.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
    Posts
    2,790

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    Your answer is already here, but I'll say it again: the direct toxicity of glyphosate to bees is low.

    However, I consider the consequences of glyphosate and 2,4-D and other herbicide use more damaging to bee populations than most insecticides. Herbicides clean up fields and roadside ditches and pastures and lawns and other areas of "weeds." Those flowering plants deemed "weeds" are the forage sources for bees.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    566

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    I wonder why he would spray it on his corn, it would kill it. Not quite sure what RR corn is unless it is a hybrid that is resistant to glycophosphate.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    574

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    its called Roundup Ready corn. I plant this for my deer. It's a corn that is resistant to the effects of roundup (glyphosphate) so you simply plant it, and then after its been growing a few weeks, you can apply roundup to kill all of the weeds that try to grow along side it. The corn takes a slight hit in that it sometimes yellows a bit for a day or two, but it recovers quickly and then you have weed free farming, which results in better yields. after the corn gets to about 30" or so, it shades the ground effectively, so no more roundup is needed to control the weeds.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Tulsa, OK
    Posts
    3,425

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    I would not have concerns over the Roundup. I would have possible concerns over whatever neonic pesticides are being used with the corn seeds, particularly around planting time.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Warrior, Alabama
    Posts
    1,067

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    Rweakley, I am not sure God's sake has anything to do with it. I have used Roundup for years. I never bothered to think that it was a salt. He asked a valid question. I am glad he got some vaild answers.
    Old Guy in Alabama

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,148

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    The only thing I would be concerned it over spray if your hives are within feet of the corn.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Fort Wayne, IN
    Posts
    929

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    Farmers generally spray RR early in the growth cycle and there shouldn't be bees in the field unless he has a dandelion problem.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Tuscaloosa, AL
    Posts
    72

    Default Re: Spraying of Glyphophate

    Thanks for all the assuring responses, I do a lot of reading and I'm new to this. I've only been at it for a year now and even though I read about things I like to ask 1st hand experiences if possible. The farmer just grows the corn for feed and the type of corn it is there is no pesticide sprayed at planting. I know him and he had told me the glyphosphate shouldn't be a factor but just wanted to ask fellow bee folk!

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