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  1. #1
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    Default new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    March 4, 2013

    From ABJ


    Researchers ID Queens,

    Mysterious Disease

    Syndrome as Key Factors

    in Bee Colony Deaths

    by MATT SHIPMAN
    (Courtesy North Carolina State University News Service, Raleigh, NC)


    A new long-term study of honey bee health has found that a little-understood disease study authors are calling “idiopathic brood disease syndrome” (IBDS), which kills off bee larvae, is the largest risk factor for predicting the death of a bee colony.

    “Historically, we’ve seen symptoms similar to IBDS associated with viruses spread by large-scale infestations of parasitic mites,” says Dr. David Tarpy, an associate professor of entomology at North Carolina State University and co-author of a paper describing the study. “But now we’re seeing these symptoms – a high percentage of larvae deaths – in colonies that have relatively few of these mites. That suggests that IBDS is present even in colonies with low mite loads, which is not what we expected.” The study was conducted by researchers from NC State, the University of Maryland, Pennsylvania State University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).


    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...67587712002656

    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...67587712002656

    The study evaluated the health of 80 commercial colonies of honey bees (Apis mellifera) in the eastern United States on an almost monthly basis over the course of 10 months – which is a full working “season” for commercial bee colonies. The goal of the study was to track changes in bee colony health and, for those colonies that died off, to determine what factors earlier in the year may have contributed to colony death. Fifty-six percent of the colonies died during the study.

    “We found that colonies affected by IBDS had a risk factor of 3.2,” says Dr. Dennis vanEnglesdorp of the University of Maryland, who was lead author on the paper. That means that colonies with IBDS were 3.2 times more likely to die than the other colonies over the course of the study.

    While the study found that IBDS was the greatest risk factor, a close runner-up was the occurrence of a so-called “queen event.”

    Honey bee colonies have only one queen. When a colony perceives something wrong with its queen, the workers eliminate that queen and try to replace her. This process is not always smooth or successful. The occurrence of a queen event had a risk factor of 3.1.

    “This is the first time anyone has done an epidemiological study to repeatedly evaluate the health of the same commercial honey bee colonies over the course of a season,” Tarpy says. “It shows that IBDS is a significant problem that we don’t understand very well. It also highlights that we need to learn more about what causes colonies to reject their queens. These are areas we are actively researching. Hopefully, this will give us insights into other health problems, including colony collapse disorder.”

    The paper, “Idiopathic brood disease syndrome and queen events as precursors of colony mortality in migratory beekeeping operations in the eastern United States,” is published in the February issue of Preventive Veterinary Medicine. Co-authors of the study include Dr. Eugene Lengerich of Penn State and Dr. Jeffery Pettis of USDA. The work was supported by USDA and the National Honey Board.

    The study abstract follows.

    “Idiopathic brood disease syndrome and queen events as precursors of colony mortality in migratory beekeeping operations in the eastern United States”

    Authors: Dennis vanEnglesdorp, University of Maryland; David R. Tarpy, North Carolina State University; Eugene J. Lengerich, Pennsylvania State University; and Jeffery S. Pettis, USDA-ARS Bee Research Laboratory

    Published: February 2013, Preventive Veterinary Medicine

    Abstract: Using standard epidemiological methods, this study set out to quantify the risk associated with exposure to easily diagnosed factors on colony mortality and morbidity in three migratory beekeeping operations. Fifty-six percent of all colonies monitored during the 10-month period died. The relative risk (RR) that a colony would die over the short term (?50 days) was appreciably increased in colonies diagnosed with Idiopathic Brood Disease Syndrome (IBDS), a condition where brood of different ages appear molten on the bottom of cells (RR = 3.2), or with a “queen event” (e.g., evidence of queen replacement or failure; RR = 3.1). We also found that several risk factors—including the incidence of a poor brood pattern, chalkbood (CB), deformed wing virus (DWV), sacbrood virus (SBV), and exceeding the threshold of 5 Varroa mites per 100 bees—were differentially expressed in different beekeeping operations. Further, we found that a diagnosis of several factors were significantly more or less likely to be associated with a simultaneous diagnosis of another risk factor. These finding support the growing consensus that the causes of colony mortality are multiple and interrelated.




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  2. #2
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    Quote Originally Posted by LSPender View Post
    “But now we’re seeing these symptoms – a high percentage of larvae deaths – in colonies that have relatively few of these mites. That suggests that IBDS is present even in colonies with low mite loads, which is not what we expected.”... These finding support the growing consensus that the causes of colony mortality are multiple and interrelated.
    Complexity increases.
    Disclaimer: I've never been a bee.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    Is it just me or was this devoid of facts? I didn't see anything that told me what or how? just some "risk factor" numbers related to problems we are already aware of, and "queen events"????/ 56% loss in 10 months???

    Looks to me like a new bogeyman????

  4. #4
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    I thought so as well. Too many variables un accounted for to form sound conclusion. Idiopathic means it is hidden or not identified, it would seem. 80 hive sample,,,, I'm afraid a new treatment is on the horizon. Maybe a grant for further study
    Rick

  5. #5
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    Jeff Pettis spoke about some of the findings last Saturday at the Worcester Bee Club day. He reports that they are finding that some queens have about half the sperm dead, while good queens have 85+% alive. He conjectures this could be part of the problem. This year they are following western beekeepers also [migratory] and 3 organic beekeepers to compare.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    Quote Originally Posted by camero7 View Post
    Jeff Pettis spoke about some of the findings last Saturday at the Worcester Bee Club day. He reports that they are finding that some queens have about half the sperm dead, while good queens have 85+% alive. He conjectures this could be part of the problem. This year they are following western beekeepers also [migratory] and 3 organic beekeepers to compare.
    More info in this line that that other whole article....... Still need some real data, what was the difference between "good" and "bad"? and do we know this is something new???

  7. #7
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    the amount of dead sperm. Just that the syndrome has been identified. He had lots of questions and few answers.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    Seems like that's the story of beekeeping the past few years - Lots of questions, with few answers.
    Which makes for very few dull moments.
    From the above posts, it appears they do not yet have any idea what is killing the sperm, correct?
    Regards,
    Steven
    "If all you have is a hammer, the whole world is a nail." - A.H. Maslow

  9. #9
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    That's my understanding...

  10. #10
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    No disrespect to the participants, but how did the designers of the studies expect to discover how the bees where dying when the time between inspections was 50 days(or did I read that wrong)? We have noticed a rise in problems when we stretch out from 12 days in the spring to 21 days in the late summer. Alot can happen in 21 days.

    Crazy Roland

  11. #11
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    errrr,
    Fifty-six percent of the colonies died during the study.
    ...my reading is that over half of the commercial colonies they followed died in less than a year. did the 10 months include winter?

    wrt the further studies...what is an organic beekeeping operation?

    deknow
    The perils of benefactors; The blessings of parasites; Blindness blindness and sight -Joni Mitchell 'Shadows and Light'

  12. #12
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    Quote Originally Posted by Roland View Post
    No disrespect to the participants, but how did the designers of the studies expect to discover how the bees where dying when the time between inspections was 50 days(or did I read that wrong)? We have noticed a rise in problems when we stretch out from 12 days in the spring to 21 days in the late summer. Alot can happen in 21 days.

    Crazy Roland
    My understanding is the beekeeper was working the hives during those periods. Researchers made trips to the bees to inspect them for the study.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    Quote Originally Posted by deknow View Post
    errrr,

    ...my reading is that over half of the commercial colonies they followed died in less than a year. did the 10 months include winter?

    wrt the further studies...what is an organic beekeeping operation?

    deknow

    I don't believe it included winter... just spring to fall following some migratory beekeepers.

    You'll have to ask Pettis about what an organic operation is.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: new study , IBDS, queen mortality

    Researchers made trips to the bees to inspect them for the study.

    That's even worse. I do not understand why they did not do a better job.
    I can understand the value of the statistics, but they can only provide clues?

    I sure would like to see a high paid University type come out and get their smoker and clothes dirty. Only then will be start to see the beginning of the end of our problems. I welcome them, but they will be tired puppies at the end of the day.

    Crazy Roland

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