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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,476

    Default Who's looking for proof?

    http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-20...2.archive.html

    These results hold even for crops stocked routinely with high densities of honey bees for pollination, such as almond, blueberry, mango or watermelon. Although honey bees are generally viewed as a substitute for wild pollinators, this study demonstrates that they neither maximize pollination, nor fully replace the contributions of diverse, wild-insect assemblages to fruit set for a broad range of crops and agricultural practices on all continents with farmland.
    Must be all bull, right?

    Diversity, it is the strength of all companies, countries, populations, and nature. Why do we work so hard against it?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    Posts
    31

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    I'm not sure what you are asking. The article says that an increase in diversity increased pollination effectiveness, and as someone who works in a pollination lab there is little doubt that introducing native pollinators forces honey bees to be more efficient and better pollinators. Your quote says "They (honey bees) neither maximize pollination, nor fully replace the contributions of diverse, wild-insect assemblages..."

  3. #3

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    Wild pollinators are great but the greatest majority of people making a living off them are the researchers. In addition, wild pollinators won't survive very well in orchard country where a lot of insecticides are being used. Honey bees can be moved in for the bloom and then moved out before the spraying starts.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,845

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    EHB have been called out already. We know they're not the best or most efficient pollinators but they're the best for commercial needs and accuracy by volume so to say.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,644

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    Who cares about other pollinators?? Bees are teh only ones who will share the honey!!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Litchfield, CT, USA
    Posts
    430

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    "Give me honey or give me death!" Or something like that...

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