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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,451

    Default Who's looking for proof?

    http://home.ezezine.com/1636/1636-20...2.archive.html

    These results hold even for crops stocked routinely with high densities of honey bees for pollination, such as almond, blueberry, mango or watermelon. Although honey bees are generally viewed as a substitute for wild pollinators, this study demonstrates that they neither maximize pollination, nor fully replace the contributions of diverse, wild-insect assemblages to fruit set for a broad range of crops and agricultural practices on all continents with farmland.
    Must be all bull, right?

    Diversity, it is the strength of all companies, countries, populations, and nature. Why do we work so hard against it?
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Thousand Oaks, CA
    Posts
    25

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    I'm not sure what you are asking. The article says that an increase in diversity increased pollination effectiveness, and as someone who works in a pollination lab there is little doubt that introducing native pollinators forces honey bees to be more efficient and better pollinators. Your quote says "They (honey bees) neither maximize pollination, nor fully replace the contributions of diverse, wild-insect assemblages..."

  3. #3

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    Wild pollinators are great but the greatest majority of people making a living off them are the researchers. In addition, wild pollinators won't survive very well in orchard country where a lot of insecticides are being used. Honey bees can be moved in for the bloom and then moved out before the spraying starts.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    2,441

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    EHB have been called out already. We know they're not the best or most efficient pollinators but they're the best for commercial needs and accuracy by volume so to say.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,649

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    Who cares about other pollinators?? Bees are teh only ones who will share the honey!!!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Litchfield, CT, USA
    Posts
    407

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    "Give me honey or give me death!" Or something like that...

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,606

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    Here is my bit on this study.
    They say the study shows that honey bees improve pollination by 14%.
    They claim that natural insect populations result in 100% increase.

    But this is hardly the entire story.

    Honey bees contibute 0% to any damage to the crops. they do not spread diseases to the corps lay their young on the plants to feed on it. they do not suck juices from the plant needed for healthy growth. nothing. Natural insect populations would in fact be 100% responsibly for any and all of those damages to the crop. SO a 100% increse in fruit set minus what percentage of overall damaged crop, plants etc>

    For example. The sphinx moth is one of only a few insects that will have anything to do with tobacco plants. IT is also the single greatest contributor to damage to tobacco leaves. it alone can destroy entire harvests. So one single insect is responsible for nearly 100% of the damage and that damage can result in a 100% failure of the crop.

    Diversity is diversity and it is not all good.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Garland, Bladen County, NC, USA
    Posts
    2,766

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    Pretty hard to maintain those diverse populations in a monocrop situation, even when you actively try to build habitats for wild polliinators. They just don't survive the insecticides, funigicides, that are used. The honey bee just stays for a month or so ... then out of there.
    “Don’t tell me how educated you are, tell me how much you have travelled.” - The Quran

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    8,451

    Default Re: Who's looking for proof?

    Quote Originally Posted by hpm08161947 View Post
    Pretty hard to maintain those diverse populations in a monocrop situation,
    Bingo! Someone finally got the message.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

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