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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Alexandria, Virginia
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    110

    Default Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    I was introduced to the WARM WAY set up for beehives a few weeks ago. Everything I have seen points to another way raising bees. Iwas wondering how many out there use or have heard of this.

    The things I like about it:
    • The frame sits on the ground made of 2x10s on a bed of stone dust
    • ventilation is accomplished through convection which is regulated by the bees
    • the openings for ventilation have regular screen and 1/2" mesh for critters
    • stone dust is impregnated with nematodes twice a year for SHB
    • the entrance is oriented perpendicular to the frames and away from prevailing winds
    • from the entrance the bees place pollen, brood then honey in that order: is this anyone's experience; does this hold true for the rest of the hive?
    • The top feeder is enclosed in a feed shim using rapid feeders which is not open to the environment and stays at colony ambient temperature.
    • feeder shim is screened off; you are not exposed to bees when checking levels...
    • syrup is not open to the air
    • you can work the colony from the rear and can keep the colony at (3)-8-framed boxes and remove honey frames as they are capped.
    • Other than all this it is pretty much the same.


    Here is a video of Billy Davis
    Any Ideas?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,567

    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    Probably the ideal system would be to rotate the hive relative to the entrance, cold way in the summer and warm way in the winter -- which refers only to the location of the entrance, not the rest of this "idea".

    I don't think anyone is going to go to the work of using two different bases and switching the hive around spring and fall, though.

    Peter

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    But from what I have seen the frames infront of the entrance are invariably pollen and so forth, being like an insulator for the front sunny side?...yeah, I think it would just stay inplace year round , that's why I wanted to see what anyone else's experience with this is.... thanks for youresponse.

    Quote Originally Posted by psfred View Post
    Probably the ideal system would be to rotate the hive relative to the entrance, cold way in the summer and warm way in the winter -- which refers only to the location of the entrance, not the rest of this "idea".

    I don't think anyone is going to go to the work of using two different bases and switching the hive around spring and fall, though.

    Peter

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    Back when I had more separate stands and 10 frame boxes I ran mine the warm way. Now I'm using eight frame boxes on stands of 14 hives and it isn't so convenient.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    Michael, so are the benefits to this worthwhile?

    Do the bees arrange the frames like I mentioned above and do they maintain this pattern in the brood boxes?



    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    Back when I had more separate stands and 10 frame boxes I ran mine the warm way. Now I'm using eight frame boxes on stands of 14 hives and it isn't so convenient.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,742

    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    >Michael, so are the benefits to this worthwhile?

    All other things being equal (but they are not) it works fine, but I could not see that it was dramatically better.

    >Do the bees arrange the frames like I mentioned above and do they maintain this pattern in the brood boxes?

    See below.

    >The things I like about it:

    >ventilation is accomplished through convection which is regulated by the bees
    the openings for ventilation have regular screen and 1/2" mesh for critters

    But ventilation is always accomplished by the bees. through convection. The biggest advantage I see to "the warm way" is if you have single hives you can stand behind them and work them easily. Since leveling hives is a big issue and space is not that easy to come by, I'd rather put 14 on one stand, even though I end up standing in front of the hive...

    >the entrance is oriented perpendicular to the frames and away from prevailing winds

    I don't think the frames block that much wind either way. There is a gap for the bottom (or the top if you have a top entrance) that runs across anyway. Probably the frames block SOME wind, but certainly not all of it. A slatted rack probably blocks as much wind.

    >from the entrance the bees place pollen, brood then honey in that order: is this anyone's experience; does this hold true for the rest of the hive?

    In general pollen seems to end up near the entrance when you have a bottom entrance and it's true this may focus it somewhat more on one frame, but I see frames full of pollen no matter which way they go.

    >The top feeder is enclosed in a feed shim using rapid feeders which is not open to the environment and stays at colony ambient temperature.

    I do like rapid feeders especially with a bottom entrance. They are easy to refill and, while they don't hold as much as a miller feeder, they hold about all you want in order to prevent it spoiling. Especially if it's in your backyard.

    >you can work the colony from the rear and can keep the colony at (3)-8-framed boxes and remove honey frames as they are capped.

    Yes, you can work it from the rear and yes that's more convenient. I guess you are saying here that they fill the frames more completely near the front rather than the back? Once you're above the brood nest, I don't think it makes much difference as far as how they get filled. It might make some difference in the bottom box.

    >Other than all this it is pretty much the same.

    Yes. The British have a hive that is square, so the decision is simply which way to orient the cover and the bottom. All in all I prefer the warm way if there were not other factors.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Posts
    975

    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    I like the permanently attached robbing screen.

    I experimented with a Rapid Feeder. I always had a lot of bee drowning. Finally gave up on them
    --shinbone
    (3rd year, 12 hives, Zone 5b, 5400 ft, 15.8" annual rainfall)

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    Ya know it always bothers me to kill bees. I was thinking of attaching some fine nylon mesh or even the 1/8" HC to the in side of that thing....first things first though.
    Quote Originally Posted by shinbone View Post
    I like the permanently attached robbing screen.

    I experimented with a Rapid Feeder. I always had a lot of bee drowning. Finally gave up on them

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    >I experimented with a Rapid Feeder. I always had a lot of bee drowning. Finally gave up on them

    I've never seen a method of feeding syrup where some bees don't drown sooner or later. The Rapid Feeder drowned much lass than a frame feeder or a "float" style miller feeder.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    110

    Default Re: Warm Way Langstroh Hives

    This is feeder(s) I use now but I had to modify it because the bees would never drown in the feeder but the knuckleheads would crawl under the dam ang get into the reservoir when the syrup was used up and for some reason they could find they way back to the hive. It holds a lot of syrup and you can't go into the hive with syrup in it. I put a strip of 1/8" screen on the reservoir side to keep the bees on the hive side when the syrup was gone...47103a017a7b6729567aedf5a017f7dc.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    >I experimented with a Rapid Feeder. I always had a lot of bee drowning. Finally gave up on them

    I've never seen a method of feeding syrup where some bees don't drown sooner or later. The Rapid Feeder drowned much lass than a frame feeder or a "float" style miller feeder.

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