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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lawrenceville, NJ, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default wintergree-salt grease patties Varroa: Is this considered a natural treatment ?

    Hi all,
    I am new to beekeeping, however, I would to explore a chemical free approach to this art. Specifically I was looking at different ways to address varroa mites without using chemicals or medications. One of the approaches I discovered was the use of wintergree-salt grease patties (West Virgina University). It seems to be an effective way but is it a natural way? It uses salicylic acid (wintergreen) which apparently can be very dangerous (to humans), 10lm on the skin is lethal, once absorbed, it stops the heart. Hence the need to use gloves.

    I am not asking this treatment works (lots of opinion on this subject) but if it meets the "natural treatment standard", if such thing exists.

    Thank you all in advance for sharing your knowledge.
    Jean-Pierre

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    872

    Default Re: wintergree-salt grease patties Varroa: Is this considered a natural treatment ?

    From the "sticky" post at the top of this forum:
    Treatment: A substance introduced by the beekeeper into the hive with the intent of killing, repelling, or inhibiting a pest or disease afflicting the bees.

    Treatments include but are not limited to:
    Apiguard (thymol)
    Mite-away II (formic acid)
    Apistan (fluvalinate)
    Sucrocide (sucrose octanoate esters)
    Mite-A-Thol (menthol)
    Terramycin/Tetra-B (antibiotic)
    Tylan (antibiotic)
    Gardstar (permethrin)
    Fumagilin (antibiotic)
    Paramoth (p-dichlorobenzene)
    Checkmite (coumaphos)
    Oxalic Acid (dicarboxylic acid)
    Formic Acid (carboxylic acid)
    Mineral Oil (food grade mineral oil, FGMO)
    Sugar Dusting (sucrose)
    HBH (essential oils)
    MegaBee (diet formula)
    Honey Bee Healthy (feeding stimulant containing essential oils)
    Bt Aizawai (bacteria)
    Thymol (crystals, feed, or fogging)
    Essential oils (in general)
    Grease patties (Crisco etc.)
    So, yes, on this forum this is considered a "treatment".

    HTH

    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
    Posts
    5,033

    Default Re: wintergree-salt grease patties Varroa: Is this considered a natural treatment ?

    Quote Originally Posted by jpgero View Post
    I am not asking this treatment works (lots of opinion on this subject) but if it meets the "natural treatment standard",
    Name of forum: Treatment-FREE Beekeeping.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,454

    Default Re: wintergree-salt grease patties Varroa: Is this considered a natural treatment ?

    > I would to explore a chemical free approach to this art.

    You can discuss "chemical free" and "natural" treatments on the general bee forum.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Lawrenceville, NJ, USA
    Posts
    13

    Default Re: wintergree-salt grease patties Varroa: Is this considered a natural treatment ?

    Apologies to all, I will pose my question on the general forum. I wrongly assumed treatment free = no chemical treatment.
    Thanks

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    5,728

    Default Re: wintergree-salt grease patties Varroa: Is this considered a natural treatment ?

    But you were correct. Treatment free does = no chemical treatment LOL

    Are the chemicals you mention in your first post, not chemicals?
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

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