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Thread: Dipping candles

  1. #1
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    Default Dipping candles

    I want to dip several pairs of candles at once in a larger container of wax. Would it work to only have say four inches of molten wax on top of water? This would sure simplify things in my reckoning.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    Hi Vance,

    Yes, you can float the wax on water and dip this way. I would imagine you just have to make sure the wick is coated in wax first so it doesn't grab any water.

    I used distilled water with the beeswax and dipped the naturally yellow tapers in tinted beewax to change the color. I used tall clear glass flower vases and had them in another pot of water. Like a double boiler.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    Thankyou and the tall vases is a wonderful idea. Why didn't I think of those! I have a bunch.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    Also, use a tall stock pot and get the water bath as high as you can to keep the wax in the vase hot enough. It's good to control the temperatures. If the wax is too hot, the candle will not build up or it will get thinner. If the wax is not hot enough, you will get lumpy, bumpy candles. Jarring the taper will result in wrinkles. You need to be smooth!!

    As you dip, the taper will get hotter and you may need to dip it a second in cool water. Just don't dip into hot wax too frequently.....that helps a lot.

    When you get your wick primed, and even dipped again, place it on the counter (when the wax is pretty firm, but warm yet) and roll it using all your fingers. Or, I will pull the wick slightly till it is cool. This will straighten it out. After a few dips you won't have to do this anymore.

    Oh yeah, the levels of liquid in both containers is important in relation to one another. Don't want the inside one tipping due to being too light.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    One more thing.... put a wire rack or something in the bottom of the pot so the glass container is not in direct contact with the bottom.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    Quote Originally Posted by Bee Bliss View Post
    One more thing.... put a wire rack or something in the bottom of the pot so the glass container is not in direct contact with the bottom.
    AMEN!!! lol...exploding vases full of molten wax, in pots of boiling water is something to be AVOIDED!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    Boiling water bath is too hot. Beeswax melts at about 147 degrees F. Pouring temps and dipping temps differ. Dipping is probably best between 170* and 180*.

    Most of all, remember that even a wrinkled, lumpy candle will burn as well as a finely crafted smooth one.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    Thanks for added info bee bliss. There is always a way for someone to misunderstand isn't there. I Am glad you offered the help and thanks for tolerating the sniping.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    You are welcome, Vance.

    [QUOTE=Bee Bliss;948202]Also, use a tall stock pot and get the water bath as high as you can to keep the wax in the vase hot enough. It's good to control the temperatures.

    I tried to edit my post, but it is too late. As careful as I tried to be in explaining this whole thing, I would like to say that when I said the above, I was referring to water level (as in high) and not temperature which is why I mentioned the tall stock pot. I don't ever let my beeswax get over 180 degrees F.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    I just made a test run of dipped candles and they are undoubtedly the ugliest I have ever seen. I was melting beeswax to mold some various critters for my wifes quilting party this weekend so all the ladies can have their very own needle lubricator or whatever. I made the foulest smelling candles imaginable out of deer tallow when I was a young boy and I don't remember those being as ugly and misshapen as these. But, a grand daughter who I picked up sick from school is really impressed with the idea and heavenly smell of beeswax. I just bought a scrap aluminum deep and narrow pot and was able to melt wax in the glass vase on a turkey fryer burner. Only problem is that the beeswax and glass vase are still overly bouyant unless the vase is nearly full of wax. I have to add water as I get the chunks to melt down.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Dipping candles

    My first dipped beeswax candle was a very ugly candle. LOL It looked like the crookedest old gnarly wrinkled finger. It was gross, but burned well. Oh, the memories. Now that you have the ugly candle done, you are ready for the smooth ones. This is a fast learning process.

    If you have any, absolutely any, unmelted chunks in there, they will adhere to the candle when it is dipped. Was the wick not straight? What temp. did you have your wax at? Wrinkles? Pictures?

    A smooth motion is required. It also cannot be pulled too fast out of the dipping container or the new layer will slide down. Do not jar it either. Maybe all you needed to do was slow down the dipping speed and/or frequency. If you want to start over, just throw them in the vase and remelt.

    I did use a vase that was several inches taller than my stock pot and so had to keep the levels in both pots at a proper level so the wax vase did not float.

    What do YOU think went wrong? Don't give up.

    Are you using open flame? Hope not.

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