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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
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    creek county oklahoma
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    70

    Default concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    Has anyone ever put a hive in a shed, with a tube or something to the outside?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Baden Wurtemburg Germany
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    129

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    Take a look here
    http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/war.../message/22110

    this guy has put hives in his Atic

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    Erin, NY /Florence SC
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    3,361

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    I had a friend who kept them in a building with slots cut out for the entrances. It seemed liked the hives never thrived because they did not get that direct morning sun during cooler times that warms the bees up and get's them going. In the spring and the fall it was always 5-10 degrees cooler in that building than outside in the mornings I was there. I'm sure people do it successfully - just a consideration.

  4. #4
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    Mar 2011
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    Slidell, LA, USA
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    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    I've seen posts on this forum of hive houses in Europe. Pretty neat. You may do a quick search for the thread.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
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    Reno, NV
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    2,846

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    I consider the sun shining on the hives through the winter as a major source of their heat on cold nights. Now the bees being in a shed on a 100 degree July afternoon. that sounds pretty good.

    I have read where keeping bees over winter in a cellar was common practice. no idea how well those bees did but from what I can tell it was self induced disease effect that reports on losses looked like exactly what we have now. They didn't have diseases then to kill the bees so they killed them with the beekeeping methods. this is one of the main reasons I don't think that diseases today are the cause of the losses. they are just what is currently being blamed. I seriously wonder if bee losses are due to inadequate keeping methods that have simply never been improved. Losses have been consistent for well over 100 years. the reported causes are the only thing that change.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
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    5,715

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    > I consider the sun shining on the hives through the winter as a major source of their heat on cold nights.

    Hmm, where I live the sun goes away at night.

    Graham
    --- Victor Hugo - "Common sense is in spite of, not the result of, education.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Slidell, LA, USA
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    259

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    You must live south of the equator!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Warrior, Alabama
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    1,067

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    Quote Originally Posted by alblancher View Post
    You must live south of the equator!
    The earth spins in the other direction down there too!
    Old Guy in Alabama

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Slidell, LA, USA
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    259

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    No, the top part tilts toward the sun to give you daytime and then when the bottom part tilts to the sun the top part gets night time! Silly, spinning in the other direction. If that was the case our friends in Australia could cruise over for the weekend.

    BTW I'm sure they ment the latent heat held over from the sunlight would help warm the hive at night.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    collbran, co
    Posts
    504

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    i have built two observation hives in my shed wall they wintered over just fine.second winter with them.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Columbia, Missouri, usa
    Posts
    202

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    I stated several nucs last summer but the weather was so hot and dry that the nucs never added any stores. I decided to put two of the 5 frame (medium) nucs into my front porch. Since i did not want to drill a hole in the wall, I placed a 2x4 in the window with two holes in the 2x4. The sun does warm the hives up nicely on sunny days. The inside temperture of the room is usually about 55- 60 degrees F. A hole was cut in the top for the lid of a pint jar and a #8 wire mesh placed underneath. I have to refill the jar about once per monh with 1:1 sugar water. I also add a teaspoon full of Mann Lake's PRO HEALTH to a gallon of syrup to keep it from molding. I have done this for two winters with no problems excpt once in a while a bee will excape into my porch.
    Hope I can figure how to load a picture of these green nucs thru the glass window.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Columbia, Missouri, usa
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    202

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    I will try this picture again...
    Image0024.jpg

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    122

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    In the photo I see sun hitting the hive through a window.
    Any thoughts on how a hive would do in a shed or building with just a cut entrance hole, no morning sun to heat up the hive? No winter sun, except what shines into the "escape tube" or however bees are allowed to fly outside.

    Hive maintenance would be done indoors- bees that leave the hive during maintenance are now in an enclosed room, possibly in the dark- trouble.
    I'd like to try something like this due to my unforgiving winter climate, but don't see how it would actually work with a lot of stings.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
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    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    Daniel Y, are you talking about strictly winter losses or losses in general? If winter losses, yes, you can add stress to a colony through an improper way of wintering them, and there are diseases that are propagated by the mites that cause winter loss. In general though, what beekeeping methods are to blame for losses and not disease or mites? John

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    creek county oklahoma
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    70

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    >>Hive maintenance would be done indoors- bees that leave the hive during maintenance are now in an enclosed room, possibly in the dark- trouble.<<

    Dirtslinger, I was thinking about a bee escape. But most sheds aren't bee-tight anyway and I think they would go for the light and get themselves out. The reason for the bee escape would be to keep them from getting back in.

    Cdevier, I like your picture. I had something like that in mind but maybe a little more camouflaged from outside.

  16. #16
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    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
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    9,050

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    Quote Originally Posted by Dirtslinger2 View Post
    Hive maintenance would be done indoors- bees that leave the hive during maintenance are now in an enclosed room, possibly in the dark- trouble.
    I'd like to try something like this due to my unforgiving winter climate, but don't see how it would actually work with a lot of stings.
    I don't see the dark as a problem, they live in the dark. Maybe you could have a reverse trap out screen to allow the bee to return to the hive if they get outside the hive and into the room.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Vancouver, BC
    Posts
    122

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    I get the feeling someone has never tried beekeeping in the dark then? They crawl along ground and crawl up your pants. It was one of my first beekeeping lessons learned, ouch.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    965

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    Dirtslinger, are you actually in Van, or up in the Cascades?

    I wish I had the warm temps they enjoy btw Bellingham & Coquitlam...but happy I don't have to endure so many fewer flight days b/c of rain.

    A bee escape cone pointing into the hive over an entrance opening indoors will let the bees back in, but none out.

    if winter warmth is an issue due t elevation, closeting the hives in with foamboard will trap hive warmth, (the guys in alberta actually have to *cool* their overwintering sheds) and if more is needed a 100 W light bulb on a timer or thermostat would probably serve well.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Chilhowee, MO
    Posts
    94

    Default Re: concealing a colony in a shed or garage

    Quote Originally Posted by pgayle View Post
    >>Hive maintenance would be done indoors- bees that leave the hive during maintenance are now in an enclosed room, possibly in the dark- trouble.<<

    Dirtslinger, I was thinking about a bee escape. But most sheds aren't bee-tight anyway and I think they would go for the light and get themselves out. The reason for the bee escape would be to keep them from getting back in.



    Cdevier, I like your picture. I had something like that in mind but maybe a little more camouflaged from outside.
    why not put.. a one way bee excape into the side or top of the hive.. instead of having it set for bees to go out and not in.. turn it around..so they can go in.. not out.. that might work.. once in a while one might get out that way.. but it should work..
    Smart man knows that the road is a one way street..
    Wise man looks both ways anyhow.......

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