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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Richmond, Illinois, USA
    Posts
    25

    Default Is there a downside to EZ-Frames?

    You know, the all-plastic frames with wax-coated plastic foundation. Is there a good reason to avoid them, or to prefer them over assembling my own traditional wood frames?

    Yes I'm a noob, looking to place an order for my first hives. Any opinions welcome. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,503

    Default Re: Is there a downside to EZ-Frames?

    I don't know anything about ez frames having never held one. I do use a lot of mann lake pf xxx frames for deeps and mediums. I get excellent service out of them. I find the bees don't deal with them noticably treat them different from wax foundation. The sure fire way to get a perfect frame of any kind is to place them between two frames of capped brood in the middle of the nest. Other than that, draw them as a full box at a time after the bees are working on the outside frames of the box below. . Place one frame of brood or capped honey frame in the middle to pull the bees up into that box. Opinions vary, but that is my experieince

  3. #3

    Default Re: Is there a downside to EZ-Frames?

    The only thing I do not like about the 1 piece plastic frames is the hiding spots all around the edges for small hive beetles. I used to use all 1 piece frames but since small hive beetles are overwintering so well here now I have switched to wood frame and plastic foundation.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Camino, CA
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Is there a downside to EZ-Frames?

    The biggest issue I have with them is when they're full of honey in late summer and into the fall they flex way to much which breaks the capping off the honey and squeezes some out. This flex happens to a certain extent with brood too but doesn't appear to be a real issue. It's my experience that you have to be a lot more gentle with these when they've been propolized down or they can break and I've been slowly replacing it with wood frame plastic foundation. All that said... I have one hive that still has two frames of it in a double deep and those frames are the only place the queen will lay her winter brood and it doesn't matter where in the hive those frames are they're the first place she lays. Last season I moved them to one side of the upper deep in hopes she would stop laying in them and I could remove them but she continued to follow them. I finally gave up and put them in bottom middle and that's where the cluster spent the winter.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Belpre,Ohio, USA
    Posts
    1,082

    Default Re: Is there a downside to EZ-Frames?

    In response to Dan's reply, I have a friend who used a hot glue gun and filled in the edge webbing on the plastic frames to prevent the beetles from hiding there, takes some time to do but it worked very well.
    Bill...in Southeast Ohio

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    956

    Thumbs Up Re: Is there a downside to EZ-Frames?

    Quote Originally Posted by pine_ridge_farms View Post
    The only thing I do not like about the 1 piece plastic frames is the hiding spots all around the edges for small hive beetles -snip-
    Quote Originally Posted by WWW View Post
    -snip- I have a friend who used a hot glue gun and filled in the edge webbing on the plastic frames to prevent the beetles from hiding there, takes some time to do but it worked very well.
    SHB refuge, weight and sag are down sides of the all plastic frames. HTH
    Lee Burough
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Weeki Wachee, Florida,USA
    Posts
    1,822

    Default Re: Is there a downside to EZ-Frames?

    I prefer plastic frames and foundation. I use pierco and can't get rid of the wood frames fast enough. If you have SHB they will hide where they can no matter what frames you use. IMHO they are just easier to spot and kill when they hide on plastic.
    Plastic is cleanner, cheaper and easier to work with in my limited experience. I tried to run a double deep of wood frames....sold it nothing but a pain to check. It seems you need a crowbar to pull a frame and a hammer to get it back in.

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