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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Clatskanie, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    Any one know of any tests with copper be done for mite controlÂ… and old Beekeeper said he picked some free copper screen for his hives. He uses it for bottom boards and feeds he makesÂ… He told me that the mites in the hives with the copper screen have dropped to all most zero Â… IÂ’m going to try itÂ… but I donÂ’t check my hives like I know some of you do, and would like to have some one give it a try and let me know.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    My "Golden Rule of Beekeeping" may apply here:

    Is it food safe, and will harm my bees?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Clatskanie, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    He just has the copper metal screen in the bottom of four of his 20 his hives itÂ’s got to be better than aluminum, or galvanized screen. He has top feeders on two hives with copper screen on them its food safe and bee safe as far as I know. He is not feeding them copper.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

    Post

    A copper screen should not effect honey whatsoever. Feeding them copper could be very bad. We need copper in our diet, but to much leads to very severe neurological problems. Copper is a very popular metal for household plumbing. Copper containers are food safe.

    For it to work, however, would mean that the copper is "poisoning" the mites. Possible I suppose. Excess copper is a neurotoxin. I guess the mites would have to be extremely sensitive to copper.

    Disclaimer: I'm no chemist or scientist.

    [size="1"][ June 21, 2006, 08:39 AM: Message edited by: MichaelW ][/size]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    >A copper screen should not effect honey whatsoever . . .
    Any test results??

    >Feeding them copper could be very bad . . .
    Any test results?

    >to much leads to very severe neurological problems . . .
    What do "we" and mites and honey bees have in common?

    >Copper containers are food safe . . .
    Where can I buy some?

    >Copper is a very popular metal for household plumbing . . .

    And without the coating that forms inside the pipe (protects the water from exposure), how much copper would be drinking?

    >would mean that the copper is "poisoning" the mites . . .
    Does it poison or REPEL mites?

    >Disclaimer: I'm no chemist or scientist . . .
    Me either [img]smile.gif[/img]

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Clatskanie, Oregon, USA
    Posts
    93

    Post

    He said he did not see a lot of dead of dieing mite on the white sticky paperÂ… He just does not see any mites maybe one of twoÂ… but in the other hives we see about 10 to 15 mites not bad but a lot more.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

    Post

    >>Copper containers are food safe . . .
    >Where can I buy some?

    Haven't you ever heard of a copper kettle

    >Feeding them copper could be very bad . . .
    Any test results?
    If you feed them copper, in some form, and it contaminates your honey, then you eat the copper and your getting more copper than you probably should. Thats just logic.

    >And without the coating that forms inside the pipe (protects the water from exposure), how much copper would be drinking?

    http://www.ext.vt.edu/pubs/waterqual...44/442-944.pdf
    Evaluation of
    Household
    Water Quality
    in
    Suffolk, Virginia

    "Copper. The EPA health standard for copper in public drinking water supplies is 1.3 mg/L,
    the maximum level recommended to protect people from acute gastrointestinal illness. Even
    lower levels of dissolved copper may give water a bitter or metallic taste and produce bluegreen
    stains on plumbing fixtures. Consequently, EPA has established an SMCL for copper of
    1.0 mg/L in household water.
    Two samples in both the both the tap water and raw water groups exceeded the recommended
    health level of 1.3 mg/L. Four samples in each group exceeded the SMCL of 1.0 mg/L.
    Since natural levels of copper in groundwater are low, and the primary contributor of copper in
    drinking water is corrosion of copper water pipes and fittings, low copper levels were expected,
    even in the case of tap water samples, assuming that water lines were flushed properly prior to
    sampling, of which a number apparently were not."

    Seeing PVC can leach;
    Di(2-ethylhexyl)adipate;
    Tetrachloroethylene;
    Vinyl chloride;
    http://www.vdh.virginia.gov/dw/files...appendix_O.pdf
    I'll take my plumbing in copper thank you very much. I just ran about 200 feet at my house for that reason.

    >Disclaimer: I'm no chemist or scientist . . .

    my disiclaimer was ment to void me from any obligation to provide supporting peer reviewed evidence.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    The only copper kettle I have experience w/ is lined w/ tin to prevent the contents from coming into contact w/ the copper.

    Iron, brass, zinc, and COPPER will discolor beeswax. What are its effect on honey?

    >my disiclaimer was ment to void me from any obligation to provide supporting peer reviewed evidence . . .
    Sorry youre upset.

    [size="1"][ June 21, 2006, 03:26 PM: Message edited by: Dave W ][/size]

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Knoxville, TN
    Posts
    1,933

    Post

    "...is lined w/ tin .."

    ...hmm, true, good point.

    I still say the effect of bees crawling over copper screen will have no effect on the honey or bee health. Its not like sticking a block of lead in there.

    For the mites, if it repels' them are you thinking some kind of electro magnetic hoody doody?

    I don't get upset over beesource. I should have added some [img]smile.gif[/img] 's after my response. [img]smile.gif[/img]

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Evansville, IN, USA
    Posts
    2,837

    Post

    >electro magnetic hoody doody . . .

    Now we are talking! Lets wrap bare copper wire around our hives and hope for a LIGHTNING STRIKE [img]smile.gif[/img] Mites all gone [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Actually I was thinking about how a copper bracelet "repel" aches and pains [img]smile.gif[/img]

    Maybe we could just put the bracelet in our smoker and let a "cool cloud green smoke" do the job. [img]smile.gif[/img]

    I think this "copper thing" needs more research . . . please send money!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,481

    Post

    The problem with the lightening strike method is the wait for that to happen. I still think my dynamite method is more effective or at least more reliable. You just set a stick of dynamite off in the box... No more Varroa
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    North Hills, CA USA
    Posts
    453

    Post

    To get off the subject as some of the threads do from time to time, have any of you seen the current price of copper pipe, WHOW WHOW.
    Walt

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Fauquier Co. Virginia
    Posts
    15

    Post

    We use copper in our stills around here....never had any problems....hic up!

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Inver Grove, MN
    Posts
    1,462

    Post

    >"You just set a stick of dynamite off in the box"

    I could agree with no more box and probably no more bees, but no more varroa? I wonder.
    Linux - World domination through world cooperation

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    >You just set a stick of dynamite off in the box... No more Varroa

    What's the average recovery time before honey is again flowing into the hive with your method?

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Caledon, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    307

    Post

    Copper is one of lifes mixed blessings.
    We all know we use it in plumbing.

    For years it was used in the pressure treatment of wood, but it was so toxic that it got banned from school yards and public park playgrounds because of the risk of exposure to kids. ( in Toronto at least )

    It was also used in another form as a bottom paint for boats, especially in salt water, to keep of banrnacle etc, that is until the EPA got on the case and found it so toxic to marine life that it is now banned in the US.

    It is also used in very low doses in some swimming pool chemicals as a sanitizer supplement with very weird results. Some blonde gals have their hair turn green from swimming in it. Stains pool decks etc.

    So it all depends on the formulation. I would keep it well away from my bees until someone did some pretty good studies to show it safe in honey and for the bees.

    So it all
    "hobby farm" is an oxymoron
    Brent Roberts

  18. #18
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Raleigh, North Carolina
    Posts
    3,598

    Post

    brent,

    I'm not a scientist, so I could be wrong (I have been before [img]smile.gif[/img] }
    but

    >For years it was used in the pressure treatment of wood, but it was so toxic that it got banned from school yards and public park playgrounds because of the risk of exposure to kids. ( in Toronto at least )

    I was reading about pressure treated wood recently and what I got from it was that arsenic is what they got rid of and they still use copper

    http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuild...ges/h00127.asp

    according to that article they actually use a lot more

    >It was also used in another form as a bottom paint for boats, especially in salt water, to keep of banrnacle etc, that is until the EPA got on the case and found it so toxic to marine life that it is now banned in the US.

    lead is what they got rid of, copper is what they use now. I have a can of Pettit Trinidad (top notch bottom paint) in my hand, cuprouse oxide is the main ingredient

    http://www.shipstore.com/SS/HTML/PET/PETTRINIDAD.html

    don't get me wrong, copper is toxic, but it's used a lot of places (not in my beehives [img]smile.gif[/img] )

    Dave

    ps, I just realized you're from Canada, the rules may be different there

    [size="1"][ June 24, 2006, 07:05 PM: Message edited by: drobbins ][/size]

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Fredericksburg, Va
    Posts
    795

    Post

    Copper teapot are not lined.
    Copper Kettles (used for making apple butter etc.) are not lined. The only copper lining that I had seen are the modern copper clad pots.

    Most of the new-age health braclets that you see advertized on TV are not much more that twisted copper wire that you wear.

    And cooper in stills is the 'only approved' configuration - the problems came from people using old radiators which contaied lead as a cheap alternative.

    If copper was not save we would have been dead long ago.

    A piece of copper wire can even keep slugs out of a flower bed (the salt in slug slime causes the copper to set up electric shock in the slug).

    There are lots of things to fear but why fear fear itself.

    Food safe - what do you need a governerment stamp?
    Bee all you can Bee!
    http://www.hamiltonapiary.net

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska
    Posts
    1,649

    Post

    >I was reading about pressure treated wood recently and what I got from it ........ they still use copper

    Interesting. I just replaced some wood on the back deck of my house with pressure treated lumber. The bees seemed to really enjoy crawling around on the lumber.

    6--2x4's
    3--2x8's
    1--4x4

    3 lbs. 12d nails

    $115

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