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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Nacogdoches,TX,USA
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: ECO Wood Treatment?

    did the 22 mediums and 8 screened bottom board with 1 gal and had ECO left doing inside and out since seams easier to do that way

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Park City Ky
    Posts
    2,195

    Default Re: ECO Wood Treatment?

    Looks like an easy test would be...

    Take a sample of plywood, and pressboard, All from the same sheet. Treat a couple of samples with ECO, paint (or stain) a couple, and leave a couple as is. Lay them out and see what happens.

    I may just do this, this Spring.

    cchoganjr
    Last edited by Cleo C. Hogan Jr; 01-19-2014 at 05:36 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    3,340

    Default Re: ECO Wood Treatment?

    There is a big difference between waterproofing the wood and preventing fungi eating the wood. Unsealed pine around here is going to have a short life if not waterproofed, we have very wide swings in temperature and humidity, and unsealed wood will change size and shape repeatedly. This is not an issue in areas which have relatively low humidity all year and do not suffer from weeks long bouts of damp weather.

    This is compounded by the fact that the bees will waterproof the interior of the hive in short order by coating it with propolis -- the result is that one side stays at equilibrium and the other varies. Warps and splits are inevitable.

    I might use eco-treatment first, then linseed oil and primer and paint, as I don't intend to keep making boxes forever. With some luck I'll be up to 4 hives this spring, and six is about where I want to be until I have time to consider going to a profit making operation. I would not depend on it making my boxes last decades around here, and I know that paint will.

    Peter

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Logan, UT
    Posts
    26

    Default Re: ECO Wood Treatment?

    I just started out last year, and I went with this product after much research. I did the insides and outsides. I had a great first year, and I like the effect. The longer the wood is in the sun/rain, the darker they get, and I like the natural look of weathered wood that it provides. I do have one box that is warping, but I think where I bought them they didn't glue the corners.

    So this year, I'm planning on getting a couple more hives going. My plan is to buy the corners from Eco Bee Boxes and use cedar. So my question is do I need to treat the cedar with the Eco wood treatment, or can cedar just go a natural?

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Bloomfield,KY
    Posts
    342

    Default Re: ECO Wood Treatment?

    [QUOTE=Moots;1046746]Dave and Sharp, thanks for the responses, very encouraging...

    Sharp, One question, you say you just dip the outside of your boxes. "Supposedly" ECO is safe for the inside of the box and won't bother the bees. Curious is there some reason you don't dip the inside or is it just out of an abundance of caution.

    This is the latest decision of this project that I'm waffling back and forth with....

    I think dipping the entire box would be easier and provide a little more protection for the box...While dipping just the inside would be a little more "playing it safe" for the bees?

    Technically, doing just the inside will use less product, but that's not really factoring into my decision.[/QUOTE/}

    It's just an abundance of caution on my part.
    "Of all God's creatures, only the honeybee improves its environment and preys on no other species."--Haydon Brown

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: ECO Wood Treatment?

    @oblib, the comments regarding the effectiveness of Eco Wood Treatment on pine are probably from our website. We sell Eco from our webstore here in New Zealand to customers in both New Zealand and Australia, including to a number of beekeepers.

    The reason for our comments regarding 'pine' is that the New Zealand timber supply is heavily dominated by Pinus Radiata (Monterey Pine) grown in our country using selectively bred high growth factor trees. This timber grows very quickly in our relatively benign climate with trees being harvested at around 25 years old. The timber produced is fairly soft with low natural durability, with that used in exterior and/or ground contacting applications needing to be pressure treated with CCA (Chromated Copper Arsenate) preservative to provide an acceptable lifetime of use.

    The toxicity of CCA obviously presents problems for the environmentally minded, certified Organic properties and sensitive applications, such as in beehives. We understandably have a regular flow of enquiries from potential customers who think that Eco will provide a level of preservation for otherwise untreated radiata pine similar to that provided by CCA. The contrasting toxicity levels mean that this will not be the case. This is the reason for the 'pine' comment on our website.

    Our Eco customer base here in New Zealand comprises mainly those using cypressus macrocarpa, cedar or other locally available timbers of good natural durability, or to those who are prepared to compromise longevity for lower toxicity than CCA. Our beekeeper Eco customers fall either side of these choices using pine or lesser known indigenous woods.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    383

    Default Re: ECO Wood Treatment?

    I had VERY bad experience with Eco Wood Treatment and would caution anyone in a humid environment from using it with pine boxes. Here in New England, I had 9-10 Mann Lake select boxes warp and crack on me last year. I telephoned the representative in the US or Canada before treatment, and was told it wouldn't be an issue - but it was.

    YMMV. I can't recommend it based upon my experience. If you do a search here on BeeSource, you'll see there are a lot of people with similarly bad experiences.

    Tony P.
    There must be a harder way to do that... let me find it for you.

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