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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Edinburgh, UK
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    Default Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Please see the LINK below to an account of the devastating collapse of over 2,000 bee colonies in California.

    The eye-witness account was provided to me by the bee-farmer in question, who arrived in California with 3,150 healthy hives on November 1st 2012. All of the hives were examined and 'passed' as fit for the Almond Pollination - which takes place in February (right now). The inspection is critical, since each healthy hive receives a pollination fee of up to $200 and the almond-growers will not pay for anything that is less than healthy.

    The bee-farmer in question had contracted to supply 3,000 hives at a fee of up to $200 per hive, so conceivaby he stood to earn $600,000 for one month's work pollinating almonds. He has already lost 2/3rds of that planned income.

    More than 2,000 of his colonies died while waiting for the almond pollination to start. They did not die as a result of pesticides they encountered in the California winter (November/ December). Rather they died because of the systemic neonicotinoid insecticides, and other pesticides they had been exposed to back in the Midwest, from May to September, among the pesticide-treated crops of soybeans, corn and other crops.

    The article can be downloaded from Google Docs here:

    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B7FC...it?usp=sharing

    Having possibly lost $400,000 worth of bees, and an additional loss of pollination income - for the same amount $400,000 - it is questionable whether his business can ever recover. There may be hundreds of other American bee-farmers suffering a similar fate this season, since, according to USDA, more than 240 million acres of American crops were treated with systemic neonicotinids in 2012. Of that - around 92 million acres of GM corn were treated with clothianidin, as well as being blasted with roundup and fungicides.

    Many of the 1.5 million hives brought to California from all over America for the almond plination will have been exposed to the same hyper-toxic, bee killing pesticides. So this year may prove to be a watershed both for bee-farmers and for the almond industry - as many people have already commented.

  2. #2
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    Feb 2013
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    Rochester, NY
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    26

    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Let me get this straight---

    It's an "eyewitness" report, but the name isn't mentioned, plus all kinds of hard data
    The bees arrived in CA in November
    The bees get sprayed in CA
    Bees die over a course of months in CA
    But last summers midwest crop is blamed
    Too few facts and too much conjecture
    WHO wrote this article? I'm not seeing actual names.
    Was this meant to be circulated to influence people?

  3. #3
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    Millbury, MA, USA
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Just someone with an agenda and can't back them up with facts.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    No it is an honest account by a bee farmer who is in California right now, and this is his analysis of what has happened to his bees.

    The bees cannot have been killed by any pesticides in the almonds because the 2000 hives died before they went into the almonds. They were independently inspected and declared healthy on November 1st; 2,158 hives were dead when inspected again on February 5th. Those are the facts.

    It is entirely up to the bee-farmer in question when he chooses to go public and put his name to it. I feel that he WILL go public in the next fwe weeks. For the moment he is in a difficult position; he still has to work his remaining hives in the almonds and he has to deal with the commercial aspects of the business.

    He has issued the article in this way to encourage other bee-farmers to come forward and tell what has been happening every year since 2003. The fact that 10,000,000 colonies have been lost, and apart from Dave Hackenberg, almost nobody has 'gone public' should tell you something about the kind of pressures that are being brought to bear: politically, commercially and socially.

    In conclusion, the article speaks for itself. It's a hypothesis - from a man who has just been financially ruined.

    It is entirely up to him what he chooses to do next. He has shared this 'for the public good' - and can have no other motive. Nobody is paying him for this.

  5. #5
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    Jul 2006
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    Worcester County, Massachusetts
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Quote Originally Posted by borderbeeman View Post
    No it is an honest account by a bee farmer who is in California right now, and this is his analysis of what has happened to his bees.
    Can you clarify? It looks like there are 2 paragraphs that are "eye witness account"....the vast bulk is someone (you?) writing your own copy...referring to the beekeeper in the third person, and referring to the beekeeper as your "correspondent".

    What have the bees been eating since November? Has their feed (I'm assuming HFCS) been tested for HMF? For other toxins?

    Who wrote the copy?

    deknow
    The perils of benefactors; The blessings of parasites; Blindness blindness and sight -Joni Mitchell 'Shadows and Light'

  6. #6
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    Edinburgh, UK
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    It is actually all his text. I merely took his personal eye-witness account and translated it into a 'third person' account. I have no experience of bee-farming, merely a hobby beekeeper, who used to keep 10 hives - before I was surrounded by neonic treated canola. Now I am down to three hives, and two of them are so-so.

    I know nothing about the practicalities of American bee-farmng, and far less about migratory bee-farming, so I assure you I have not added or subtracted a single fact as related to me by the person who experienced this. I do not have sufficient knowledge of how bee-farming works in the USA to be able to invent or embellish any facts; it is simply beyond my experience.

    If you want, I will ask him what the bees were fed and pass on his reply.

  7. #7
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    Feb 2006
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    Herrick, SD USA
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    I have no doubt this man honestly believes pesticides were a factor, and he may well be correct but evidence of residues and exposure would be critical to establishing a cause and effect here. Lots and lots of things can cause bees to die through the winter. It requires objective analysis to make a determination. If death through illegally applied pesticides can be determined to be a factor then there could potentially be culpability and a case brought against someone, if the cause was determined to be something like varroa or resulting viruses then there would not. I personally know of one excellant beekeeper who has no doubt that foliar spraying of bees he had near sunflowers this summer greatly weakened his hives. Sunflowers are routinely aerial sprayed for many different pests, he claimed all his bees near sunflowers were weak and all of his other hives came through the summer very strong (even though there would have been potential neonic exposure to both groups of bees). He made a pretty convincing case to me particularly since I have had similar experiences through the years near sunflower fields. I bring this up as a reminder that neonics were developed to alleviate the very real problems of foliar spraying that pretty much just kills every bug in the field, it's a real sledge hammer approach that is still being used on some crops such as sunflowers where there are no other alternative like systemic neonics.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  8. #8
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    havana fl
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    I bring this up as a reminder that neonics were developed to alleviate the very real problems of foliar spraying that pretty much just kills every bug in the field, it's a real sledge hammer approach that is still being used on some crops such as sunflowers where there are no other alternative like systemic neonics.
    Yep spraying kills bees in the fields. Neonics kill subsequent generations of bees in the hive.
    Im really not that serious

  9. #9
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    May 2002
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    My bees were in California all year, not exposed to agricultural spraying or crops, only residential, and they died also. I'm inclined to chalk up my loses to lack of treatments, mite overload and subsequent viruses.

  10. #10
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    Dec 2006
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    Thumbs down Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Quote Originally Posted by borderbeeman View Post
    Many of the 1.5 million hives brought to California from all over America for the almond plination will have been exposed to the same hyper-toxic, bee killing pesticides. .
    Yep, mine have been expose to the same thing here in Calif where I live, mine are doing fine over all, sure which they would post some more threads like this one.
    NUTRA-BEE feed supplements

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Sorry but you have obviously NOT read and understood the article. His bees have NOT been exposed to pesticides in California. They were brought to California the last week in october and inspected, passed as healthy on November 1st. The 2,150 colonies died BEFORE they were exposed to any pesticides in California since they were parked in beeyards, not in the almonds. They were waiting to go into the Almonds in early February but 2,150 hives were found dead and empty of bees in the week of February 1st-5th. I guess he discovered this when he went to load the bees for transport from the holding yards into the almonds. He says that he had to combine as many as six remnant clusters to make a single viable hive; so the 900 he salvaged are mostly damaged and weak.

    The 2,100 dead hives not die of varroa or any obvious pathogen which leaves piles of dead bees in the hive.
    The bee-farmer's hypothesis - drawn from his 30 odd years of experience, is that they were killed by the pesticides they had collected and stored in soybean pollen and corn pollen, back in the Midwest, in July and August respectively.

    He believes that the bees stored this pollen and then worked down into it in October, November - and the combined effects of multiple exposures to neonics, cyhalothrins, fungicides and herbicides - stored in the pollen and bee-bread, had the effect of stopping the production of enough 'winter bees' to see the colony through the winter.

    You don't have to agree with any of this, it's just one man's experience, and his attempt to make sense of a pattern that has affected thousands and thousands of beekeepers in Europe, Australia, South America and the USA.
    Last edited by borderbeeman; 02-21-2013 at 07:02 AM.

  12. #12
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    Feb 2012
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    San Mateo, Ca, USA
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    California had a odd winter this year. A 3 week cold snap in January really did a number on a lot of the hives here.

  13. #13
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    Sep 2011
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    Skiff, Alberta, CA
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    The good news is he knows where NOT to put his bees next season.

  14. #14
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    Jan 2003
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    So, he had contracted these hives for $200 back in November? Oh wait, it says they were contracted for UP TO $200 per hive, makes for easier math in the story using $200 for them all.

    How many here contracted their hives for $200 back in November?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  15. #15
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    St. Albans, Vermont
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    So the colonies were strong in November, after going through a massive drought in the mid-West this past summer. And the bees crashed by mid-winter due to neonics? Sounds about right except the neonic part.

    How about an alternative explanation that seems to me much more credible. Colonies under drought conditions can't raise winter bees, and populous colonies of old bees don't survive the winter.

  16. #16
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    May 2010
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    Spokane, Washington, USA
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    734

    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    He wouldn't be complaining if he knocked the mites and gave them the proper nutrition back in August...
    Lot of things in the article don't sound right.

  17. #17
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    Sep 2012
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    Saint Louis, Missouri
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Palmer View Post
    So the colonies were strong in November, after going through a massive drought in the mid-West this past summer. And the bees crashed by mid-winter due to neonics? Sounds about right except the neonic part.

    How about an alternative explanation that seems to me much more credible. Colonies under drought conditions can't raise winter bees, and populous colonies of old bees don't survive the winter.
    That would be my guess as well... from my perspective of the 2012 season here in MO. Some queens just stopped laying during the string of 100+ days. Spring was great, but it was a tough summer, particularly for weak colonies.

    http://www.climatecentral.org/blogs/...-temperatures/
    Disclaimer: I've never been a bee.

  18. #18
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    Stilwell, KS
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    It's hard to trust and article that cant even get some basic facts straight:

    Almonds make up more than 825,000 acres of California’s Central Valley generating
    more cash than both the California wine and tourism industries combined.

    The forecast is based on an estimated 740,000 bearing acres. Almonds rank as California's No. 1 tree nut crop with a production value of $2.3 billion last season:
    http://westernfarmpress.com/tree-nut...ther-good-year




    Tourism annually generates more than $75 billion in direct travel spending for the state’s economy:
    http://www.destinationanalysts.com/c...california.htm



    California wine has a $51.8 billion impact on the state $103 Billion on the US Economy:
    http://www.wineevents-calendar.com/c...mpact_on_state

    Since when is 2.3 > 75 + 51.8 ?

    The un-named eye witness can't even add 2 numbers.
    Honey Badger Don't Care ಠ_ಠ ~=[,,_,,]:3

  19. #19
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    Jan 2010
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    Stromness, Scotland
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    Thumbs Up Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    Quote Originally Posted by borderbeeman View Post
    The article can be downloaded from Google Docs here:

    https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B7FC...it?usp=sharing
    Thank you for the report, Bbman.

    I just wish more beekeepers had the guts to write up their story and go public. - But obviously they fear criticism and loss of business.

    A look at this thread so far shows exactly what is thrown at those that dare to speak out. The pro neonic propaganda machine uses it's dirtiest tricks to discredit those who go against the mighty chemical industry, as they fear massive losses when these products get banned.

    A call to all those posters who demand to see the name of the author of the report: identify yourselves so that we can check your credentials!

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Eye witness to colony collapse: Bee-farmer loses 2,000 hives in one month

    The pro neonic propaganda machine uses it's dirtiest tricks to discredit those who go against the mighty chemical industry, as they fear massive losses when these products get banned.

    A call to all those posters who demand to see the name of the author of the report: identify yourselves so that we can check your credentials!
    I am not pro neonic. It's just that they are so much better than the organophosphates and,having been a farmer, I know how important insecticides can be. I also have not seen any real evidence that the neonics are that bad for bees, both in my own bees and in studies.

    I'm pretty well exposed if you click on my profile or go to my web site. Probably more transparent than you are!

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