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  1. #101
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Danielson, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I tired the newspaper route and it definitely didn't work. George Scott recommends sprinkling right on the top bars and cluster. The trial was done late in the season and with biologicals timing is everything. I did have the same type of results as the blogger but that doesn't mean it's ineffective. As stated before we need more research.

    Byron

  2. #102
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Munster Ontario
    Posts
    194

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I am still proceeding with my trial in the spring. I will share my results.

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Munster Ontario
    Posts
    194

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    This is an interesting video showing the pseudo scorpions killing varroa. Does anyone breed them in sufficient numbers to use as a treatment? As Michael Bush pointed out, they already exist in the hives, and this video is just as compelling as the ones we have seen on Ss.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXzifp38vjA

  4. #104
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Munster Ontario
    Posts
    194

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Someone is at least looking at how the pseudoscorpions breed. Not sure if anyone has figured out how to breed them in numbers.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tmDmIwGFkc

  5. #105
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Hi everyone,
    Things are going on as planned and proper research will begin this year.
    A few major trials will begin in Spring across Canada and USA. I will send an update now and then. A paper will be published in the end of course, but I expect promising results to share early on, judging by the feedback we have collected so far.
    Cheers.

  6. #106
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Schilde, Flanders, Belgium
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    AJSpencer?
    Anyone?
    Any updates?
    I tried Stratiolaelaps scimitus in some hives with DWV half may. Symptoms gone and colonies still thriving...
    Repeated treatment half september. Results of this small non-scientific experiment next spring...

    Luc P. (BE)

  7. #107
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Quote Originally Posted by imkeer View Post
    AJSpencer?
    Anyone?
    Any updates?
    I tried Stratiolaelaps scimitus in some hives with DWV half may. Symptoms gone and colonies still thriving...
    Repeated treatment half september. Results of this small non-scientific experiment next spring...

    Luc P. (BE)
    Hey Luc P.,
    Yes, our main trial has proven to knock down the varroa numbers to 25% compared to the control. Chemical treatment comparison only dropped to 75% of the control. So, we know it works, but we need to do more work on how many mites should be applied, etc. Not always is more better, so we need to nail down a number. Will keep posted.
    Adam

  8. #108
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,585

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    What chemical treatment was used for comparison?
    --shinbone
    (4th year, Zone 5b, 10/12 hives survived W'14)

  9. #109
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,860

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I treated a few in spring, hives held up pretty well but I did not have the time to reapply in summer when I wanted too. I re-applied in august to one of the original hives, we'll see how it goes. The other hives, I treated one with a single round of OA, the other probably should get one, and the 4th hive was in full mite collapse come September.

  10. #110
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Quote Originally Posted by shinbone View Post
    What chemical treatment was used for comparison?
    It is whatever the apiary would normally use, so they were called "normal" hives. There were control hives with no treatment whatsoever, Ss hives, and normal hives. The normally used chemicals were formic acid, oxalic acid, ApiVar strips.

    In short the data for mean varroa mites counted in 24 hours on sticky board per colony:
    Normal: 17
    Control: 9
    Ss: 4

    48 colonies were used, 16 each.
    More details will come soon. I've only received the draft.
    Adam

  11. #111

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Quote Originally Posted by c10250 View Post
    How about putting a little moss under the SBB to give them something to eat when all the varroa are gone??
    In case no one mentioned it;
    Phil Chandler has build a thing called Eco-floor in his top bar hives. They are simply deep floors filled with aged wood chips to provide substrate to various mites living in the colony. This Eco-floor also acts as a sponge to suck up condensation. Its still being tested but it sure does replicate the hollow tree floor with lots of debris. I will be testing this in a few of my hives. Of course I dont treat against Varroa because treatments would also kill off Ss.

  12. #112
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    49,133

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I experimented with trying to provide a place for detritus in a hive back in 2002. I was never happy with the results. It seems like a good idea, but in practice it's rather tricky. Either you give the bees access in which case they clean it out, or you keep the bees away from it, in which case their enemies can hide there. In a tree it sort of happens naturally. It starts out with rot in the bottom. The bees are working at cleaning things up and propolizing everything. Things fall to the floor (uncapping, dropped wax scales, dropped pollen etc.) ants go after the pollen. Mites go after smaller stuff. Comb is being built down and there is typically some gap between the detritus and the comb. It's harder to arrange in a movable comb hive...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  13. #113
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Totnes, Devon, England
    Posts
    1,020

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    My approach has been to use semi-rotten wood chips, which have been stacked on bare soil for at least one month to attract soil-dwelling mites, such as Stratiolelaps. This material is then added to an open trough, and the surface of the material forms the floor of the hive, and to which bees have unrestricted access. The wood chips are too heavy for bees to remove (unlike the wood shavings I tried initially) and the only problem has been keeping them sufficiently damp to maintain a population of mites, earwigs, etc. I am experimenting with lining the trough with a semi-permeable material.

    Too early to draw any conclusions, but the hives that have these floors seem to be thriving. I haven't done any mite counts, so I can make no claims on that score at the moment.
    The Barefoot Beekeeper http://www.biobees.com

  14. #114
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    17

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Good ideas. Though Ss may not be "the answer", getting chemicals out of the hives will allow whatever naturally occurring predators or parasites to varroa to enter the hives without dying immediately.

  15. #115
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Schilde, Flanders, Belgium
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    The Niagara Beeway beeks posted their 2014 report:http://www.niagarabeeway.com/varroa-...14-report.html
    Looks promising!

    They write about doses of 200 ml/hive. Does anyone know how many Ss are in 200 ml of Bionomics Ss? (I can buy Ss in Belgium and one tube contains 10000 of them.) I read somewhere 1000 Ss/hive would be a good dose for one treatment, so now I would like to know if these beekeepers apply the same dose or not...

  16. #116
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Sacramento, CA, USA
    Posts
    3,860

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Tried them on 4 hives, all collapsed to mites. I did two treatments, one in late spring, and one in early fall.

  17. #117
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Casey, Il, USA
    Posts
    2,369

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    These things winter in the ground correct? What about a 12-18 in bottomless box settling directly on the ground with a screen top as a hive stand . This would give the space needed for separation, give the SS a place to go in the winter and prevent comb building below the bottom box

  18. #118
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Posts
    1,585

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    JRG13 - thanks for the report. Sorry you lost your hives.
    --shinbone
    (4th year, Zone 5b, 10/12 hives survived W'14)

  19. #119
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Gainesville Florida
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Quote Originally Posted by imkeer View Post
    The Niagara Beeway beeks posted their 2014 report:http://www.niagarabeeway.com/varroa-...14-report.html
    Looks promising!

    They write about doses of 200 ml/hive. Does anyone know how many Ss are in 200 ml of Bionomics Ss? (I can buy Ss in Belgium and one tube contains 10000 of them.) I read somewhere 1000 Ss/hive would be a good dose for one treatment, so now I would like to know if these beekeepers apply the same dose or not...
    It is listed as 25,000 per L, so 200 ml would be 5000.

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