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  1. #41
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,010

    Thumbs Up Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Thank you for that input Green gardener, and welcome
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Launceston, Cornwall, UK
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Follow up to my previous post, unfortunately no one in our group has taken up the S's. I think the main reason being that we were required to order by mid March. The problem being at this time we don't know how many colonies will survive the winter, particularly this year since the weather is so bad at the moment it isn't possible to open a hive. One of my problems is that I only have 3 colonies so to buy the minimum quantity of 5000 mites and only need 3000 would make for an expensive trial. I think maybe if we are able to have discussions and more info another year a few of us might get involved with this treatment.
    G g.
    Last edited by Green gardener; 03-24-2013 at 03:43 AM.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lexington, VA, USA
    Posts
    57

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    More info from Brian Spencer at Applied-Bionomics re Canadian trial:
    Re: Ss
    Hi Bill
    We have known that they work for about 15 years now. I have just never been able to get a University to go with it.
    About 10 years ago, I thought I had U of Alabama going ahead, but they dropped the project just before we started.
    George at SRI picked up the ball 2 years ago, but even he was threatend with a cease and desist order last year from the province of Ontario.
    My gut feeling is 1,000 mites per hive is too low for a normal varroa treatment.
    I think George's trials this year will show that 100 ml of our media is good (2500 mites). Which is 10 hives per $25 bottle.
    George is also trying to line up a small hive beetle trial this year, with Ss
    Brian Spencer
    On 2013-03-23, at 4:09 PM, Bill Abell <abell.bill@gmail.com> wrote:
    Brian,
    Here is a copy of the latest post to the thread on the mites. Apparently it is going well in the UK. Do you have anything to report on the Canadian trials?
    Gmail

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Bourbon, Missouri
    Posts
    187

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I'll buy a bottle to try!
    How do I get it??

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tyrone, Pennsylvania,USA
    Posts
    353

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I was thinking of ordering some of the Stratiolaelaps until I saw the shipping cost. We have some fungus gnats coming out of the soil from the house plants and wanted to see if they would help get rid of them.
    Package was $15.95
    Shipping $42.25
    Total $58.20

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Bourbon, Missouri
    Posts
    187

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    If that will treat 10 hives, that's only $5.82 each. Doesn't sound too bad to me

    DC, where did you find a place to order them?

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Tyrone, Pennsylvania,USA
    Posts
    353

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    The first site will show some of the venders and the second is the one where I got the price from.
    http://www.appliedbio-nomics.com/pro...stratiolaelaps
    http://greenmethods.com/site/product...edatory-mites/

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Brainerd, MN
    Posts
    533

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I hope there are some here who are feeling a bit experimental and report back. If I even get some individual reports here about it's efficacy I would be down for next year. Just make sure to take mite counts. Will add a lot of credibility if you do sugar roll mite counts.
    Not Michael Bush. My name is Dan. Sorry for the confusion.

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Bergen, Norway
    Posts
    248

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Sounds interesting.

    But more research clearly has to be done. Firstly I would like to know what happens if you simply put some of these mites in a container with some Varroas.

    The second test would be a check of viruses etc they may bring.

    Then they should be observed at comb with eggs, that have been taken out of a hive. (no bees around) Same with young larvae.

    Thirdly a test where one observes them in the hive. How are the bees acting towards them?

    They might eat eggs and small larvae - that might or might not be a problem. But a large population might look for any foodsource, even if the mites would normally considder the prey as to big.

    Lastly - I assume that these mites can be breed in a jar, small fishtank or thelike. Possibly with two cultures, where some of the mites they are normally hunting is kept on plant debris, ant then are fed to the Stratiolaelaps.

    BTW- Reminds me that the mites they prey on also have to be checked out if they are kept together.
    I am a fresh beekeeper.
    -Keep that in mind if you think of following anything I say.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Bolton, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    268

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Came across this thread and was wondering if anyone has tried this yet or if there is any new news on the subject?

    Glen
    You Tube bee Channel Zone 5A
    http://www.youtube.com/user/GlenGH

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Launceston, Cornwall, UK
    Posts
    4

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glen H View Post
    Came across this thread and was wondering if anyone has tried this yet or if there is any new news on the subject?

    Glen
    I think this has been tried in US, probably find thread about that somewhere on this forum.
    I am in UK. The Buckfast Abbey beekeeper in Devon is using these mites in a trial which I think is in its second season. As far as I know it is showing good results.
    I do not have any contact details to hand but you may be able to get info via "The Bee Vet", based, I think, in Exeter UK. Sorry I cannot be more specific at the moment, will be away from home for a few days. Will get more details on return and post then.
    Green gardener

  12. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    carney, maryland, USA
    Posts
    534

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Just wondering, is this an organism that we humans routinely take in like many other organism? Any known effect on humans? Does it make us better beeks?

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Posts
    735

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Seems like it would be big news which would spread like wild fire through the beekeeping community if stratiolaelaps was effective against varroa mites with little or no negative side affects.
    --shinbone
    (3rd year, 14 hives, Zone 5b, 5400 ft, 15.8" annual rainfall)

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,074

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I would think anyone should be able to breed these mites if they know how.

    Maybe possible to breed them inside the hive. Maybe we all turn our SBB in to moss bottom boards

    I wonder if they already live in the bottom of hallowed decaying trees?

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Southern half, UK
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glen H View Post
    Came across this thread and was wondering if anyone has tried this yet or if there is any new news on the subject?
    There's another thread with a link to the Bee Vet here in Devon. http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...626#post948626

    The website, with information and safety pdfs is http://www.bee-vet.co.uk/shop/view/i...-sachet-500-23

    I haven't tried them and don't know anybody who has, but had an update the other day. I don't think there's any harm in sharing it.
    Predator Mites

    Dear Beekeepers,

    The final batch of predatory mites to control Varroa will be in stock at Bee Vet in the week commencing September 30th. If you would like to treat your colonies for a final time this season to maintain a predator population right into winter then please order the number of sachets you require online at www.bee-vet.co.uk in the varroa control section of the shop before Tuesday 1st October. Two per colony is the recommended dose.

    Can I say a big thank you to all those beekeepers who have tried out this novel treatment method and particular thanks to those who have provided feedback. Both the anecdotal feedback and the trial results have again been positive in supporting this approach as an effective way to maintain stable, low Varroa levels.

    My advice about using the final batch now depends on your current Varroa burden. If you know or suspect that Varroa levels have risen in your colonies then I advise that chemical treatment is used instead even though this would kill off any remaining predators. Please contact me if you need advice on this. There are options still available even though the temperature is cooling. I would hope that the mites would be effective into winter but if a long mild autumn allows brood levels to stay high and Varroa climbs very late then a mid-winter oxalic treatment is still an option. You may prefer to carry out an oxalic treatment regardless of levels anyway if this is your usual treatment of choice. You can then repopulate with predatory mites early next season.

    For those who used predatory mites early in the season and did not receive clear instructions in time for re-ordering please accept my sincere apologies. We may have mistakenly given the impression that you were automatically enrolled for the whole season. If you have not yet used chemical treatment methods this season and the varroa levels remain low then you are very welcome to add in the final batch. Otherwise I hope we can promise clearer and simpler ordering for next season. Your feedback from a single or double dose only would also be much appreciated.

    For anyone who is interested in the predatory mites but has not yet applied them to their colonies this season then my advice is to hang on until next year. Biological control is usually most effective when it goes in before a problem really builds. It safer to treat by conventional methods this year and if you need advice on this then please get in touch.

    Hereís hoping that your girls all get put to bed in good order for the winter and that conditions are kinder than last year. I will be especially interested to know the fate and strength of predator treated colonies next spring.

    Please visit the Bee Vet Website for advice, products and access to our forum.

    http://www.bee-vet.co.uk/

    Best Wishes

    Emily Simcock MRCVS

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Danielson, Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Quote Originally Posted by Glen H View Post
    Came across this thread and was wondering if anyone has tried this yet or if there is any new news on the subject?

    Glen
    I tried them this past season with mixed results. George Scott of SRI in Canada has worked with them and seems to have had good results.( Heís mentioned above.) As with all biocontrol organisms timing and release density is the key to success and that may have been some of the issues with the trial I did. I treated 20 colonies in June placing the Stratiolaelaps or Ss on pieces of newspaper, 200ml, under the inn cover. Did an alcohol wash to establish the varroa populations in each hive before. The newspaper was used to keep the carrier and Ss from falling down through the SBB. Looking back at the weather records and we were in a heat wave at the time with 90+ temperatures. In the top of the hive the heat could of very well killed them. They are a soil mite so I would suspect they donít tolerate extremely high temperatures. After 6 weeks most of the hives had increased in varroa levels. I re-inoculated the hives in late July, this time sprinkling the Ss carrier onto the top bars and allowing it to sift down on the bees as George Scott had recommended. Sampling the hives 4 to 5 weeks late show no change in the growth of the varroa. If they were 5% in July they were 5% in August for the most part. 2 hives in the treatment group had under 2% varroa levels from the first treatment and it has stayed low. They were both dinks coming out of winter, had carried a high varroa load the previous season, 10% in August and at June treatment time were the smallest in the group. They also had the same queens from the year before. Did the Ss have an effect? Could of or not. Was the stabilizing of the varroa populations due to the Ss in the other colonies. Maybe but most of the bee stock is from treatment free sources or VSH lines so that probably had an influence on the mite populations. Iíll give it another try next

    Byron

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Bolton, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    268

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Thanks Byron for your input.
    Hopefully others that have tried it will comment too.


    Glen
    You Tube bee Channel Zone 5A
    http://www.youtube.com/user/GlenGH

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Southern half, UK
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    I'm interested in trying Stratiolaelaps next year, but I have open mesh floors so a lot will fall straight through onto the ground so I'm tempted to switch a couple of colonies to solid floors.

    I've been searching unsuccessfully for a study of the success, or otherwise, of Stratiolaelaps on both types of floor.

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Victoria, BC
    Posts
    14

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Hi there,
    I'm Brian Spencer's son, Adam Spencer. I'd be happy to answer any questions regarding the Ss vs Varroa.
    adamabl@telus.net
    or
    spencer_adam@hotmail.com

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Denver, Colorado, U.S.A.
    Posts
    735

    Default Re: Stratiolaelaps - A bug to Fight Varroa?

    Brian - Do they work? What percentage of mite reduction is typical after one application of Stratiolelaps?
    --shinbone
    (3rd year, 14 hives, Zone 5b, 5400 ft, 15.8" annual rainfall)

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