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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Fairfield County, Connecticut, USA
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    Default Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    I have a purchased, and one homemade queen castle. Their weight has me thinking that rigid insulation could be used to advantage. I would still use individual wooden inner cover pieces (possibly thinner than 3/4" boards) with Masonite or luan dividers. I picture the "box" and outer cover being made from the insulation.

    A slatted, wooden bottom would improve the durability of the assembly, if it can be attached securely.

    I would consider building a modified version of the "Coates Nucs" as well...

    Does anyone have experience constructing assemblies with rigid insulation?

    What is the most effective adhesive to use?
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lititz, PA, USA
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    708

    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    Assuming you're talking about EPS, I'd try this stuff.
    http://www.demandproducts.com/item.p...&sku=GROUPFLAS

    but I bet the polyurethane gorilla glue (the brown stuff) would probably work pretty well too, more available and probably cheaper. Need to remember to moisten the pieces just a little with that though.

    I think using plastic push-in rivets along those edges to physically fasten the pieces together while the glue dries would also add some rigidity post cure. Something along these lines:

    http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/Pus...MC6?Pid=search

    Neat idea. Sure would be a heck of a lot lighter.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Utica, NY
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    When I was building airplanes with foam and cardboard I used poly urethane glue. Titebond II also works but the urethane fills in the gaps. Keep in mind that the high strength of urethane is based on not foaming as in clamping tight fitting wood pieces together.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    Lititz, PA, USA
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    708

    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    Acebird,

    So the less it foams the stronger it is? Meaning clamp it tight until it's cured?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    yes.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  6. #6
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    Lititz, PA, USA
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    Ok. Thanks. Good to know.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    I ran across a test of different products on YouTube. Apparently Glidden Gripper primer does a very good job.

    I Iike the idea of the plastic rivets, but not the price.

    The Glidden Gripper (with pressure) seems like it could be an effective and economic choice.
    Last edited by BeeCurious; 02-20-2013 at 08:28 PM. Reason: Typo
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    St. Joseph County, Michigan, USA
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    41

    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    Thanks for the link. That looks pretty sturdy.

    I would have the sides butt into the end pieces. The glue and fasteners wouldn't need to support all the weight at the front...

    With 2" foam l believe l would use 4" screws.
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  10. #10

    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    I thought bees chewed this type of foam.
    David

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Tucson, Arizona, USA
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    5,300

    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    I use foamboard that is foil lined (the bees seem to leave the aluminum alone), more than an inch thick (more intrinsic strength), and assemble the components using hot melt glue.
    48 years - 50 hives - TF
    Joseph Clemens -- Website Under Constructioni

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hudson, WI USA
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    The bees do chew on the foamular 250 from Home depot/Menards, I was thinking that the best way to deal with it if making a box from the stuff (I just use it for lids at the moment over an FBIC) would be to make a complete lining out of plywood. Using the foil backed stuff seems like a good idea and a lot less fussy.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Roy, Wa
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    Those plans look good, but a question. Why do an insulated queen castle, unless you also plan to overwinter a small colony in it? You really can't do any queen rearing until the drones are out and the weather is warm anyway. Here is what I built this year using standard wooden nuc box's and equipment. I just modifyed it a little to suit my needs and to make it a double mini mating nuc/fence hanging set up. Easy on my back and away from ants and pests. I look forward to using them. (I used a single set up last year) I have posted these pics already, but perhaps some have not seen them. I like the top with hindges, but a standard nuc top works fine too. I use machine screws and a large washer inside to hold the weight. The brackets are plenty heavy enough.
    This one is hanging inside just for storage until spring arrives, but a person could easily make entrance tubes to the outside and keep it inside too during use, just for fun









    I can post more photos of details of this box if needed. Seperate entrances, thin inner covers with screened ventilation/feeding holes, attached bottom board. All standard nuc box parts except for just a few things. A good way to use up some scraps of plywood and cedar planks I had around here.

    Here is how you feed them. If I remember right, a quart of syrup will fill the top half of one mini frame-both sides. Make your feeder hole smaller than the lid for a tighter seal.

    Last edited by Lauri; 02-24-2013 at 09:07 AM.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauri View Post
    Why do an insulated queen castle, unless you also plan to overwinter a small colony in it?
    Weight.
    BeeCurious
    Trying to think inside the box...

  15. #15
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    Roy, Wa
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    Ahh...I see.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Rigid insulation as material for "Queen Castle"?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lauri View Post
    Ahh...I see.
    As he pick up the hammer and saw. :-)
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

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