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  1. #1
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    Default Possible Mite Control?

    Has anyone got any information on this? Some Canadian beekeepers are claiming varroa mite control using it.

    http://www.appliedbio-nomics.com/pro...stratiolaelaps

  2. #2
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    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Fascinating
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    News to me. Seems like there was some other type of biological control a number of years ago that apparently never panned out but I am struggling to remember the specifics. I would guess one of the issues is that bees just don't tolerate intruders of any kind in the hive.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  4. #4
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    Southern Oregon
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    The biocontrol agent from a few years ago was a fungus... Metarhizium anisopliae. I have wondered about predatory mites before as they can be effective in horticultural settings. The question is would Stratiolaelaps live and reproduce in a hive? It is a very specific environment to be adapted to and does not appear to fit into its natural life cycle. I could be wrong and maybe they are very adaptable.

    What are the sources of these reports from beekeepers?
    Last edited by JBJ; 02-20-2013 at 07:19 AM. Reason: puctuation
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  5. #5
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    Flora,IL
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Any idea what the application protocol would be???

  6. #6
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    Oct 2011
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    Clark county, Illinois, USA
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    220

    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Quote Originally Posted by gmcharlie View Post
    Any idea what the application protocol would be???
    Just a WAG on my part. I don't think they would stay in the hive so if broodless then dump them in and done, if not broodless would prob need to dump them in every week for 3 weeks. Again just a wild ***** guess.

  7. #7
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    If it does help, we would have killed them off years ago with the acaracides... there were 30 some mites that used to live in harmony on bees before we started treating for Varroa.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
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    Southern Oregon
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    If it does help, we would have killed them off years ago with the acaracides... there were 30 some mites that used to live in harmony on bees before we started treating for Varroa.
    The same is true in horticulture, however there are IPM strategies that specifically plan for care and consideration of the beneficials such as species specific treatments and host plant nurseries to name a few. If these things did work affordably for Varroa clean comb would be necessity. Study of the the culture of predatory mites is part of how I stumbled into bees.

    Who are these Canadians making these claims? Anything published?
    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    If it does help, we would have killed them off years ago with the acaracides... there were 30 some mites that used to live in harmony on bees before we started treating for Varroa.
    ...or one could conclude if they had helped we wouldnt have needed miticides. 30 mites living in harmony on bees? Hmmmm. Dare I ask for more information on this claim that they once existed and no longer do?
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    John B Jacob www.oldsolbees.com

  11. #11
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    Jun 2008
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    Sacramento,California,USA
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    The article Linked to by Michael Palmer states these are a soil predatory mite. Perhaps releasing them into the soil around the hives would help reduce mites instead of putting them inside the hive? Since they are soil predatory mites, maybe they would work for control of small hive beetles?
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Volga, SD
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    2,790

    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Do these mites eat early instar bee larvae? The photo in the link from the initial post shows a mite preying on a beetle larva. The description suggests that these mites are general predators and will kill and eat anything small enough for them to subdue.

    If it works, it sounds like a good option to get inflict some predation on a pest that seems to be lacking a predator or parasite in this country.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Lexington, VA, USA
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    57

    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    I emailed the "breeder" Applied Bio-Enomics and asked for info. His reply to me

    "Yes, Stratiolaelaps works very well.
    There is ongoing research in Niagara and a new trial scheduled in Pennsylvania"

    Brian Spencer

    I emailed him back asking for more details and contact info at the 2 sites mentioned. I will pass along any further info he provides.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
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    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    >Dare I ask for more information on this claim that they once existed and no longer do?

    I guess you did.

    I got it from Nancy Ostiguy in a presentation to Kansas Honey Producers in their March meeting in 2006 and I'm sure she said the name of the study where she got the number, but I wasn't quick enough to write it down. I can give you a few of them:

    Acarapis dorsalis
    Acarapis vagans
    Acarapis externus
    Tarsonemus apis
    Sennertia shimanukii
    Sennertia faini
    Aceria litchii

    She said that was in the hive. I'm pretty sure that is not necessarily on the bees, so I'm sure some live in the debris, some on the combs, some in the pollen, and some on the bees. She said 33 different mites.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  15. #15
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    Sennertia shimanukii
    If you look at this page, you'll notice a link to a map next to "Distribution." They may have lived on the bees, but it's clear that not all 30 of them lived on bees in the same place. 30 different mites that lived on bees across the world.

    http://insects.ummz.lsa.umich.edu/be...shimanukii.htm
    Regards, Barry

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Actually here is a study that says:
    "Abstract: A list of mites newly found in nests of Apis mellifera. Till the present, the acarine fauna of A. mellifera includes over 170 species."

    http://www.landesmuseum.at/biophp/ar...5&artinr=13954

    So there used to 170 species logged and they have now found more...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 1999
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    DuPage County, Illinois USA
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    To clarify, you're saying that worldwide, there have been some number (170) of different mites found in nests of Apis mellifera, not that there are that many different ones found in a hive at once?
    Regards, Barry

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    I'm not saying it. I'm just quoting an abstract, but that is probably a correct statement that that is what has been cataloged. Probably before acracides, around 30 was a more likely number.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  19. #19
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    Apr 2010
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    Lexington, VA, USA
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    57

    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Here is the email reply from Brian at bio nomics:
    "I need to know who is asking first.

    I reason I am asking is that we have found considerable roadblocks doing this research. The research in Canada has been largely secret because of this. Once I know who you are, I will pass your contact info on to the researcher, who will then decide whether or not to contact you.

    It is hoped that the Pennsylvania research will be out in the open, but nothing has happened yet."



    Brian



    From: Bill Abell [mailto:abell.bill@gmail.com]
    Sent: February-20-13 10:46 AM
    To: Brian
    Subject: Re: [Applied Bio-nomics contact] Varroa Mites



    Thank you. Can you give me any details on either or both. If possible a contact person name, phone and address. Much obliged.
    Bill Abell

    On Wed, Feb 20, 2013 at 1:18 PM, Brian <brianabl@telus.net> wrote:

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Default Re: Possible Mite Control?

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Bush View Post
    I'm not saying it. I'm just quoting an abstract, but that is probably a correct statement that that is what has been cataloged. Probably before acracides, around 30 was a more likely number.
    I can accept that. What do we know, though, about the survival of these mites in the post varroa time frame. Are there more or less, were they susceptible to miticides or did they develop the same resistance varroa did. Arent we just assuming that these mites lived in harmony simply because they were in the hives? Perhaps some were detrimental. Lots and lots of variables wouldnt you agree?
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

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