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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Grey County, ON, Canada
    Posts
    101

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    What if you built a 'funnel' out of aluminum? I'm thinking a piece of flat stock slightly narrower than your entrance and long enough to reach almost to the back. Then just pour dry sugar on it. Just a thought

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,246

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Ideally dry sugar is placed just above and as near to the cluster as possible. Bees may take dry sugar on a bottom board well if the cluster is very low but there are also scenarios, oddly enough, where bees will begin to haul it out of the entrance like so much garbage.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,614

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    A local beek here told me to close off the lower entrance up to 90% to help alleviate them kicking out the sugar as trash. He told me they will finally get it and eat it.

    I personally have never done this as I bring all my bees south for the winter. I suppose if I was inclined to keep them in NY I might consider putting my previous summer NUCs in an insulated building with fans.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Grey County, ON, Canada
    Posts
    101

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Certainly it would be better if you could get the lid off but since that isn't an option I guess you could try sugar on the bottom boards for a few and do more if it works? I've tried boardman feeders before and they're a ton of work... You'll probably pay more than 50 cents for a mason jar to put in that feeder plus no matter how careful you are the Jars will eventually turn green with mold which can't be good for the bees. Best of luck whatever way you go with

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Fruitland ,Idaho
    Posts
    419

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    [QUOTE=Allen Martens;896828]Nick, interesting your experience is 40 F as to when difficulties arise in the wintering shed. I very comfortable with temperature up to about 50 F and not too concerned if temperatures reach mid 50's F in spring for a couple of hours. If I want to work in the wintering shed, I normally drop the temperature down to 35 F or so.

    We try and hold our shed at 40 F. The problem is when the lights are on they want to leave the box. I don't want them out of the box until we haul them to California. I don't sweep or turn the main red lights on at all once they are in. I check the temp. every day and make sure the fans are working and leave them alone. This past winter was the easiest we have had it for controlling temps as it was colder outside.
    We are only in storage for about 60 days, so its not really the same program you guys have up north. How many pounds do you figure a good hive (8-10 frames bees) loses over a normal winter? Also do see much bee population losses?

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Ya the trick to wintering indoors is having consistent COLD weather outside to help regulate the indoor temp. Rairly would there be a chance for hives to fly throughout the entire winter period, if they sat outside, maybe once or twice throughout the entire wintering period. We have a consistent cold winter here in Manitoba,
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Hard to tell what the bee loss would be over the winter, Ill sweep up 5-6 barrels of bees from 1000 single hives through the winter. So I guess the bee loss would be something like 1/2 - 1 1/2 lbs of bees per hives.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    bridgewater , nova scotia
    Posts
    666

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    I always wondered how beekeepers saw what they were doing inside the buildings where they kept the bees .

    If the bees are bothered by the red lights , if you could find night vision binoculars or a monoculars , that would be a neat way to avoid the lights ?? i don't know if that is stupid or not to suggest : )

    I know i'm a little nutty : p

    Ben

    You have a nice setup Ian !

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    I can work in the shed with red lighting and very will see very little disturbance from the hives.
    I made the mistake a while ago of wearing a head lamp, with white light. Not to long before I had a FACE FULL OF BEES !
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    bridgewater , nova scotia
    Posts
    666

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    I'm sure that was a fun experience .

  11. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Shoshone County, Idaho
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Ian I made the mistake of wearing a headlamp under my veil when moving bees at night by hand once. ...and I say ONCE!
    Did not have anyway to shut headlamp off as switch is on headlamp and I did not want to lift up my veil with 80,000 bees bouncing off and clinging to it trying to sting me anyway they could. That was the most stings I ever received and it was not fun! But funny now when I think back at my learning curve!
    Hugus Creek Honey Farm: St. Maries, ID / Lewiston, ID
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  12. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    ha ha ha, learning curve is right ! lol
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  13. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    420

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Nick as far as bee loss per hive, Ian's number of 1/2 to 1 1/2 pounds per hive is probably a good one. This number can vary greatly from year to year. Hives that have lost most of their summer bees during the fall before move in will drop fewer bees in winter. Most times a heavier drop points to stronger hives and better survival because this usually means the hives are bigger to begin with. (Of course if disease is not under control, then the hives may just be dying.) No bee drop is a really bad thing.

    I used to use a headlamp that had a red light option but lost it during a bee move last year. So, this year I have only been using a white light headlamp and have gotten away with it so far. However, as I said before, I do drop the temp down to just above freezing if I am going to work in the wintering room.

  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    took a peak into the nucs the other day, they seem to be holding a larger cluster than I thought when I brought them in.

    Five weeks ! The time will fly!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  15. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Jamestown, North Dakota, USA
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Ian,

    Do you see any difference in winter survival of the singles versus the doubles? Seems like I always have up to 40 or so hives I can't seem to fit on the semi headed to almonds and I always have a mixture of singles and doubles to choose from. My building is a bit larger and I'd have fewer bees to help heat it so I'd have to supplement the heat a bit to keep it at 5 degrees C or so. Also interested in the genetics of the bees you have the best luck with for wintering indoors--that would factor into who stays and who goes to CA in the fall.

  16. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    ya, indoor wintering will work for you, we are basically neighbours ! Cheers!

    As for the question about singles and doubles, I see a bit of a larger population from the doubles, but as for wintering losses, I see no difference. I have both double and single arrangement as well as 5 frame nucs. I use alot of Cali queens, carni, they work great !
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  17. #57
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Jamestown, North Dakota, USA
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Thanks Ian; I'll give this a try next fall!

  18. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    sure beats wrapping
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  19. #59
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Jamestown, North Dakota, USA
    Posts
    128

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    sure beats wrapping
    Absolutely! Wrapping is what got me sending bees to almonds a long time ago when there was little economic return.

  20. #60
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    5,787

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    ha ha ha, probably would of sent me to Cali also ! , hmmmm
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

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