Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 64
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Feeding Indoor Hives

    For you beekeepers who keep bees inside, what do you use to feed your nucs this time of year.
    I am thinking my nucs went in light this year. I hefted a few that were on top of the stack, and they seem light to me. Im thinking of feeding them starting March.
    I have seen those white entrance feeders to screw a bottle on to, but they are charging 50 cent for them!

    Ideas ?
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,995

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    I don't keep bees inside during the winter. I am however curious about keeping bees inside over the winter.

    How large a building?
    How warm are you keeping it?
    How many NUCs do you have inside?
    Do you keep it completely dark?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,901

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Any kind of entrance feeder isn't going to work unless the temperature is over 50 degrees. If you are keeping bees indoors I'm sure your temperature is way below that, at least it should be. John

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    We keep the shed at 5 degrees C. We can see the cluster from the entrance.

    BMAC, I keep my hives in a 30*40 insulated Quonset shed. This year I packed 1050 hive inside which includes 200 of my nucs. Its tight!
    The secret is to keep the shed dark and keep the air moving inside. I have thermostats which relay to exhausting fans to help keep my temperatures down.

    If your interested , I took a quick video a couple of months back,
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=5a0_JjRSOnU
    I have the shed rigged up with red lights so I can work inside without having the shed come alive !
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,995

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    great video. Thanks. Do you ever have to worry about too much co2 in the hut or does the fans do a fine job when regulating the temps?

    Also do you ever have to warm them or does that many bees packed in there so well take care of that for you?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    I have my ventilation fan set on a minimum to take care of the moisture and CO2 concerns.
    We had a month of -30 lately, and during that time my fans were at the minimum, but the hives kept the shed above 0 degrees C at all times. During the day, the temp held at 4 degrees without any supplemental heating.

    Indoor wintering has its problems, but I will tell you, it felt good knowing my hives were sitting inside a nice warm shed as the wind howled for weeks riding a -45 degree windchill !
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,995

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    What is problematic about wintering indoors?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ft. Collins, Colorado
    Posts
    603

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    So Ian, are they locked up in the shed for a full 3-4-5 months in the shed?? Any issues with nosema??

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    2,776

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Cool video!
    Horseshoe Point Honey -- http://localvahoney.com/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Quote Originally Posted by BMAC View Post
    What is problematic about wintering indoors?
    As spring nears they get a bit restless, it get busy here moving hives out as the nice weather falls on us. I will work 2 or 3 nights straight moving hives into spring yards
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Quote Originally Posted by Brandy View Post
    So Ian, are they locked up in the shed for a full 3-4-5 months in the shed?? Any issues with nosema??
    Yes, from November 1st to April 1st , typically

    Nosema is a concern but its managed according to the severity.
    Mites are more of a concern. It seems the bees dont winter well with viral loads of any kind. But that goes with outdoor wintering aswell
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Montgomery County, NY
    Posts
    1,995

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Ian sorry for high jacking your thread here, but it is very educational.

    How thick of insulation do you use?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Shoshone County, Idaho
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Ian I feed my nucs either fondant or similar type of sugar/food patties in the winter. Stay away from syrup now it = danger in the winter/early spring before it starts to warm up.

    What do you use to control the nosema?

    I have been trying different essential oils and some thymol in my patties but just have started so I don't know the results yet. Seems like I get hammered with nosema/dysentery type conditions later in the winter b/c we have such a wet damp rainy/snowy winter with variable temps all over the place= Lots of moisture!
    Hugus Creek Honey Farm: St. Maries, ID / Lewiston, ID
    Like us on Facebook

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Manitoba, Canada
    Posts
    473

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    A lot of guys used to feed during winter with entrance feeders (boardmans) and jar after the border closed and they had to start wintering bees. If I recall correctly, they raised the wintering room temperature to about 7C.

    A couple of years ago some of the beekeepers around here were a bit light around this time of the year as well. So of their bees were staved at that point. They used plastic 1 litre honey containers, punched several holes into one side near the top rim, filled the container with 2:1 syrup, put on the lid and flipped the container upside down and placed it on the entrance lid with the holes facing the entrance. The container was supported on so type of wire support. I'll try to get some more information about the wire support for you if you would like - may take several days.

    Saved the bees nicely. They thought the bees came out of winter having more brood that normal and the hives actually had a head start.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Thanks Allen, that sounds like it will work. I dont want to spend alot of money on making or buying feeders. Never thought of that idea!
    any or more information on it would be usefull

    Cheers!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Mtn. Bee, you have to realize the hives are stacked 5 pallets high. My only access to the bee cluster is through the entrance.

    The idea that winter feeding is harmful is very exaggerated. The main concern is increased moisture perspiration within the hive, causing condensation. If the hive has the ability to expel that moisture, they should be fine.
    Within the wintering shed I can manage moisture expulsion very well during the winter months.

    I monitor my hives closely for nosema, and when I find levels that reach our threshold levels, I will use Fumagillin .

    ya, it seems that nosema is associated with foul weather.
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Quote Originally Posted by BMAC View Post
    Ian sorry for high jacking your thread here, but it is very educational.

    How thick of insulation do you use?
    Hey BMAC, I love high jacked threads, its were you get the good stuff !

    My shed walls are 4 inches full of fiberglass insulation . Not much, but enough to keep the shed from chilling
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH COLUMBIA
    Posts
    1,349

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Ian, were you crying for 50 cents per nuc? I mean, come on. One nuc in your area will produce 150 pounds and 200 is not really unrealistic. At $1.85 or so today, one hive can pay for all those feeders. My point being I think you can afford them. More importantly you cannot afford to loose the nucs. I have heard of guys feeding in sheds at this time of the year. They turn the heat up a bit and fill the frame feeders. They bring the stacks of bees from one part of the building unstack and feed, restack and move on to the next stack. In my experience feeding in cool and damp weather is so risky. It takes the bees a lot of energy and life force to process the syrup and cure it to the right moisture content. The only way I think it works over on the Prairies is the vey low relative humidity of the air. That low moisture probably helps the bees evaporate the moisture without taking all their vitality. Around here the air is very damp making it very difficult for the bees to lower moisture. It is a very good way to damage your hives here.

    That being said if it were my bees and if I had 400 frames of honey I would shake the bees of some combs and give them 2 frames of honey each.
    You could also get one of those racket making machines that recirculate the syrup and have a manifold that sprays the syrup in the comb. You could do that first then give 2 frames of freshly sprayed syrup per nuc. Either way good luck.

    Jean-Marc
    Last edited by jean-marc; 02-15-2013 at 03:46 PM. Reason: spelling

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Manitoba Canada
    Posts
    6,606

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    no no Jean-Marc, I dont have the luxury of re stacking. Not enough space.
    with all due respect Jean-Marc, its my business to cry over 50 cents, not yours. Just looking for other methods and ideas
    appreciate your feedback though,
    cheers!
    Ian Steppler >> Canadian Beekeeper's Blog
    www.stepplerfarms.com

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Shoshone County, Idaho
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: Feeding Indoor Hives

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian View Post
    Mtn. Bee, you have to realize the hives are stacked 5 pallets high. My only access to the bee cluster is through the entrance.
    I was thinking about my top entrances that I use on my migratory covers which have a rim with a cut out (exactly like a bottom entrance on a 4-way pallet but on the top cover instead). All I have to do is walk from pallet to pallet and slide patties thru the top entrances and they sit on top of the frames right next to the cluster even with my pallets stacked up. The bottom of my 4-way pallets have a rim that goes completely around so they are shut tight, but I do drill a 1-1/4" screened over hole thru the plywood for drainage and air flow.
    I guess I am just a backwards beekeeper!
    Good Luck with those nucs hope 100% make it thru for you! Mtn Bee
    Hugus Creek Honey Farm: St. Maries, ID / Lewiston, ID
    Like us on Facebook

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads