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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Council Bluffs, IA
    Posts
    127

    Default Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    Is there any way to do this?

    Its plastic foundation, fully drawn. Can I save the comb? Or if not, how do I re-use the foundation? Scrape the wax off, melt it, and redip them in melted beeswax?

    Thanks!
    Chad

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gaston, SC
    Posts
    271

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    without a pic hard to tell

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    901

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    If it's not just COVERED in webbing and wax moth stuff, then the bees in a really strong hive will clean it up, repair, and reuse. If it's covered, then yes scrap it of with like a stiff plastic spatula and depending on the condition of the wax surface of the foundation, use as is, or paint or dip or whatever some more wax on there.

    Rod

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Stockton, CA
    Posts
    309

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    Don't forget to look in the grooves where the plastic foundation slips into the top and bottom grooves for wax moth larva. I had a bait hive sit all winter and it got really infested with small and large wax moths. I scraped off the plastic foundation and thought I got them all until I popped out the foundation out of curiosity. Man was it packed. Head to tail all the way from end board to end board.


    Has anyone tried steaming the wax off the plastic foundation using a wallpaper steam remover? I saw a video on doing it to old wax comb.


    Like this guy is doing.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbx-Dv5iLmA
    Last edited by beesohappy; 02-09-2013 at 06:39 PM. Reason: I added a video link

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    218

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    Depending on the amount of webbing (see above about that) scrape etc. As for larva in the grooves freeze it for a couple of days and they will die as will any eggs. Then treat as new plastic foundation.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Council Bluffs, IA
    Posts
    127

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    I will try to get some pics on this thread this afternoon after work. Thanks for the responses all.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,553

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    If the wax moths really take it over and get done, you just shake off the webs and put it back in the hive. If they half webbed it up, then I would scrap it down to the plastic. If there is only an occasional web, I might just leave it and put it in a strong hive to clean it up.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Charles City, VA
    Posts
    76

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    Im currently in Al for a class and attended a local meeting and heard an interesting way of getting rid of empty wax comb with wax moths. The speaker said to take a bee box with the frames and cram it down on a red ant hill. He said they will clean all the comb from any wax moth larvea and a night will crawl back into there hill for you to retrieve.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Sacramento,California,USA
    Posts
    3,838

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    [QUOTE=beesohappy;894582]Has anyone tried steaming the wax off the plastic foundation using a wallpaper steam remover? I saw a video on doing it to old wax comb.


    Like this guy is doing.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbx-Dv5iLmA



    Yes, I set up a wallpaper steamer very similar to the youtube video, it works great. The only problem is, if you use plastic foundation or frames, it will warp them badly enough to call them destroyed and you'll have to toss them in the trash can. I scraped the frames and put the old pupa casing wax into a 5 gallon paint strainer bag. I packed it in very tightly too. I then put the bag in the beebox and attached the steamer hose and let her steam. It worked very well, I got much more wax than I thought I would from my past efforts at melting down old brood comb. Oh, I had the beebox of wax sitting on top of a stack of a couple boxes and it was tilted so it drained the wax into a 5 gallon bucket.
    “When one tugs at a single thing in nature, he finds it attached to the rest of the world.” – John Muir

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Council Bluffs, IA
    Posts
    127

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    So, HOPEFULLY.... here are some pics of the worst frame of webbing I had. I don't know if these will show up.... Fingers crossed!!!




    photobee.JPGphotobee2.JPG

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Council Bluffs, IA
    Posts
    127

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    So based on these pics of the worst frame.... Are they salvageable?

    Thanks!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lee County, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    70

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    Quote Originally Posted by Widdy View Post
    The speaker said to take a bee box with the frames and cram it down on a red ant hill. He said they will clean all the comb from any wax moth larvea and a night will crawl back into there hill for you to retrieve.
    I really like this idea. Wish I had thought of it when I had this problem one year. May as well put the fire ants to work.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cookeville, TN, USA
    Posts
    4,140

    Default Re: Salvaging foundation with some wax moth webbing

    I caught a big swarm last year and didn't have very much equipment that was not in use so I gave them some comb that I had already culled to get rid of - much worse than in your pictures - and they fixed it up like new by the first time I inspected them. Your mileage may vary.
    Since '09-25H-T-Z6b

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