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  1. #21
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    May 2009
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    Flora,IL
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon Parker View Post
    Heat load from the bees?
    Yes, the bees are going to add quite a bit of heat. That was the part I have not figured out how to calculate. I wondered about useing calories but not that good at the math....

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
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    Denver, Colorado
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    There aren't going to be any bees in the shop. Walls are to keep bees out while extracting. Air conditioner to make extracting less excruciating.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  3. #23
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    May 2009
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    Flora,IL
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    drat.. I thought you were going to try wintering in it....!

  4. #24
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    Dec 2002
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    Denver, Colorado
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    I live a couple hundred miles further south than you!
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
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    2,646

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    well that won't help me extract my head from...... are your hives raising brood yet???

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    I don't know for sure, but usually by this time.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    45,340

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    If I was going to bury it, I'd probably paint it with tar first and then put styrofoam against the outside walls before backfilling. I would leave the top showing, but if you want to cover it with sod, I wouldn't put more than 6" of dirt on top, as it's not made to hold a lot of weight. If you put thick styrofoam there, you really don't need insulation inside. But if you want to, 2 x 2s would work and then put in whatever suits you for insulation. You can just run all the electrical in EMT. Nothing says it has to be hidden in a wall...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Summerfield, NC
    Posts
    67

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon Parker View Post
    I don't know for sure, but usually by this time.
    I had a small amount of capped brood on Sunday, in a hive that is booming out of the winter. No capped drones yet.

    Also, my previous employer put this on top of his shipping containers that were used for material storage for eight-week electrical construction jobs.

    http://www.lowes.com/pd_47100-256-KS...rchQueryType=1

  9. #29
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    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
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    5,033

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    I don't intend to bury it, the whole idea is to take it with me when I move.

    The simplest would be my brother's idea which was to bolt 2x4's to the wall in the recesses of the corrugation. Then he attached foam board insulation to those and then plywood outside of that. But his idea involves putting a lot of holes in the envelope of the container which I don't like much. Perhaps there's a way to do it without puncturing things.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Weeki Wachee, Florida,USA
    Posts
    1,916

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    I've always had a passing interest in these structures.
    No experience but a couple thoughts.
    Insulating the floor and what you place it on is a factor.
    Is there a flex factor in loading and moving? It seems they can get dropped hard.
    Ceramic paint on the outside seems to be a popular choice.

    Don't forget to ventilate it well!

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    goldsboro nc USA
    Posts
    96

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    You need to weld a bracket of some sort to bolt he walls to. I would use 2x3 studs to save room(every inch will count). I would also spray foam insulate within he walls and not worry bout moisture getting in. If you maintain the outside well enough you shouldn't have any leaks or moisture coming in.

  12. #32
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    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    My shop is already effectively 16x20. All I have to do is split it down the middle and put it end to end and I have a shipping container!

    Outside moisture is of little concern to me. However condensation could be troubling. Though, this won't be like a house, heated all through the winter with loads of opportunity for vapor to travel through permeable materials. I only tend to use it for about 3 hours at a time in the winter and only a couple days throughout the summer. But still, going with the highest quality construction is my preference. I think I could do it with two or three of those $600 spray foam kits. My concern would be getting off ratio. I really don't want it off gassing for the rest of eternity. I store all my bee stuff in there.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
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    45,340

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    >I've always had a passing interest in these structures.

    I lived in them for about three years... I never took one apart, but I don't remember it looking like they drilled and screwed things from the outside. When I did see people working on them, they seem to be using steel and a welder for everything they were doing as far as structure. Steel studs might be the way to go and then screw sheetrock onto them. Insulation can be put between them (whatever kind you like).
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
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    2,646

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    Quote Originally Posted by Solomon Parker View Post
    My shop is already effectively 16x20. All I have to do is split it down the middle and put it end to end and I have a shipping container!

    Outside moisture is of little concern to me. However condensation could be troubling. Though, this won't be like a house, heated all through the winter with loads of opportunity for vapor to travel through permeable materials. I only tend to use it for about 3 hours at a time in the winter and only a couple days throughout the summer. But still, going with the highest quality construction is my preference. I think I could do it with two or three of those $600 spray foam kits. My concern would be getting off ratio. I really don't want it off gassing for the rest of eternity. I store all my bee stuff in there.
    Do not worry about screwing up the ratio. the kits work great! I liked the tiger foam and did 45' X 8' about 4 inches thick with one kit. if you stick studs in the recess and then foam over it, the studs would be "glued" in place and you could finish if you liked, or you can just paint the foam. (not as pretty but works great)

  15. #35
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    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    I dislike the idea of wood touching metal. Wood is a poor insulator and good at rotting. The studs would effectively only be there to hold up the plywood I'll use in place of drywall. I would use drywall, but I want tough stuff I can screw into, attach heavy shelves to, and generally attach things so they won't fall over in transit.

    What is the pressure rating for the blue polystyrene at Lowe's? Can it be used under the floor without causing any problems or do I need to seek out something more beefy?
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    965

    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    Blue board has been used in homebuilt aircraft structure since the late 70's.
    Provided you have a 3/4" subflooring sheet on top to distribute the force of point loads, you shouldn't have any issues with it.

    if you want to trade time for expense on your walls, you might scab 2/2" osb up vertically a few inches form the walls and blow in foam.
    The foam will adhere to the osb and secure it to the wall.

    Chases for electric lines and such are cut with a router after the foam cures and and then filled with scrap and mudded over.
    This is pretty much fabricating a structural insulated panel in place.
    And, you never have t0 search for studs when you screw into the wall.

    If money were plenty and time were not, I'd use construction adhesive to attach SIP 2x4 curtain walls to the walls/ceiling/floor.

    Rolled foam strips or plastic washers can be used to create a standoff if you don't want wood in contact with the metal wall, btw.
    It would also provide a drain space for any condensate. Properly placed weep holes at the bottom of the wall would prevent condensate buildup and corrosion on the floor.

    If you have a budget for it and want experienced construction help on site, PM me.

  17. #37
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    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    given the cost of the orginal contanir, I hear 1000? and adding insulation, would it be better to find a couple of prebuilt sheds? they would have studs... I keep my stuff in a cpl of 10 by 12 prebuilts on skids......

  18. #38
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    Dec 2002
    Location
    Denver, Colorado
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    Default Re: How to Insulate a Shipping Container

    Sheds aren't as easy to take with you and don't offer much real estate for solar panels. Plus, I'd still have to insulate the shed.
    Solomon Parker, Parker Farms, ParkerFarms.biz
    11 Years Treatment-Free, ~25 Colony Baseline

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