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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    covington ga
    Posts
    173

    Default 2.3 or 4 lb package

    My goal this year is to come out with about 1=
    2 splits and i would like to know what you would order by way of 2. 3 or 4 lb packages.i have been told by several folks<2-3 year newbies> about all 3 so i am a little confused....i have been able to make splits off of 2 lbs as well as 4 lbs...
    I was hoping somebody like sqrk or honey householder who have alot of experience could chime in here....thank you greg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,646

    Default Re: 2.3 or 4 lb package

    given your location, 2s will do fine. I use 3,s but I am much farther north, shorter season, cooler nights.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    barry co., Michigan
    Posts
    302

    Default Re: 2.3 or 4 lb package

    I think the idea is that 4 lbs of bees will able to be able to cover more potential brood rearing space than 2 lbs of bees, so in principle they should be able to build up faster

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Vermontville, Michigan
    Posts
    88

    Default Re: 2.3 or 4 lb package

    FWIW, I used two 4 lb packages last year when I started (and I am by no means "experienced"), but I had one really strong hive going into winter, and I had one that I did not think was going to make it. If it does make it, I think it might be because I started with a 4 lb package. Between two supercedures and a case of SHB, that hive was struggling, and it took a lot of work to get it to build back up. It didn't cost much more to get the 4 lb package, and I'm glad I went with it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Flora,IL
    Posts
    2,646

    Default Re: 2.3 or 4 lb package

    research shows that no matter the size of the hive, roughly the same percentage of bees is out forageing or raiseing brood. if you have drawn comb, a 2lb package in warm climates will take off just fine, you will really not notice the difference between a 2 or a 4 with drawn comb and warm climates. The growth of the hive is dependant on the new queen laying and the stores handy as the first batch grows. about 80% of the packages sold are 3lb packages. mostly going to northern climates, and a good portion to new hives with no comb. if you have no comb or food the larger packages will help as there are more bees to draw foundation, which is the huge limiting factor in new hives. the queen can only lay and food stored when there is a location.

    Personaly I split a lot (around 30 a year) of 3lb packages into nucs with drawn frames and pollen and honey in late March. by May they are ready for full hives. and ususaly create 30lbs of honey extra by fall. thats how I start my new queens..... and of course some queens don't fly.

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