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  1. #21
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
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    4,649

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    >You learn a lot in a very compressed time frame from cutouts.
    He will Quickly learn to have used a smoker.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,092

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    It's illegal to speed too, but all of us are guilty of it.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,070

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    >He will Quickly learn to have used a smoker.
    Or a really good suit and veil!

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    760

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Quote Originally Posted by Lburou View Post
    To this enlightened advice i would add that you should take extra supers along for the bees and comb you can't see yet.
    Found that out.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
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    1,070

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Did you do the cutout?

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
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    760

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    .

    Well,

    I did the cutout. My bee suit worked really well, except I got too hot. I almost finished and had to disrobe. The problem was that I had taped myself up pretty doggone good (no regrets either because bees were all over me.....a smoker wouldn't have helped, believe me). I had multi-layers of pants, shirts, jackets, a batting helmet under veil, etc. THIS IS FLORIDA - NOT RHODE ISLAND. The bees were not playing, I assure you all.

    Anyhow, I underestimated how quickly I would heat up. I was in direct sunlight and trying to cut comb out while laying down. I don't care WHO you are or how experienced you are, it would not have been fun. Of course it would have been nice to have help and more equipment, but what's done is done. It was a great experience although a bit hairy.

    So anyhow, I got most of the comb and then I also was able to place it all in my top bar hive (hairclips and tie-wraps). I left the hive there last night and will pick it up tonight. I MAY have to go back and clean up any remaining bees left under the home in the next few days. I'm hoping that most of the bees have made their way into my hive where the great majority of the comb is and then tonight they will all be inside. I slap some duct tape over the entrance and in the trunk they go. I already secured the roof with plenty of tape yesterday.

    I'll have some videos and photos later.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
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    760

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Quote Originally Posted by odfrank View Post
    >You learn a lot in a very compressed time frame from cutouts.
    He will Quickly learn to have used a smoker.
    Actually, a vacuum.

    That was THE big mistake.

    I went back over there tonight to pick up my hive that I had placed all the cut-out brood and the doggone thing was completely empty of bees. I got the flashlight out and they ALL were still holding-out underneath the home, starting from scratch.

    EPIC FAIL !!

    So now I'm pissed off because all that brood comb I cut out is a complete waste. I'm sure it's all dead by now since there's been no temperature regulation.

    I was completely mistaken about them abandoning all that brood. They stayed with the queen and abandoned the brood. My worst fear.

    SO anyhow, I contacted a local guy I've dealt with before who has a nice bee vac to see if he wants a crap-load of bees and perhaps a queen with no comb - or at least comb that's not worth too much at this point.

    I'm sure he won't be interested.

    Is anyone else?

    If not, I may try to build a cheap vac tomorrow or I may have to go over there and douse them all with soapy water.

    Anyhow, my trap-out I did previously was a complete success, but this was a complete disaster.

    Not in a good mood right now - and to make matters worse, my wife who isn't fully supportive of this endeavor wasn't too happy. That explains why I don't even have a bee vac yet.

    By the way, I've already been paid $60 bucks for this, so financially it's not a loss......but it's a blow to my pride and a blow to those bees.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    San Mateo, CA
    Posts
    4,649

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    > CHARGE a suitable fee for you efforts. Cut out bees only produce a good hive some of the time. I am amazed what newbees are doing for free or peanuts these days.

    I can only repeat what I said in post #19. I did a few easy ones last year with one or two helpers for $300 and we came out with about $40 an hour not including the time it took to set up the bees as a hive. Nor any income to cover our vacuum cost etc. I wouldn't drive over there for $60.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    218

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Spray with water mist to reduce flying, shake/sweep into a box (get all you can) and tip into the hive, they will keep what they can and clean out the rest. Do this around dusk so you get as many of the foragers as you can. With luck you get the queen too. Then in a few weeks re-queen with a gentler tempered queen and you should be good to go.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,092

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Huh..... enough said.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    955

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Pat, with this take out you just paid some of the tuition toward a bee take out course in the school of life. With this one under your belt you can, and will, attack the next one from a different viewpoint. Each time you do it you will take something with you to improve your outcome.

    When you've done ten or twenty takeouts, and with some experimenting, you will surely start with a little smoke, vacuum, and take precautions to leave some comb in case the queen is hiding. If you missed her, the queen will be on that comb when you check back (just vacuum and be gone with her in the box).

    A rudimentary vacuum is easy to improvise. Just take care to control the suction so it does not destroy the bees going through the nozzle and hose. I made one from a tidy cat bucket for a one time use. On that take out, the bees were back in their old location in the morning. The improvised vacuum worked just fine and I started making a robovac soon after.
    Lee Burough
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
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    760

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Quote Originally Posted by Lburou View Post
    Pat, with this take out you just paid some of the tuition toward a bee take out course in the school of life. With this one under your belt you can, and will, attack the next one from a different viewpoint. Each time you do it you will take something with you to improve your outcome.

    When you've done ten or twenty takeouts, and with some experimenting, you will surely start with a little smoke, vacuum, and take precautions to leave some comb in case the queen is hiding. If you missed her, the queen will be on that comb when you check back (just vacuum and be gone with her in the box).

    A rudimentary vacuum is easy to improvise. Just take care to control the suction so it does not destroy the bees going through the nozzle and hose. I made one from a tidy cat bucket for a one time use. On that take out, the bees were back in their old location in the morning. The improvised vacuum worked just fine and I started making a robovac soon after.

    EXCELLENT post with good information - especially about leaving some comb that the queen will hang-out on.

    I appreciate posts that are encouraging, good info and not too judgmental.

    I'd like to say, however, that the trap-out I did was a huge success. In fact, I did an inspection of that hive this morning and the hive is very healthy and the comb is straight on the top bars.


    Got an email from new customer this morning - did trap-out this afternoon

    .
    Last edited by PatBeek; 02-10-2013 at 12:33 PM.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    760

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    .

    I went to Home Depot today and got the parts to build a cheap Bucket Head vac that someone sent me directions to build.

    So, in everyone's opinion, are these bees worth trying to salvage?

    I'm wondering if the chances are good that I can vacuum many of them up, including the queen, and the rest will follow into the bucket (if I leave the lid off for several hours)?

    Or if that doesn't work, bring the bucket of queenless bees to my hive at home that's thriving and place them near the entrance and hopefully the hive takes in the refugees?

    Or do I just douse them all with soapy water and be done with it? I'm going to spray the former hive area regardless with soapy water, but didn't know if the bees are worth it at this point.

    But I figured if I DO get the queen, I can throw them in an empty hive, almost like a package of bees, and they can start building anew.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Richmond, VA UNITED STATES
    Posts
    161

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Here's a couple tricks. You can use a shop vac. Some guys are going to freak when I say that, but what you have to do is tape off the exhaust. It will cause the motor to get hot, so go in spurts, and make sure you have a foam or paper filter on the inside. A small pad of foam helps, but you're mainly trying to slow down the input. Or you can put other holes in the vac body and cover with screen.

    There's a special trick and if it wasn't for my respect for other beekeepers, I would keep it to myself.....


    Get a bottle of Fisher's bee quick. Then, when you have a majority of bees in the new hive, go back to the old hive and spray it, and around it.
    The queen has been actively laying, and she's too fat to fly. Spray, then pull up a chair and sit back and wait. Usually within 5 minutes, I will see a clump of bees within 25 feet (usually less than 10) of the hive. They will be balled up on the ground acting different than other bees in the area. Walk up, brush lightly, and the queen will be there. She has to get away from the smell, but her fat body, and the asphyxiative qualities of the spray will make it hard for her to fly. Bee quick doesn't kill the bees, just drives them away. I have caught the queen many times. I put her in a cage inside the new hive. That causes the other bees to smell her, and if you can put the new hive near the old location, many cases by the night of day 2, you can walk away with 99.9% of the bees.

    Robwok
    www.mongrelbees.com

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
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    760

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    RobWok,

    I am going to look into getting the Bee Quick from a local supplier here in the next day-or-two.

    It's always good to have options. Thanks for the tips.

    Anyhow, I built one of those cheap bee vacs today................well, as cheap as one can get by with.

    Here are the photos:


    The finished product:






    These are the two parts that fit together in order to regulate the suction. The one on the left is the actual holding-tank for the bees. The one on the right is the bottom bucket which twists around the other bucket in order to make the suction holes larger or smaller:





    Here are those two buckets placed together:





    Here's the inside of the holding tank:





    Here's the lid you place on the holding tank when the bucket-vac-motor comes off:





    I mounted a small piece of towel material in the curve of the intake pipe so the bees won't get beat to death:





    If anyone is interested in the directions I used, let me know. I can send you a copy.


    .

  16. #36
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Clarendon County, SC, USA
    Posts
    112

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    The bees will get pretty beat up going down that corregated tubing. If you'll switch it out for something smooth you won't beat up the bees/queen as bad.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    760

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackwater Bees View Post
    The bees will get pretty beat up going down that corregated tubing. If you'll switch it out for something smooth you won't beat up the bees/queen as bad.
    Hmmm, thanks for that tip.

    Well, Home Depot didn't have many accessories in that size of hose.

    I'll have to figure out where to get the right size hose that's non-corrugated.

    .

  18. #38
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rockford, MI
    Posts
    2,092

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    You are learning Pat.... ever so slowly, but learning. lol
    Let us know how the bee vac works.
    Where's the pics and video of the intitial removal? I'm jonesing here already.

  19. #39
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    955

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Have you planned a way to reduce the air flow? A severe restriction on the out side of the vacuum will overcome the limitation of that tubing. You want enough suction to barely lift the bees as you go. Any more than that minimum suction opens the door to damaged bees.
    Lee Burough
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Lakeland, FL USA
    Posts
    760

    Default Re: Just went to scope-out hive underneath a mobile home for soon-to-be cut-out

    Quote Originally Posted by Lburou View Post
    Have you planned a way to reduce the air flow? A severe restriction on the out side of the vacuum will overcome the limitation of that tubing. You want enough suction to barely lift the bees as you go. Any more than that minimum suction opens the door to damaged bees.
    Well, I'm not sure if you saw the photos of the vacuum I made, but the bottom bucket fits around the top bucket with holes that line up. As you twist the two buckets, those holes either restrict or expand in size.....so yes, there is a way to reduce and/or intensify the air flow. I'll just have to experiment to see the sweet-spot setting.

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