Results 1 to 20 of 57

Thread: epipens?

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Huntington, West Virginia, USA
    Posts
    11

    Default epipens?

    I'm finishing my first year and was wondering what NON-allergic beekeepers think in general about keeping an epipen in the house in case of emergencies. I recently tried to get one and even with insurance covering part of the cost, it was 170 dollars, and the shelf life is less than two years from what I understand. Given that I and my family are not allergic, and the neighbors are far away, what is the general consensus on this?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    43,654

    Default Re: epipens?

    I've never seen an epipen... I saw a picture of one once on a bee forum...
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    1,614

    Default Re: epipens?

    I understand your concerns twinbee. I purchased one when I first started, though my cost was much less than what you are stating...more around the $50 mark after insurance. It is a decision that you will have to make. Keeping bees around the house will mean that there *will* be more honey bees flying around the yard, it's only normal. Concern for others is natural. My pen has since expired...as of several months ago. I feel no urgent need to refill the prescription, but I may refill it one day...my choice. It's your decision...your comfort level. I would imagine that only a small percentage of beeks have epi pens on hand, though.

    One caveat... If you do buy a pen, *before* you purchase it or hand over your prescription to the pharmacist, ask to see the expiration date on the pen. As you mentioned, epi pens are good for +/-18 months, but if the pen has already set on the drugstore shelf for 10 months then your getting short changed. I did not think about this until I got home with the one that I bought...when I looked at it it had something like 7-8 months left before the expiration date. I wasn't very happy about that. Next time I will ask to see the actual epi-pen that I will receive (if there is a next time). Naturally, though, "official" websites warn against administering epinephrine to other people as it itself can cause serious problems.

    http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/e...cle/000844.htm

    For me, proximity to an emergency room and availability/quickness of first responders would be a couple of the considerations in the decision making process.

    Best wishes,
    Ed

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Eva, AL, USA
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: epipens?

    I'm non allergic to bees in the sense of the need to use an epipen but I keep one for other allergies. I'm not sure that there is a need to have one unless you are in very remote area and the local EMS may be delayed coming in an emergency. FYI...there is a company that makes a generic epinephine auto inject pen that is much cheaper than the epipen and the twinject pen. I've had all thee. The cost of the generic is great for a two pack but I prefer a two pack of twinject pins...that gives me four doses.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Midland, MI
    Posts
    510

    Default Re: epipens?

    I think it is wise to be aware of teh potential problem. it is also wise to do what you can to prevent unnecessary bee exposure to those that may have an adverse reaction to the sting. Keep water available for the bees, try to influence flight paths to avoid people..etc. If you're worried about legal issues, an individual will have a hard time proving that the stinging bee came from your hive. There are lots of bees out there that could have done it.

    Fact of the matter is that cats scratch, dogs bark, and bees sting. It's just life. While i do carry a 1st aid kit and a suture kit for emergencies, I don't feel it is necessary for me to have a fast acting inhaler for the asthmatics, insulin for the diabetics, or glycerin for those with heart problems. It is my opinion that individuals at risk should prepare themselves. If I knew that i would have an adverse reaction to a sting, i would be prepared for that eventuality....apiary or not.

    For transparency, I do not have bees. This is my first year messing about with these creatures and my opinion may be influenced by time and experience. For now, I say you are a good person to consider others, but you need not provide epipens for them.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Ashburn, VA, USA
    Posts
    149

    Default Re: epipens?

    Just a note, epi pen prescriptions are written for the person who will use the pen (on themselves), and generally not to issue a pen to someone to have around just in case someone else needs it. Some Doctors will write a prescrition for beekeepers to have a pen on hand, others won't. If you were to use your epi pen on another person and something bad happened......misuse of a prescription drug

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Crenshaw County, Alabama
    Posts
    1,614

    Default Re: epipens?

    Quote Originally Posted by KPeacock View Post
    <snip> If you're worried about legal issues, an individual will have a hard time proving that the stinging bee came from your hive. There are lots of bees out there that could have done it.

    Fact of the matter is that cats scratch, dogs bark, and bees sting. It's just life. While i do carry a 1st aid kit and a suture kit for emergencies, <snip>... It is my opinion that individuals at risk should prepare themselves.
    KP, lots of people don't know that they are at risk. People usually don't first go to a doctor or somewhere and ask to be tested for bee venom allergies...they find out they are allergic by being stung, followed by anaphylactic shock symptoms. *Then* they follow up with testing and find that they are indeed at risk. Some people who have never been allergic to bee venom one day suddenly have a very bad reaction...there have been commercial beekeepers that have given up their lifelong work because of sudden deadly allergies. A suture kit, eh?
    Quote Originally Posted by Irmo View Post
    <snip> If you were to use your epi pen on another person and something bad happened......misuse of a prescription drug
    Both of the quoted posts above point to "legal" issues and rightly so. I'm not bashing either of the posters, but pointing out that worries of legal problems appear to be more important to our lawsuit-happy society today than helping someone in need. Kind of a "Dam_ the good Samaritan, I'm covering my butt" mentality.

    So, for a non-allergic beekeeper... Morally right to have an epi pen?...no. Wrong not to have one?...no. Good to have?...yes Probability of needing to use it?....low. Could cause legal problems?...yes. Could save someone's life?...yes. Probability that it will expire before use?...high. Make you feel better to have one on hand?...maybe. Will you purchase one?...your decision.

    Ed

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads