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Thread: Hive material

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Talladega, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    2

    Default Hive material

    I'm a newbe here so I hope I'm in the right place. I have been a bee haver off and on for about thirty years and am trying to become a real beekeeper. I decided since I have the tools i will now build my own hives. I have access to some lumber from Germany and am trying to find out what it is. It resembles pine a lot due to the knots but it seems to be somewhat harder. Does anyone know what it may be and is there any reason I shoulden't use it for hives and frames.
    Thanks, Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Ft Myers, Fl 33967
    Posts
    165

    Default Re: Hive material

    I have no idea what type of wood you have. the description is very vague. However, you can use just about any material you can lay your hands on to make hives, no matter what you decide to use, someone has already been there and done that.
    Regards
    Joe

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    965

    Default Re: Hive material

    I think it might be "bienenstock holz" and well suited to making hives.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Talladega, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Hive material

    Thanks guys. I really dont know how to explain it much better except is white, not yellow and it comes from crates containing auto parts.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Rader, Greene County, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    5,994

    Default Re: Hive material

    Wood crates and pallets that come into the US from other countries must be treated to prevent pests that might be in the wood from entering the US. The two treatment options are either heat (essentially kiln drying) or fumigation.
    https://help.cbp.gov/app/answers/det...kzOVVobA%3D%3D

    The wood must be marked with the treatment method, so you should look for labels on your wood to determine which method was chosen. (I see quite a bit of wood stamped "HT" for heat treated.)

    If the wood was heat treated, it should be stable enough for building woodenware. If it was fumigated, perhaps you should explore more exactly what was used and what kind of persistence it might have.
    ultracrepidarian >> noting or pertaining to a person who criticizes, judges, or gives advice outside of his expertise

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