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Thread: bees in log

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    allen,indiana,usa
    Posts
    124

    Default bees in log

    I got a call that they cut down a tree a week ago and had bees, the log is approx. 5 ft long, maybe 2ft dia, and the bees were in a hole on the side like a broken limb. the wood cutter nailed some screen over the hole and the bees were active back when it was cold. I checked the log today at 59 degrees, the bees were flying and getting in and out under a corner of the screen. The question is what would be the best way to get these bees in a deep super, maybe if it's cold do nothing until warms up, but then what, I can't nail a super over the hole as it's too small and on the side. I've tried cutting logs vertically to extract bees with no success, any ideas here?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pinellass County, Florida
    Posts
    1,074

    Default Re: bees in log

    Trap them out in the spring
    Look here on bs for links on trap outs
    You'll find all you need
    The work like a clock
    IMHO

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,207

    Default Re: bees in log

    The only luck I have had getting bees out of a log is with a splitting wedge. Cut out the comb and tie into frames.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bloomington In
    Posts
    797

    Default Re: bees in log

    I have a limb with bee also. Duke energy had a tree across an electric line that the bees were in. I am waiting for it to warm up, so they can be moved to a hive.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    827

    Default Re: bees in log

    Here it is in pictures, let me know if you have any questions

    http://s7.beta.photobucket.com/user/...ary/Bee%20Tree

    You get the beetree set up as in the pictures. The hivebox has a top entrance and all other entrances are screened closed. You wait for the queen to make it up into the hivebody, then you put an excluder between the box and the tree. 30 Days later remove the log and do with as you wish, should just have honey/pollen left in it, and drones that were trapped by the excluder.

    Rod

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Hudson, WI USA
    Posts
    2,143

    Default Re: bees in log

    Rod, nice simple explanation. Then after 30 days did you move the stump a feet away from the site to get robbed out?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    827

    Default Re: bees in log

    Quote Originally Posted by Adrian Quiney WI View Post
    Rod, nice simple explanation. Then after 30 days did you move the stump a feet away from the site to get robbed out?
    In that particular case, I cut it open and removed the comb. The comb was empty in this case, but this was done in fairly early spring, so I'm guessing they had used or moved anything that had been in there. Allowing a rob out is one options, going ahead and splitting open with the bees gone is another.

    Rod

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Thaxton, Mississippi
    Posts
    453

    Default Re: bees in log

    I agree with Ross. I always do a cutout. Simply cut the log into about 3ft section and split open. Remove the brood and rubber band into frames. Scoop and brush the bees into the new hive or onto the entrance landing. Once you have the queen inside you can walk away and leave the rest to the bees.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Greenville, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,207

    Default Re: bees in log

    Quote Originally Posted by rweakley View Post
    Here it is in pictures, let me know if you have any questions

    http://s7.beta.photobucket.com/user/...ary/Bee%20Tree

    You get the beetree set up as in the pictures. The hivebox has a top entrance and all other entrances are screened closed. You wait for the queen to make it up into the hivebody, then you put an excluder between the box and the tree. 30 Days later remove the log and do with as you wish, should just have honey/pollen left in it, and drones that were trapped by the excluder.

    Rod
    I did that for a year, then split the log and did the cut out. The queen never did move up.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Sullivan, MO
    Posts
    827

    Default Re: bees in log

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    I did that for a year, then split the log and did the cut out. The queen never did move up.
    I don't know your specific situation and all that you did, but my findings were this: 1) All exits/entrances other than the one at the top of the hivebody have to be closed off. 2) It is very helpful to have the log cut in such a way that you cut away log, and leave some comb sticking up into the space of the hivebody. I accounted for this comb by placing medium frames in the spaces that the comb is sticking up. This gives the queen an easy highway up to the box you want them in. With all of the new reasources coming in at the top, and (assuming you put drawn out comb in the box) they have readily available space to put it in, that is where they are going to heard Momma to.

    As I've said before NOTHING in beekeeping is absolute. We're dealing with a wild animal that will have it's own notions about things.

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