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  1. #161
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    191

    Default Re: Treatment-Free, Winter 2012-2013, How's it going?

    I simply stack up the supers outside with frames and combs, and unimpeded air flow prevents the problem. Wax moths hate air flow, and sun. It's worked for me. I just used two 1x2's inbetween each box (sometimes bed slats ... hey, it's what I had on hand at the time), but it was during winter. Rain was not a problem. Just put a top on the top box and the air flow will dry out any combs on the edges that get a little rain.

  2. #162
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Stillwell, KS
    Posts
    649

    Default Re: Treatment-Free, Winter 2012-2013, How's it going?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldtimer View Post

    However, pleasant surprise! of the 21, 3 were queenless, as the last round of queen cells that went in around a month ago, 3 had failed to mate. So I pulled dividers and combined them with their neighbors. Last time I went there, when caged queens and planted cells a month ago, a number of nucs were looking poorly with mites, pms and dwv. This time, amazingly, all those nucs were fine. Not a sign of a mite.

    Just wish somebody new how that works.

    Careful now Kiwi, you are going to spoil your master plan.

  3. #163
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    191

    Default Re: Treatment-Free, Winter 2012-2013, How's it going?

    Is there anything about keeping bees in nucs that keep the mite levels down? My mite counts on my double-stacked nuc boxes were lower %-wise last summer than my standard deeps. Or was it luck of the draw?

  4. #164
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    727

    Default Re: Treatment-Free, Winter 2012-2013, How's it going?

    I removed a section of the roof on my storage shed and replaced it with clear corrugated plastic panels. I hang frames from the bottoms of the trusses so that air and light get to them which keeps wax moth damage to an absolute minimum. Sometimes I lose a frame of good comb if the wind knocks a frame down and the comb breaks, I also get dirt/dust in the combs while they hang... Airflow and sunlight
    Zone 5a @ 4700 ft. High Desert
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  5. #165
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,152

    Default Re: Treatment-Free, Winter 2012-2013, How's it going?

    OK well I'll do it, store them with plenty ventilation & see what happens. I'll be watching like a hawk though, a lot of effort went into getting those small cell combs.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Davidson View Post
    Is there anything about keeping bees in nucs that keep the mite levels down? My mite counts on my double-stacked nuc boxes were lower %-wise last summer than my standard deeps. Or was it luck of the draw?
    There has always been less mites in my nucs than the hives, whether treated, or not. I think it's because the nucs get constant brood breaks, every time a queen is removed and they are given a new queen cell.

    There is also something about location, some of my sites the bees (treated or not), get less mites, than at other sites. It is easy to understand about the nucs with brood breaks, how location affects is less clear.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

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