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  1. #61
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Ravensdale, Washington, USA
    Posts
    16

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    Do not yet know how long it will last but I am using Ultra Premium Red Label Penofin on cedar hives. Time will tell in this wet (western Washington State) climate. My neighbor used it on his cedar fence about 5 years ago... It still looks great. A bit pricy but after all the money I have put into equipment the finish is the least of the expenses...
    April 21, 2014 - 3 Hives - 2 packages and 1 swarm

  2. #62
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Baytown, TX., USA.
    Posts
    651

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    Consumers Reports is testing Bher deck stain and it has passed six years going for nine and still passing their requirements. I use it and only in white.
    Julysun elevation 23 feet. 4 Hives, 2 years.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    North Okananagan BC Canada
    Posts
    69

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    Since we are talking finishes, has anyone tried wax dipping. I have read about it and seen wood ware for sale that's paraffin dipped, I have my first 20 to finish and while wax looks good, buying a life time supply to fill a metal melting pot deep enough to immerse a super seems very expensive. Has anyone tried it?

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,927

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    I have not tried it but I have seen some suggestions on how to build a dipping tank that reduces the amount of wax required to fill it. Since you do not need wax in the center portion. place blocks bricks of fashion a box to fill that space reducing the volume that needs to be filled with wax. basically you are creating a channel that the hive box will fit down into and be submerged.

    Now having said that I will also add that if wax seems expensive to fill a tank it will still be expensive when coating a hive. I have heard it works well but you want to use a paraffin wax or a mix of paraffin and beeswax. I have also seen comments about sources for wax that are much lower price than would be typically found. I would have to go do some searching to find that information again if i was able to find it at all. I have seen several conversations on wax dipping of hives over the past couple of years though.

    I will also add this which is something I have not seen anyone else comment on. With my experience of wood and wood stabilization. That means taking out the properties of wood that cause it to con tract and expand. Which is actually pretty extensive. I not only see reason for wax dipping to be a far better treatment for wood. But if done at high enough temperatures and with the addition of pressure I think you could come very close to removing the expansion and contraction from your hive bodies.

    Lumber expands and contracts with moisture changes because the cells within that wood are still in tact. They act something like little bottles that will fill with water when they get wet. when they get wet they swell.

    There are two ways to prevent this swelling. One prevent the cells from getting wet. or two rupture them basically breaking the bottle. Since the cells being intact also gives wood it's strength the second option is not a very desirable one. So taht leaves us with preventing the cell from gettign wet.

    You can prevent a cell from getting wet by trying to make a water tight barrier between it and the water. that is what paint is basically doing. Or you can fill the space the water would go with something else. Like wax. Filling the cell with something else is called stabilization. It can actually be done with plastics with the correct equipment. I suspect it can be done with wax with far less precision.

    In all done correctly I believe wax dipping would go far beyond simply painting to preserve equipment. But it woudl require it is done in a way that allows the wax to penetrate the cells of the wood.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    830

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    In all of my woodworking classes and personal experiences you won't eliminate the expansion and contraction with wax. YOu can reduce it and protect it so that it beads off and doesn't penetrate, however if in the summer it's humid that moisture will get into the wood. As in the winter when it's bone dry that will dry out the wood also. I have also read of wax dipping and it seems great. The issue in my mind isn't the wax, but the tank and element / elements to heat it. The tank would need to be stainless or it will rust over time. Also the heating element would need to be protected so that the wax doesn't touch it, or it needs to be a burner under the tank. I was a cabinet maker for several years, and now am a welder. It's interesting knowing stuff from both sides.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,927

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    Delber, Have you ever used stabilized wood? Since the term has begun to be used to refer to multiple process of varying degrees of effectiveness I offer this as the standard for what I considered stabilized.
    http://www.stabilizedwood.com/

    It does remove all the typical properties of movement from the wood. I have been using such wood for nearly 12 years.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Coatesville, Pa, USA
    Posts
    830

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    Daniel, Thanks for the education. I haven't seen this at all. In rereading your above post I do see your mentioning it, but you don't seem to go into detail as the website does, but I can see your point. Do you use this for your boxes? It seems to me that it'd be a good way to protect the wood, however it would be a expensive way to go and increasing the boxes from 50-150% in weight could also be a issue. They'd be more durable which is a plus. If you do use this for your boxes, do you ship it to them assembled or unassembled? If it's unassembled, I assume you can assemble it after it's done, but how do you do that? The process is a pressure application of resins that totally fills all of the cells of the wood making it both heavier and much harder. They say on one place that the wood can actually split if you hit it with a hammer seemingly similar to hitting a rock with a hammer.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Campbell River, British Columbia Canada
    Posts
    105

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    I go to the local paint store and buy the highest quality paint they have in the miss tint bin it usually around 10/g for the high end exterior paint that is usually 50/g, i dont care what colour the boxes are, i almost always end up with a green beige type colour (i am sure my gf can tell me what it is actually called)
    I use this cheap paint all over my farm and everything matches

    it is very damp rain forest where i live so any unprotected wood doesnt last more than a couple years, pine and hemlock are the worst around here, western red cedar is not too expensive here so many build hives with that and dont paint them.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    307

    Default Re: Paint/Stain What do you use/How long is it lasting?

    Quote Originally Posted by toekneepea View Post
    Phil, the finish does create the dull look, my boxes were unpainted new wood and they dulled to the same look as well.

    Cheers,
    Tony P.
    All beekeeping is local. Your environment may vary, but The Eco-Wood Treatment is junk (here in New England) and should be avoided. Boxes lasted less than 3 years before they started warping and cracking.

    Tony P.
    There must be a harder way to do that... let me find it for you.

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