Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    siskiyou county, CA, USA
    Posts
    7

    Default a few qustions from a starter

    Hi...I am a beginner. This is my first season beekeeping. I have a couple of questions. I have 2 hives about 3 feet apart. I got 2 packages delivered to me this May. They both seemed to be doing all right until recently. It seems as though one hive has efb. Well, I am still feeding them with a top feeder. And going to order a new queen on Monday. The problem is that The middle frames in my brood box are built together and I cannot get them apart without seriously disturbing the hive. So....My first question is can I introduce a new queen with the old one in there? I just can't seem to find the old girl but there is fresh brood. THe next question is about my entrance reducer. I still have it on because I am feeding. It seems to be really crowded at the middle of the day. Should the reducer still be on? And last, It is quite hot where I live about 100 most days. The bees get sun from sun up until about 2:30. It is pretty darn hot mid day. Is this to hot? Should I have them in more shade?
    Thanks so much to everyone on this forum. I really appreciate all of the feedback!!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Bloomington In
    Posts
    788

    Default Re: a few qustions from a starter

    The old queen will kill the new queen before she get released. Remove the reducer and full sun is ok.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Washington County, Maine
    Posts
    2,945

    Default Re: a few qustions from a starter

    The current queen must be removed or killed before a new queen can be introduced. Best practice is to wait 6-12 hours before introducing the new queen.

    The frames in the brood box are meant to be removable for inspections. If they are not easily removed you have some maintenance to do. Remove an outside frame to give yourself room to work. Then use your hive tool as a lever to separate the frames. I try to keep the top bars free of comb on the sides of the bar. Yes sometimes scraping it off does away with comb that the bees have built (and sometimes the queen has laid in) but it makes inspections ever so much easier. A little bit of smoke chases the bees away before scraping.

    Sometimes the thought of seriously disturbing the hive is really an excuse justifying inaction. Sometimes the concern is real. In any event you are either a beekeeper or you're not.

    To echo Birdman, remove the reducer and full sun is ok.
    Master Beekeeper (EAS) and Master Gardener (U Maine CE) www.beeberrywoods.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Dayton, OH USA
    Posts
    303

    Default Re: a few qustions from a starter

    One question I would have for you is why are you ordering a new queen? A new queen won't necessarily solve the EFB problem, if in fact you have it. If both queens are laying well and appear to be in good health, why replace one so soon? If your other hive has plentiful brood, I would consider adding a frame or two of capped brood and allowing the current queen to continue.

    Do you have a friend or contact who is an experienced beekeeper who can help you tell whether you in fact have EFB and the condition of your queens?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Massillon, Ohio
    Posts
    3,429

    Default Re: a few qustions from a starter

    As mentioned by Andrew you need to deal with the comb issue and not ignore it, it's not going to go away on it's own and will only get worse over time. The bees are not going to like it but it's one of those routine procedures which we need to stay up with. When you get to the center of the brood box a couple puffs of smoke between the frames will help clear it of some of the bees so you have room to work. If it's really bad you may need to cut some of the comb between the top bars to be able to pry the frames apart without a lot of tearing. I like to use a serrated bread knife for the cleanest cut. Trim the wacky comb and put it back together, the bees will take care of the rest.

    As far as continuing to feed, that's a local judgement call. Are they still drawing out comb? If they are, and your flow is light, then you could keep feeding. Do they have plenty of syrup stored up? If so then you may want to stop feeding for a while and monitor closely any changes in their stores. If they burn through it quickly you can always start feeding again.
    To everything there is a season....

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads