Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    191

    Default My first dead-out

    I don't know where this thread should be, but I love this forum so this is where it's going. I'm certain I have my first dead-out, a nuc from a 10-frame deep with a single shallow above. There was little traffic on super warm days when all hives were jamming (sign #1), and my stethoscope and knock test have yielded a silent hive (sign #2 and #3). My first mentor was wise to tell me to not knock myself for a dead-out (though that's hard to do, I'm finding). He said that was time to re-evaluate, learn and re-apportion assets, all of which are invaluable to the beekeeper. I wasted no time in giving the untouched candy block from the suspected dead-out to a super strong double-stacked 5-frame nuc that had devoured it's candy. My stethoscope and knock test yielded another very weak hive with an untouched candy block (and honey stores just below), so I gave it's candy block to the other double-stacked 5-frame nuc that had devoured it's first candy block. I will clean out the equipment from the dead-out at my first opportunity, namely tomorrow (it'll be cold, but if it's a dead-out who cares?).

    All of this makes me believe that winter is the time for re-thinking your methods, learning from your mistakes (such as not combining when I should have, namely the dead-out with the currently weak hive), and planning for the future (which hives to make splits off of ). My one nuc that came from a single frame of survivor bees with an emergency cell from a trap-out is going strong. It hasn't died but has multiplied and is gentle. I'm going to split that when I can to spread those great genetics, and get their sisters and complete the trap-out this spring when I can. At the same time, I'm glad to have had such a cool mentor who educated me in the benefits of failure. Now it's time to pay it forward.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Auckland,Auckland,New Zealand
    Posts
    6,064

    Default Re: My first dead-out

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Davidson View Post
    All of this makes me believe that winter is the time for re-thinking your methods, learning from your mistakes.
    Exactly.

    One of the best things a beekeeper can do is ensure his hives going into winter are properly fed, properly housed, and healthy. Get that right, won't have too many issues.
    44 years, been commercial, outfits up to 4000 hives, now 120 hives and 200 nucs as a hobby, selling bees. T (mostly).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Big Stone Gap, VA
    Posts
    989

    Default Re: My first dead-out

    Sorry about your dead out,

    Just remember, sometimes hives just die.

    Shane

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pueblo, Colorado, USA
    Posts
    716

    Default Re: My first dead-out

    Had 1 deadout so far this year. It was a starve out and it left me with beautiful drawn comb. Think they did me a favor for swarm season.
    Zone 5a @ 4700 ft. High Desert
    Facebook

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    191

    Default Re: My first dead-out

    Thanks, everyone. I realized today that I saw that hive (and one other) weakening over the course of a very warm month. Instead of accepting it for what it was, I guess those boxes became boxes of hope in my mind, rather than what they were. And now they aren't boxes of failure, they just are what they are. Accepting what you're seeing is a lesson I've learned. My question is, once in winter and one or two hives are weakening, should you combine them (how, if they have two queens) or feed or just let 'em be and be thankful for the extra equipment they're freeing up for the following spring?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads