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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Mount Hope, New York
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    4

    Post

    Hi Everyone,
    I experienced last year, that one of my hive swarm and hit the road. The bees were flying just as normal swarm does, but all the sudden I got little suspecious because they were flying above the trees and flew away. Also several years back I notice a swarm flying about 30 ft high. I ran after them but I lost them above the trees. My question is how you can stop the swarm in situation like this?
    Kris Lyko

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

    Post

    Can't stop a swarm once they come out of the hive; unless the queen doesn't join them, for whatever reason. Next time, just stand there and marvel at the honeybee's age-old way of propagating the species. [img]smile.gif[/img] If you want to keep them from swarming keep that brood nest open by inserting empty frames in between the full ones. Use the search function here to learn more about that. Search 'open brood nest', etc. I have been keeping a wordperfect document of information about this same topic. So if you want to read what I've saved as important swarm prevention and small cell info, just send me a private message with your e-mail and I'll send it to you.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

    Post

    duplicate post

    [size="1"][ January 31, 2006, 11:07 PM: Message edited by: kenpkr ][/size]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

    Post

    duplicate post :mad:

    [size="1"][ January 31, 2006, 11:09 PM: Message edited by: kenpkr ][/size]

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Alpharetta, GA, USA
    Posts
    520

    Post

    duplicate post

    [size="1"][ January 31, 2006, 11:08 PM: Message edited by: kenpkr ][/size]

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

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    I have never tried it, but they used to beat pots and pans and drums and they said that would settle a swarm. I think a sheet of metal that makes a sound more like thunder might be more effetive, but I've never tried it. I suppose it would have to loud enough for the bees to sense the vibration to be of any value, if it works at all.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Worthington, Pennsylvania USA
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    1,848

    Post

    The best acvice I can think of right now is to place a vacant hive or swarm trap in the vacinity of your hive, since you can't stop them maybe they will move in the vacant hive for you!
    "Younz" have a great day, I will.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    As MB says, many old beekeepers believe a loud noise, like beating on metal will do it. I had one in the air last year and the only thing around was a 2 foot 2x4 and my extractor sitting upside down. I did beat on it and they did land, but is that what made them land, or would they have landed anyway. Your guess is as good as mine.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

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    Michael Bush: "I have never tried it, but they used to beat pots and pans and drums and they said that would settle a swarm."

    Hi, my name is Grant and I can openly admit that I bang pots.

    In the hopes of "settling" a swarm, a swarm in the midst of flight, I've banged a few pots in my day--didn't help, but I have friends who have tried it and it worked for them.

    Or maybe something else worked to settle the swarm as they senselessly banged those pots. Supposedly, it only works when the swarm is in flight.

    This idea of banging pots is a long-forgotten practice called "tanging." Back in the old days, if a swarm landed on your property, you could claim it as yours. If your bees swarmed to the nieghbors property, the neighbors were considered to be the new owners of those bees.

    "Tanging," or banging those pots, was the way you could legally hop a fence and chase the swarm, basically communicating to everyone within earshot that this was your swarm, banging a pot (or whatever was handy to make a noise) signalled to the world that you were laying claim to this swarm, and further, you were trespassing in a non-offensive way in hopes of retreiving your swarm.

    And after a few hundred yards, as you followed with a banging pot, the swarm settled. Which led many people to say, "Hey! It works!"

    Cause and effect? I doubt it. Bees don't have ears. Do they detect vibrations? It's pretty far to pick those up, especially with the whirring sound of a swarm in flight.

    Pure coincidence? A mutually exclusive occurence between a banging pot and the swarm settling? Very likely. But lots of swarm chasers try it and the swarms settle.

    There was supposed to be another practice of "drumming" a log or hive body to intice the bees to come in.

    Now that is one thing I won't admit to doing.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    Posts
    5,159

    Post

    You would have better luck putting one of Jim's tin foil hats on and assuming the yoga position humming loudly

    Now the surefire way to bring a few of them down is to fire about ten rounds of #9 one ounce 12 ga loads into the thick of the swarm, now you won't get all of them, but you are sure to get a few down. [img]tongue.gif[/img]
    Bullseye Bill in The Scenic Flint Hills , KS
    www.myspace.com/dukewilliam

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,755

    Post

    This almost mimics the proposal I made on organicbeekeepers. I thought that someone should get a grant to study the effects of loud noises on beeheives.

    Stand beside your colony with your shot gum and fire off a round and report the colony reaction. I'd do it myself, but I don't own a shot gun. The staple gun is the only firearm that I have. I should get training and a permit for that too.

    Please report your results. I have a hunch of what will happen, but I don't want to influence that outcome.
    Mark Berninghausen To combat Ebola, please consider supporting http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Troupsburg, NY
    Posts
    4,072

    Post

    "shot gum"

    I don't own one of these either , But I do have a shotgun. Never tried gettin them thar swarms thatta way , shore might be interesting to try though .
    "I reject your reality, and substitute my own." Adam Savage

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Kirkland, WA, USA
    Posts
    1,020

    Post

    I have witnessed the "pots and pans" method of "moving" a swarm - it was fascinating. I doubt ONE person banging a pot or pan would do anything though.
    http://www.voiceofthehive.com - Tales of Beekeeping and Honeybees

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

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    I tried one of Jim's foil hats. They're wonderful, waterproof and no one knows you didn't shower that day. I recommend them for shopping trips, overnight conventions, and if you're stuck with a bunch of potatoes and a hot oven, they easily convert to culinary objectives.

    He also recommended swinging a dead skunk on the end of a rope to get rid of varroa mites in response to mite solutions in another forum. I tried that too, but found out later I was swinging it clock-wise when you need to swing it counter-clock-wise. I still had mites after my clock-wise treatment.

    I hear clock-wise only works on small hive beetles. It must have worked. So far, no signs of small hive beetles in my bee yards. And it must have some response in dogs because mine grows at me everytime I give my yards a treatment.

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    1,858

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    Okay, on a more serious note: Is there any way to drive bees out of a cavity with noise and/or vibration that would incite the entire colony to vacate?

    I get a number of calls from homeowners in nice brick homes to remove bees from wall cavities, or someone with a lovely, mature tree who wants the bees out, but doesn't exactly like the idea of killing them.

    I tried some of the bee-go, bee quick, immitation almond extract with limited success of chasing some of the bees out. Mostly I get the former on myself and my van stinks for weeks.

    Any ideas?

    Grant
    Jackson, MO
    Beekeeping With Twenty-five Hives: https://www.createspace.com/4152725

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,384

    Post

    Drumming and smoking both will drive SOME of the bees out, but nothing I know of will drive all the bees out. But then I haven't tried Bee quick. Drumming is just doing a tap tap tap on the hive (or the inside wall of the brick house).
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    New York City
    Posts
    3,401

    Post

    Blow repellent into the cavity with a soaked
    cloth placed over the hose nozzle of a bee-vac,
    and the hose plugged into the exhaust port of
    the bee-vac (or shop vac).

    The trick is to find a point in the
    cavity, but at the far end of the hive from the
    entrance. This may require the use of a infra-red
    spot thermometer on an otherwise chilly night
    to find the extent of the colony, or it may
    require some work to remove a few bricks and peek
    with a dental mirror.

    Cleaning out the comb is another problem, perhaps
    solved by dropping in a goodly number of wax
    moth larvae.

    There simply is no "magic" to the process, one
    drives out as many bees as possible, or uses
    a cone escape to force the colony to slowly
    depopulate, and then, once enough bees are
    removed, one opens up the wall and removes
    the comb. Some would say that the direct
    approach would be best, to open up the wall
    and simply do the job directly.

    Every removal is different, so there are no
    possible "solutions" unless photos are offered
    to allow examination. Only general advice is
    possible.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Greensboro, N.C.
    Posts
    5,080

    Post

    >>>Okay, on a more serious note: Is there any way to drive bees out of a cavity with noise <<<

    On a not so serious note, yes, there is a very effective way. I think it is called "implosion".

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    27,755

    Post

    I was serious, too. I don't think that bees can hear. So, the corolation between tanging bees and their landing is coincidence, not cause and effect. Oh, opinion of mine.
    Mark Berninghausen To combat Ebola, please consider supporting http://www.doctorswithoutborders.org


  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Kirkland, WA, USA
    Posts
    1,020

    Post

    Sqkcrk - In the case where I watched someone "move" a swarm with pots and pans, the most interesting thing was not the swarm - it was the parent hive. They were noticably agitated, and according to the local beekeeper, that was a common effect.

    Then again, I believe that belief, not fact drove most of their actions, and that their beliefs were tailored to match the normal swarm behavior.
    http://www.voiceofthehive.com - Tales of Beekeeping and Honeybees

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