Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,225

    Default Fermenting in a Dark Place

    Until recently I did not know you were suppose to keep your fermenting in the dark.
    The last batch I just started I left on the counter in the carboy for 5 days. It was not exposed to direct sunlight. Just wondering if it will make a difference in the taste. It's been moved to a dark room.

    Does everyone else keep the mead in a dark place?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    4,085

    Default Re: Fermenting in a Dark Place

    'They' always say only ferment in the dark but a lot of people do it and can't tell the difference in product. I would like iron clad scientific clarification myself. I doubt algae is going to be growing in an active must or wort anyway

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Pottstown, Pennyslvania, USA
    Posts
    382

    Default Re: Fermenting in a Dark Place

    I'm not certain about this response, but I know that beer can get "skunky" if exposed to bright light for a period of time. It's probably the same reason that beverages shouldn't be fermented under the same conditions. I doubt you need total darkness, but I wouldn't leave my beer, wine, or mead, in a sun porch, or other bright area for any length of time. The basement, or closet, works fine.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Gaithersburg, MD
    Posts
    363

    Default Re: Fermenting in a Dark Place

    Quote Originally Posted by DPBsbees View Post
    I'm not certain about this response, but I know that beer can get "skunky" if exposed to bright light for a period of time. It's probably the same reason that beverages shouldn't be fermented under the same conditions. I doubt you need total darkness, but I wouldn't leave my beer, wine, or mead, in a sun porch, or other bright area for any length of time. The basement, or closet, works fine.
    For beer it is the light reacting w/ compounds from the hops that can lead to the "skunkiness". If you didn't use hops in the mead then you probably won't be able to tell. Even if the light reacts w/ other stuff I doubt it would cause a perceptible difference to the average drinker.

    Have never made mead but it has been on my list for years. Now that I started keeping bees the main obstacle has been overcome (cost of the honey needed). Though i've spent a good bit on equipment which will hopefully be re-couped in honey sales next year!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Jefferson Co., WV, USA
    Posts
    157

    Default Re: Fermenting in a Dark Place

    More like red wines shouldnt be exposed to a lot of light especiallly after they are bottled, if you are making a straight mead without anything else dont worry. I put paper grocery bags with a hole cut in the bottome over our carboys when they are bulk aging because they might be there for a while. JC, once you start making mead you wont have any left to sell, there are to many recipes to try out! WVMJ
    Meadmaking with WVMJ at Meads and Elderberry Winemaking

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Lyons, CO
    Posts
    3,046

    Default Re: Fermenting in a Dark Place

    Jclark is correct; the energetic ultraviolet wavelengths (even from fluorescent lighting) impact and break up the isomerized hop acids, changing them into mercaptans (yes, just like a skunk uses). The reaction can occur in minutes in strong sunlight, even over the course of drinking a pint. Lighter-colored beers are naturally more vulnerable. Brown glass blocks the implicated wavelengths, which is why brown glass is such a standard.

    I don't worry about covering up mead ferments or bottles so much; but the protect-from-light routine is so much a part of my DNA that it often happens anyways.
    Bees, brews and fun
    in Lyons, CO

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    KC, MO, USA
    Posts
    1,225

    Default Re: Fermenting in a Dark Place

    Thanks all

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    IG, Slovenia
    Posts
    21

    Default Re: Fermenting in a Dark Place

    Just to expand, it is not only about covering up the mead as it is will keeping the temperature level the same. Some beers for example have been fermented in caves to achieve a lower yet constant temperature.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads