Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    NE Calif.
    Posts
    2,271

    Default IGRs a problem in almond pollen?

    IGRs at Bloom: Bad Idea?
    http://thealmonddoctor.com/almond/ig...loom-bad-idea/

    And this:

    8. Johnson, R. & E. Percel. The EFFECTS OF THE FUNGICIDE PRISTINE ON QUEEN REARING. The Ohio State University, Department of Entomology, Wooster, OH

    There have been reports by commercial queen producers of occasional unexplained loss of large numbers of developing queens in the larval or pupal stage. Many of the affected queen-rearing operations are situated among the almond orchards of California and report these losses in the weeks after almond trees bloom. Almond flowers are a rich foraging resource for bees, but are also commonly treated with fungicides, insecticides and spray adjuvants during bloom to control pests and pathogens. Queen producers have associated queen developmental problems with application of the fungicide Pristine, which contains the active incredients boscalid and pyraclostrobin, and the spray adjuvants containing organosilicone compounds. To test the effect of these pesticides queens were reared in closed swarm boxes for four days, until capping, with nurse bees fed pollen treated with four concentrations of Pristine (0.4, 4, 40 and 400 ppm), an organosilicone-containing spray adjuvant (Break-Thru, 200 ppm), the combination of Pristine and Break-Thru (400: 200 ppm), diflubenzuron (100 ppm) as a positive control or water as negative control. Low concentrations of pyraclostrobin (50 ppb), but no boscalid, was detectable in royal jelly fed to queens in the 400 ppm Pristine treatment. No significant difference in queen survival to capping or adult queen emergence was observed between any of the experimental treatments and the negative control. Only diflubenzuron, the positive control, caused a substantial reduction in queen cell capping. Interestingly, diflubenzuron use in almonds during bloom, at roughly the same time and scale as Pristine application, has seen on a steady increase over the last decade. Future work should focus on the role of diflubenzuron, possibly in combination with other pesticides, on queen development, survival and success.
    ==========
    Closing in on the problem?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Portland, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    225

    Default Re: IGRs a problem in almond pollen?

    I know I am dumb, but what are IGRs?

    Thanks
    Beeman
    All things may be lawful; but not all things are advantagous.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,083

    Default Re: IGRs a problem in almond pollen?

    Quote Originally Posted by loggermike View Post
    IGRs at Bloom: Bad Idea?
    http://thealmonddoctor.com/almond/ig...loom-bad-idea/

    And this:

    8. Johnson, R. & E. Percel. The EFFECTS OF THE FUNGICIDE PRISTINE ON QUEEN REARING. The Ohio State University, Department of Entomology, Wooster, OH

    There have been reports by commercial queen producers of occasional unexplained loss of large numbers of developing queens in the larval or pupal stage. Many of the affected queen-rearing operations are situated among the almond orchards of California and report these losses in the weeks after almond trees bloom. Almond flowers are a rich foraging resource for bees, but are also commonly treated with fungicides, insecticides and spray adjuvants during bloom to control pests and pathogens. Queen producers have associated queen developmental problems with application of the fungicide Pristine, which contains the active incredients boscalid and pyraclostrobin, and the spray adjuvants containing organosilicone compounds. To test the effect of these pesticides queens were reared in closed swarm boxes for four days, until capping, with nurse bees fed pollen treated with four concentrations of Pristine (0.4, 4, 40 and 400 ppm), an organosilicone-containing spray adjuvant (Break-Thru, 200 ppm), the combination of Pristine and Break-Thru (400: 200 ppm), diflubenzuron (100 ppm) as a positive control or water as negative control. Low concentrations of pyraclostrobin (50 ppb), but no boscalid, was detectable in royal jelly fed to queens in the 400 ppm Pristine treatment. No significant difference in queen survival to capping or adult queen emergence was observed between any of the experimental treatments and the negative control. Only diflubenzuron, the positive control, caused a substantial reduction in queen cell capping. Interestingly, diflubenzuron use in almonds during bloom, at roughly the same time and scale as Pristine application, has seen on a steady increase over the last decade. Future work should focus on the role of diflubenzuron, possibly in combination with other pesticides, on queen development, survival and success.
    ==========
    Closing in on the problem?

    Eric Mussen gave a talk at the queen breeders meeting last Thursday in Ord Bend regarding this issue. Looks like the use of IGR's at fungicidal application time during bloom is a highly likely culprit in the demise of many queen cells a couple of weeks later. Putting two and two together with the beeks, pest advisors, and researchers at the meeting a high corellation regarding the beginning of the qc problems begging with the commencement of the use of the IGR's a few years back was established. Was thinking last night I ought to tell my growers that if they are going to use this stuff I need a 2 days heads up to bail out or they can fork over another 50 bucks for almond pollination. Use during bloom needs to be banned. Dead queen cells are not something I really want.....
    Last edited by Honey-4-All; 01-19-2013 at 09:18 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Silverton, OR, USA
    Posts
    68

    Default Re: IGRs a problem in almond pollen?

    insect growth regulators

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Portland, Tennessee, USA
    Posts
    225

    Default Re: IGRs a problem in almond pollen?

    Quote Originally Posted by beebze View Post
    insect growth regulators
    Thanks. Always seeking to be educated.
    Beeman
    All things may be lawful; but not all things are advantagous.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,083

    Default Re: IGRs a problem in almond pollen?

    Quote Originally Posted by beeman2009 View Post
    Thanks. Always seeking to be educated.

    If I understand the scenario correctly here's whats happening.

    To control peach twig borer the growers used to use dormant spray(oil) . Because of runoff issues in the Sacramento river the window of usage was diminished. Once that happened growers looked for alternatives for control. One option was to use IGR's.

    Their use at the same time as fungicide application during the end of almond bloom allowed the foragers to carry the stuff home with the pollen. Once inside the hive it presence inhibits larval development by one of two modes depending on what class of chems being used. Bottom line is people were having issues with queen cells failing as a result.
    Last edited by Honey-4-All; 01-19-2013 at 05:32 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Herrick, SD USA
    Posts
    4,044

    Default Re: IGRs a problem in almond pollen?

    Queen cells are the "canary in the coal mine" in regards to hive health. I have seen an apparently healthy hive unable to raise healthy queen cells. In our case the problem is usually Yellow Jasmine pollen. The really frustrating thing is they may look fine up until about day 5 and then the bees will begin to chew them out. It is why I prefer to leave my cells in the builder until at least day 9. I feel the bees can do the best job of culling the undesirable cells if there is a problem. I have heard from other cell producers that they might have bouts with unhealthy cells and never find out the cause as it may go away as quickly as it came.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads