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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Redmond Oregon
    Posts
    170

    Default Requeening a Package

    I want to try something this year but before I do I would like some feedback. In an attempt to give my stock a better chance at surviving without treatment I am looking to order up "Survivor" trait queens and put the survivor queen in the package to be released in place of the queen that came with the package. (The replacement queen would be added the same day I get the package.) I have purchased "stock" packages of bees since beginning beekeeping and they simply dont last. Therefore I end up purchasing more bees each year. I want to attempt to upgrade my hives with queens that are bred to survive treatment free.

    So two questions. Anyone see a problem with this? If so what would it be?

    Second question - Can you suggest someone who sells "survivor" queens. I know of Oliverez (sp?) but would like to look into others just for comparison purposes.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Jacksonville, Florida
    Posts
    1,484

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    Sure you could do that. I think logistically it maybe more challenging. Making sure the packages and the queens arrive at the same time. It maybe easier to requeen the packages later on in the year once they are up and going.

    I thought Oliverez sell package bees? Why not buy packages straight from them and skip the requeening.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Redmond Oregon
    Posts
    170

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    There is the logistics side of it, but I think I have that worked out. If not I can certainly do as you suggest. I live in Oregon and have few options for "survivor" type bees. I'm too far away to pick up packages from Oliverez. If they, or someone else for that matter was closer, that would certainly be the way to go, but I just dont have those kind of options available to me.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Great Falls Montana
    Posts
    3,507

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    It is your money and you have a right to spend it any way you want. That being said, you are being silly and wasting money. You are courting disaster by trying to get frangible commodities that are very dependent on the whims of nature to successfully 'tie' each other at your location. Do your research and find the bloodline and vendor of your dreams. It is a sure thing that quality queens will be much more available in July than in the spring. You may also get a better price.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Redmond Oregon
    Posts
    170

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    Hmmmm. Maybe not a bad idea. Our season is so short here I'm always thinking of getting right on things as soon as possible.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    SALEM, OREGON
    Posts
    47

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    i think you should post this in the fantasy forum

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,077

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    Two things,

    I would place both queens in the cluster once you pour the bees. Leave the caps on both queens. Remove the sugar caps on the one you want "out" after 2 days and let the bees chew her out. Pull the "old queen" out at the same time. Let em rip>>>>

    Your bigger challenge is finding true "survivor" queen stock. Besides anecdotal evidence which many folks claim to have achieved I was wondering what "Statistical analysis" you are looking for/ are requiring in determining your "survivor" choices?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Redmond Oregon
    Posts
    170

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    Basically I'm looking for stock that receives no treatment. They survive on their own. There are also places where the queens a bred for these traits. You have to understand I'm going the no treatment route. My own experience shows little success with treating and so I am simply looking for bees that come from stock that has shown it has what it takes to make it on its own. It cant be any worse than buying bees every year because the "over the counter" bees dont make it.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,077

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    Quote Originally Posted by whalers View Post
    Basically I'm looking for stock that receives no treatment. They survive on their own. There are also places where the queens a bred for these traits. You have to understand I'm going the no treatment route. My own experience shows little success with treating and so I am simply looking for bees that come from stock that has shown it has what it takes to make it on its own. It cant be any worse than buying bees every year because the "over the counter" bees dont make it.
    And who would be on that no treatment list? Are they willing to let you put a lie detector machine in front of everyone involved in the operation when you ask about "no treatments? How long is "surviving on their own?" 3 months, ! year, 2 years? Forever like the old days? Is this for mites, viruses, Afb? Efb?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Westchester NY
    Posts
    231

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    I dont want to sound argumentative, but how do you know treatments do not work--what treatments have you personally used that have led you to not want to try any?
    http://www.peekskillnurseries.com
    Specialists in Ground Cover plants since 1937

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rowan County NC
    Posts
    341

    Default Re: Requeening a Package

    I am not in your area...but you can find "treatment Free" queens for sale in a lot of different places. You can find supposed mite tolerant bees in tons of locations. As far as what bee would adapt to the cold? I can say. I have read that Buckfast has good adaptability, and Russians are supposed to be cold hardy and mite tolerant. So I would suggest, trying a few different types of queens and see what does best. If you use several types of queens and they still don't survive, then it may have something to do with management practices. My bees are treatment free, but they are well managed. IMO

    Anyway, whichever bee makes it out of the winter the best...maybe stick with those.
    "You have to put down the ducky if you wanna play the Saxophone!" Mr .Hoot

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