Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    920

    Question Bee space question for those who build their own

    I have always built my own boxes, bottoms, and tops. Since the last time I built boxes, I've learned that because of SHB, frame rests are no longer being used. The plans that I've always used specify that there is a 1/8" allowance for frame rests built into the design. So now I am wondering if I should lessen the rabbet for the frames by that 1/8"? But if I do that, am I going to upset the bee space of the box design--will I have 1/8" too much space between my boxes?

    How do folks handle this? Or is it even anything to worry about? Thanks for any and all input!



    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Jackson, MO
    Posts
    591

    Default Re: Bee space question for those who build their own

    I don't know. I am using a plan my mentor has used for many years. 3/8" from inside of the box, 5/8" down from the top. No frame rests in his design.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Palermo, Maine, USA
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: Bee space question for those who build their own

    I do the same as jdmidwest.
    Like us on facebook This is the place to bee!
    Ralph

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    688

    Default Re: Bee space question for those who build their own

    Rabbet should be 5/8 deep. Top bar of frame is 3/8. You then have 1/4 between top of frames and top of super. This is just room for bees when you slide a super into position to not crush the bees. Make all supers the same.

    Deep supers when fully dry should be 9 1/2. With a 9 1/8 deep frame, bee space of 3/8 is maintained between frames in one super to the next.
    Last edited by mgolden; 01-20-2013 at 06:46 PM. Reason: Fully dry is 9 1/2
    If you always do what you always did, you'll always get what you always got!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    920

    Default Re: Bee space question for those who build their own

    THANK YOU! Looks like I am good to go without having to change a thing!




    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Evansville, IN
    Posts
    2,505

    Default Re: Bee space question for those who build their own

    Old style boxes had a 7/8" rabbet and a folded metal frame rest, so the frame actually sat on a ledge 5/8" from the top of the box. The new style has a 5/8" rabbet and a flat (or no) frame rest. Nothing else changed.

    The typical box configuration is to have 1/4" space above the frames and 1/8" space below the frames, so they end up 3/8" apart. You don't want to get too small, certainly, as the bees tend to propolize spaces less than 1/4" and getting the boxes apart without ripping the bottom bars off the frames will be difficult. Too wide, they make burr comb, but that's much less of a problem if you inspect regularly keep the burr comb cleaned up. Fresh white comb isn't very tough.

    There was a very complete survey posted a couple months ago about which frames and boxes from all the major sellers fit together. Quite a few violate bee space in combination, it's something to watch for.

    Peter

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, Sullivan, Tennessee
    Posts
    787

    Default Re: Bee space question for those who build their own

    Some manufacturers make their boxes with the beespace at the top while others make it at the bottom. Some split the difference, which is what I like. Whichever way you choose it OK, just try to avoid mixing the various types in a single colony. -js

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Walker, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    920

    Default Re: Bee space question for those who build their own

    I'm using a box of frames from Dadant I bought in 2005 and it does appear that if I go with fresh, kiln-dried lumber, I will not have to change my plans at all. I had toyed with the idea of using some lumber I've had on hand for awhile, but once I looked closely I realized that some of it had warped, so I am off to the local lumber yard for new boards. Since I'm gonna do this, I might as well do it right!

    Thanks for all the help!

    Rusty
    Rusty Hills Farm -- home of AQHA A Rusty Zipper & Rusty's Bees ( LC and T)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads