Results 1 to 11 of 11

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    Posts
    41

    Default brain hurts from too much input!

    The past three or four days I've been cramming for upcoming spring and my first bee hive...so much cramming that the wife is getting upset.

    My plans are to till up my yard and reseed it with new grass and several different types of flowers. What I'm wondering is if I reseed by mid March to early April, will my new flowers have time to help my new hive at all?

    I'm still working on the list, but so far I would like to plant three different types of Echium, white and possibly red clover, and sunflowers.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Solano, California, USA
    Posts
    1,256

    Default Re: brain hurts from too much input!

    Quote Originally Posted by gunho23 View Post
    The past three or four days I've been cramming for upcoming spring and my first bee hive...so much cramming that the wife is getting upset.

    My plans are to till up my yard and reseed it with new grass and several different types of flowers. What I'm wondering is if I reseed by mid March to early April, will my new flowers have time to help my new hive at all?

    I'm still working on the list, but so far I would like to plant three different types of Echium, white and possibly red clover, and sunflowers.


    Unless you have 500 acres you can forget about planting for bees. Yes every little bit helps but the effort required will produce such a minimal return you might as well forget it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,820

    Default Re: brain hurts from too much input!

    If you are planning to get rid of your lawn and put in flowers for bees, go for it. It will give you immense satisfaction seeing the bees working on the blossoms. I would seed heavily with white dutch clover, you can cut it if the wife gets tired of the unkept look and it will still send up new blooms all season, does need some water now and then though to really do well. John

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Scott, Arkansas, USA
    Posts
    148

    Default Re: brain hurts from too much input!

    You dont have to replant just let the henbit take over like it has in my yard. The bees seem to work when it is blooming.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    Posts
    41

    Default Re: brain hurts from too much input!

    Thanks for the input.

    I wouldn't reseed except my yard is full of weeds that don't flower and grow 5 feet tall. I want to plant new grass and thought I might as well throw something in the mix for the bees.

    Ball clover and white clover mixed with some grass seed is what I'm looking at now.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Grosse Ile, Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,820

    Default Re: brain hurts from too much input!

    gunho23, you can't go wrong with white lawn clover, its one of the better honey plants there is, like I said it does need some water or it will burn up if you have hot dry weather for too long. Not too many really good honey plants that like it very dry, don't know what your summers are like down there, but I know yellow and white sweet clover can handle alot of dryness but they get 5 feet tall and don't bloom till second year, then die. John

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Central Arkansas
    Posts
    41

    Default Re: brain hurts from too much input!

    Quote Originally Posted by jmgi View Post
    gunho23, you can't go wrong with white lawn clover, its one of the better honey plants there is, like I said it does need some water or it will burn up if you have hot dry weather for too long. Not too many really good honey plants that like it very dry, don't know what your summers are like down there, but I know yellow and white sweet clover can handle alot of dryness but they get 5 feet tall and don't bloom till second year, then die. John
    Thanks for the info.

    Our summers are usually between 90-110 degrees late June through late August, high humidity, very little rain....last summer we had no rain...bad drought and we are on a well system so I can't water a whole lot without running out of water.

    I agree with your point on white clover, and unfortunately it does not bloom year one....that is why I am contemplating mixing the seed with ball clover as it looks like white clover and blooms the first year, but is only an annual.

    Eric

  8. #8

    Default Re: brain hurts from too much input!

    Here is a handy link. Find your location, put in a 2-mile radius, and then you can see where your bees will be foraging.

    http://www.freemaptools.com/radius-around-point.htm
    Greg Whitehead, Ten Mile, TN
    Blog - http://gregsbees.blogspot.com/

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads