Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 46

Thread: mite out break

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Citrus County, Florida, United States
    Posts
    258

    Default Re: mite out break

    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    Be very careful. Queenless splits in July in Florida strikes me as a recipe for small hive beetle mayhem.
    SHB are certainly an issue, but splitting strongest hives seems to do fine. Last year had good success with July splits. To me, it's more about dearth than beetles but I have no conflicts with feeding.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,836

    Default Re: mite out break

    Quote Originally Posted by sqkcrk View Post
    Daniel, whereas swarming my result in what appears to be an effective manner of addressing Varroa mite infestation, a colony of bees doesn't swarm because of Mite presence.
    Mark, I never said they swarm because of mites. that does not mean that swarming does not control mites. A single act can accomplish many things.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,277

    Default Re: mite out break

    since the lifespan of a female varroa mite is two to three months in the summer, and six to eight months in the winter, i'm not sure how brood breaks and swarms would offer too much in the way of mite control.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Reno, NV
    Posts
    2,836

    Default Re: mite out break

    I am not so sure I understand how it works. But I see people claiming it does all the time. I have seen information that indicates that crowding of the mites has a negative impact on their ability to reproduce. I can't recall where I saw that though.
    Stand for what you believe, even if you stand alone.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Citrus County, Florida, United States
    Posts
    258

    Default Re: mite out break

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    since the lifespan of a female varroa mite is two to three months in the summer, and six to eight months in the winter, i'm not sure how brood breaks and swarms would offer too much in the way of mite control.
    It would act similar to drone trapping, starving the mites of opportunity to lay. The total elimination of mites with splitting/swarming would not happen. Nothing different than many other methods including chemical, mites are knocked back to less critical levels. 2 reproductive cycles are achieved by female mites. Splitting/swarming might allow less mites a second chance as well as allowing for less viable male mites. http://www.users.globalnet.co.uk/~ms...destructor.pdf

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,277

    Default Re: mite out break

    >mites are knocked back...

    understood ncb, but so are the bees, and the net % infestation is what is important.

    i don't know if much is gained by brood breaks, but then i haven't seen any science on it either.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,212

    Default Re: mite out break

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Y View Post
    On the issue of swarming possibly being the way bees treat themselves for mites.

    Okay Daniel, let me put it this way. Bees don't treat themselves for mites.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Shoshone County, Idaho
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: mite out break

    Varroa mite numbers seemed to be higher this year than what I have seen in the past at least in this part of the country. Maybe that is what he was talking about??
    Hugus Creek Honey Farm: St. Maries, ID / Lewiston, ID
    Like us on Facebook

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,212

    Default Re: mite out break

    Have you or someone been gathering statistics from across your part of the country or are you going by what you see in your own hives?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,277

    Default Re: mite out break

    good evening mark. how's it going with your bees this winter?
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,212

    Default Re: mite out break

    Serious off topic question? Or, a message?

    THey're in good shape. Yours?
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,277

    Default Re: mite out break

    a little off topic i guess, sorry. glad to hear yours are fine.

    thankfully mine are in good shape too.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Newark, Ohio
    Posts
    115

    Default Re: mite out break

    So does anyone believe that if i keep down the path I am on that one day i can have surviving hives? Or is that all a big dream?

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Brasher Falls, NY, USA
    Posts
    26,212

    Default Re: mite out break

    Not sure, but probably not. Talk to Michael Palmer about "The Sustainable Apiary", how he keeps his apiary alive.
    Mark Berninghausen "That which works, persists."

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,277

    Default Re: mite out break

    depends who you listen to.

    i'm not sure i'm sold on the fact that genetic resistance can be counted on 100%, especially considering most queens are going to be open mated. even the strongest and most resistant bees are going to have a limit on how much they can take, and it is the strongest colonies that are most likely to rob the crashing ones.

    i can easily see how just one colony crashing with mites and getting robbed could easily spread the infestation like a domino effect to other colonies in the yard.

    as if the mites sucking the hemolymph out of the bees wasn't bad enough, if they are vectoring a very virulent virus as well it could mean the end of an otherwise healthy, productive, and for the most part resistant colony.

    plus, allowing mites to crash a colony and move on to another selects for those kind of mites that kill their host, instead of mites that are less virulent and don't crash a colony.

    i'll be the first to admit that counting mites has not been a part of my bee management. my bees have been doing fine and have not been treated for mites, and they are descended from bees that have never been treated.

    i had my first hive crash to mites this fall. luckily i caught it before it got robbed. there were so few bees and it was so late in the season that i just shook them out.

    i plan to use my alcohol jar a lot more going forward. in the spring, i'll want to know what the mite levels are to help me decide which colonies to graft new queens from and which colonies to pinch the queen from and use for splits and mating nucs. in the summer, after the honey harvest, i can requeen colonies with high mite counts or make up nucs to sell or overwinter.

    i am hopeful i can propagate my bees in this way and avoid treating for mites. i do think it is risky to not do mite counts and not have a plan in place to deal with a high infestation if you find it.

    beekeeping is not inexpensive and a involves a lot of sweat. letting hives crash costs money, time, and lost harvest. again, i'm not convinced just letting hives die out is the way to go.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  16. #36

    Default Re: mite out break

    Quote Originally Posted by squarepeg View Post
    they are descended from bees that have never been treated.
    Now...how do you know this?
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    jackson county, alabama, usa
    Posts
    4,277

    Default Re: mite out break

    i bought my bees from a supplier nearby, who has propagated them from feral bees he and his father cut out of the woods over ten years ago. he claims never using treatments of any kind, and he is a very trustworthy fellow.

    i guess it's possible the swarms that created those feral colonies may have been treated many years ago, but what i have are long term survivors. this is one reason i would rather not treat them if i can help it.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Richardson, TX, USA
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: mite out break

    Quote Originally Posted by BeeManiac View Post
    All i know is that ive lost 20 hives this year. All my Nucs are fine and the only ones ive lost are production hives. To this point my apairies have been all ferel stock. They usually fend off the mites. I dont know whats going on but im down to 49 hives and kinda frustrated about rebuilding in the spring. I did buy some queens last year but they are in the nucs. All of the dead out clusters have plenty of honey and just a fist full of bees frozen. They were all busting in the fall. It has to be varroa destructer.
    I just took down 4 hives that were dead and also had just a fist full of bees frozen. They were also some of the strongest hives in that yard. We were very late this year in getting cold weather and I haven't been opening up the hives in the cold weather. I am assuming that what happened is the hives swarmed not long before the first cold weather which was late December.

    I also haven't been monitoring the v.mite count in my hives and maybe its possible that a significant build up of v.mites caused a quick collapse.

  19. #39

    Default Re: mite out break

    Quote Originally Posted by RichardsonTX View Post
    I am assuming that what happened is the hives swarmed not long before the first cold weather which was late December.

    that a significant build up of v.mites caused a quick collapse.
    Which of these scenarios do you truly believe the most likely?
    Dan www.boogerhillbee.com
    Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Richardson, TX, USA
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: mite out break

    Quote Originally Posted by beemandan View Post
    Which of these scenarios do you truly believe the most likely?
    My lack of experience as a beekeeper keeps me from being able to make a good guess.

    However, I would not think that a hive would swarm that late in the year and it is probably from a v.mite buildup. After this year, my first full year, I don't think I'll ever go treatment free again (at least for all my hives). Maybe I'll take a few and experiment but I'll never manage my hives in a way that goes against the majority opinion.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Ads