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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Bristow, VA
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Cedar construction

    Thanks again for all the suggestions/recommendations. I do enjoy woodworking and the beehive may look nice; however, i am more concerned with it's function.

    During construction, i believe i have a design flaw. I built the front/back taller on both ends and the bars sit snug between them. I have cut several cleats of various sizes for each end to allow a bee space as the bars expand. I am concerned about the front/back with expansion of the top bars. The bars are made of pine (Cedar expands much more) and wood expands across the grain, ie; the width of the bars. I think i will need to trim the back of the hive down to be level with the bottom of the top bars. Or should i just loosley place the bars in (smaller than a beespace between each) Here is an update photo. Any comments or constructive criticism welcome. I think i hijacked my own thread...beehive.jpg

  2. #22
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Roanoke, VA
    Posts
    1,497

    Default Re: Cedar construction

    Yes, you will get expansion, even with the pine. If you have follower boards and don't have bars clean to the very end you won't have a problem, just leave one out. I made what I call expansion bars for some top bar swarm traps that I'm putting out this spring. Basically just some very thin followers that will go in at the back and are more wedged shaped. I'm needing to do this as once the traps are out they will be unattended and I won't be able to tweek them easily. I'm hoping that if I get some expansion these will compress before pushing the ends of the hive apart.

    You could still cut the ends of the hive flush at this point, but you will want something at the end (like a cleat) that will give you bee space at the front of the hive. You could just use a spacer that hangs down a bit to keep them from building on it, kind of like a short, thin follower board.

    You could also install a slotted cleat at the rear of the hive that will allow for expansion, but that will be overkill. These are supposed to be simple hives after all!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Mercer County, Kentucky, USA
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: Cedar construction

    "The physical properties of [eastern] redcedar wood are excellent for many uses. The wood is moderately low in strength and stiffness but high in shock resistance. It shrinks very little during drying and is not greatly affected by changes in atmospheric moisture."

    Eastern Redcedar - Forest Products Laboratory
    http://www.fpl.fs.fed.us/documnts/us...d/260eredc.pdf

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    St. Louis, Missouri, USA
    Posts
    626

    Default Re: Cedar construction

    The hive that I purchased came with a bunch of 1/8 x 3/8 x 17 1/2 spacers. You put them in alone, or double, or flat depending on how much space you need to take up. I would leave the ends tall, have enough bars to fit nicely now, and add the spacers when/where you need them. They are handy for when the comb has been drawn to one side and you want to get them back on track, or if they make a thicker honey comb and you need more space on both sides of it, etc.

    Your hive is looking great! It reminds me I need to get the router out and put my observation window in my new hive before spring!

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Nehawka, Nebraska USA
    Posts
    46,212

    Default Re: Cedar construction

    When I have scrap cedar I use it. I never buy cedar to build hives. It's not worth the difference in the cost and it splits more easily.
    Michael Bush bushfarms.com/bees.htm "Everything works if you let it." ThePracticalBeekeeper.com 40y 200h 37yTF

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