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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Columbia, Maryland. U.S.A.
    Posts
    252

    Default New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    Pick your medium of choice, (TB, frame) hot melt glue 2-3 bamboo skewers down each side, u now have a u when inverted , slide comb between skewers against TB/Frame, pull free ends of skewers together to grab comb and secure with twist tie, once fully attached by B's the skewers are easily removed. Will report results.
    Cheers,
    Drew

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Palermo, Maine, USA
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    I am not sure I understand what you are saying.

    Are you suggesting the use of glued on wooden pieces instead of elastic bands or string to attach comb to a frame? Wouldn't you need to remove the bottom bar?

    What do you see as the advantage of this method?
    Like us on facebook This is the place to bee!
    Ralph

  3. #3

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    I love my hinge frames. Cut comb put in frame close put in box
    David

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,033

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    Does the brood have to be mounted in a frame? I was thinking you could just have a box with spokes coming out of the bottom board and stand the comb between the spokes. If this box is on the bottom and another box with empty frames in it on top you could wait three weeks or less and all the brood would be out. Then replace it with another box of empty frames. Crush and strain any honey in the original comb or let them rob it out.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chesterfield, NH
    Posts
    480

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    Does the brood have to be mounted in a frame? I was thinking you could just have a box with spokes coming out of the bottom board and stand the comb between the spokes. If this box is on the bottom and another box with empty frames in it on top you could wait three weeks or less and all the brood would be out. Then replace it with another box of empty frames. Crush and strain any honey in the original comb or let them rob it out.

    Not me




    BEE HAPPY Jim 134
    Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA.
    http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Palermo, Maine, USA
    Posts
    731

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    I guess that your suggestion would work Ace, but it seem to me that it would be simpler to just secure the comb in a frame, place it in a hive and be done with it.

    What advantage is there in doing it the way that you have suggested?
    Like us on facebook This is the place to bee!
    Ralph

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Columbia, Maryland. U.S.A.
    Posts
    252

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    I'll make one up with old comb and post a pic
    Dave, I did'nt see your hinge frame but think I know what you've got , Yes even better but harder to construct

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,033

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    Quote Originally Posted by ralittlefield View Post
    What advantage is there in doing it the way that you have suggested?
    1 I think it would be quicker and less of a mess at the time of the cut out. (don't know)
    2. Not knowing the age of the natural comb and what it has been exposed to I would want it out of my hive as soon as possible. Personal preference.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Columbia, Maryland. U.S.A.
    Posts
    252

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    Ace, concur on both points but more trouble for B's to start from scratch overhead, heat brood below both

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,033

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    I wasn't thinking scratch I was thinking empty drawn comb above.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chesterfield, NH
    Posts
    480

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    Quote Originally Posted by Acebird View Post
    1 I think it would be quicker and less of a mess at the time of the cut out. (don't know)
    2. Not knowing the age of the natural comb and what it has been exposed to I would want it out of my hive as soon as possible. Personal preference.
    IMHO
    1. Make the mess only 1 time and bee none
    2. Not knowing the age of the natural comb I would rotate it out
    3.I do not know what the bees are being exposed to (2 Mi.) around the hives at home or in a tree,or etc.




    BEE HAPPY Jim 134
    Franklin County Beekeepers Association MA.
    http://www.franklinmabeekeepers.org/

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    DFW area, TX, USA
    Posts
    1,016

    Thumbs Up Best way to speed things is to have more hands ;)

    Its hard to beat mounting the honeycomb in a frame from your equipment and securing it with a rubber band or wire.....Its messy and temporary, but it serves the purpose to anchor the bees to their brood in your hive. You can cut out the wild comb at a later time.


    Backup 030.jpg
    These combs are mounted up-side-down in the frames, I mount them right side up when I'm working by myself. Many use rubber bands. The advantage of the wire is that you can have a better approximation of the center of the frame by bending the wire to hold the comb toward the center of the frame. Rubber bands don't do that. Less interference between frames is safer for the bees when you remove the frames to inspect later -comb interference kills bees, sometimes the queen.
    Backup 022.jpg
    This colony was 25' up in a pecan tree. The homeowner noticed comb on the grass, looked up, and this is what she saw. Note the queen cells, the queen was lost on the fallen combs.

    Backup 024.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images
    LeeB
    I try to learn from my mistakes, and from yours when you give me a heads up :)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Kalamazoo,MI
    Posts
    325

    Default Re: Best way to speed things is to have more hands ;)

    Ha Ha, whats the suitcase for in pic 3?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Utica, NY
    Posts
    9,033

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim 134 View Post
    3.I do not know what the bees are being exposed to (2 Mi.) around the hives at home or in a tree,or etc.
    Is it not true with a lot of cut outs that the home owner has tried poisons to rid their house of pests?

    Lee it looks like what you are working on is mostly empty comb.
    With exposed comb like that it had to be warm enough in the season so the brood didn't need to be covered. Also the appearance of capped queen cells makes me think that some hives could be had by just setting up swarm traps had this colony been left alone.
    Brian Cardinal
    Zone 5a, Practicing non-intervention beekeeping

  15. #15
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    1,379

    Default Re: Best way to speed things is to have more hands ;)

    I like the idea of nailing string to one side of the frame, laying the comb in the frame and then stringing the other side of the frame when the frame is full of cut out comb!
    Coyote Creek Bees

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Kingsport, Sullivan, Tennessee
    Posts
    780

    Default Re: Best way to speed things is to have more hands ;)

    Lburou- Why do you mount the cutout combs upside down? -js

  17. #17
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Livermore, CA
    Posts
    1,379

    Default Re: Best way to speed things is to have more hands ;)

    Quote Originally Posted by dixiebooks View Post
    Lburou- Why do you mount the cutout combs upside down? -js
    Maybe so when the brood hatches the bees will abandon the comb since they cannot store nectar in them because the cells are pointing down, and I don't believe the queen will lay in them either. Then he can cycle out the comb that could contain unknown contaminants.
    Coyote Creek Bees

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Columbia, Maryland. U.S.A.
    Posts
    252

    Default Re: Best way to speed things is to have more hands ;)

    important considerations for me are being able to secure comb(w/ B's) to frame/TB with 2 hands while @ top of 30'ladder, @ 2am, working under red light over and hour since last cafe latte, woozy from venom, shall I contiue ....Go Ravens & Redskins !

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Springfield, MO, USA
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: Best way to speed things is to have more hands ;)

    Maryland,

    I do 20-30 cut outs a year and haven't had to put myself in that situation before. What caused you to have to work from the top of a ladder? or at night? That must have been a nightmare!
    Jeffrey Maddox
    www.MaddoxBees.com

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Springfield, MO, USA
    Posts
    102

    Default Re: New (to me anyway) idea on framing cutouts faster

    The idea of using bamboo skewers is innovative though. How about using bamboo lath instead? More flexibility and more support...
    Jeffrey Maddox
    www.MaddoxBees.com

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