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Thread: treating mites

  1. #1
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    Default treating mites

    I see all these talks about using oxlic acid, grease patties, powder sugar to treat mites on Honey bees. All these are great I am sure but not if you dont know how to use any of them. Can you guys give me references on where to go look these different styles up and also let me know what works best for you. Explain how to use what you talking about as most new bee keepers dont have a clue what your talking about.,

  2. #2
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    Dec 2012
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    Lexington, Kentucky
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    Default Re: treating mites

    Powder sugar is simple, sprinkle on bees in the early and late stages of the season. Beekeeping for dummies second I got it last night, read the whole thing. Pretty good stuff.

  3. #3
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    jackson co. al.
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    Default Re: treating mites

    you ask 10 beeks same question an you'al get 12 differant answers what works for you

  4. #4
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    Default Re: treating mites

    I'd probably start right here in the forum and do some searches. For instance, if you wanted to treat with oxalic acid then do a search on that. You'll quickly find a couple of different approaches. Decide on the approach that you might want to learn more about and do a more specific search. If it really intrigues you, post a specific question. That will help reduce the overly broad answers that we get when we post overly broad questions!

    Here's a search link dealing with how to apply powdered sugar. It's a good search because it deals with the specific question (how to apply powdered sugar), the search function of the board and it includes outside links and opinions.

    http://www.beesource.com/forums/show...powdered+sugar

    Hope this helps!
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  5. #5
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    Default Re: treating mites


  6. #6
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    Default Re: treating mites

    Hasn't sugar dusting been debunked a little or is it still thought of as effective?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: treating mites

    Quote Originally Posted by JRG13 View Post
    Hasn't sugar dusting been debunked a little or is it still thought of as effective?
    Some swear by it but it sure hasn't worked for me.
    President, San Francisco Beekeepers Association
    www.habitatforhoneybees.org

  8. #8
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    Default Re: treating mites

    Quote Originally Posted by JRG13 View Post
    Hasn't sugar dusting been debunked a little or is it still thought of as effective?
    There is an article in this months Bee Culture that recommends not relying on sugar dusting to control mites.
    Like us on facebook This is the place to bee!
    Ralph

  9. #9
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    Default Re: treating mites

    I still believe that there is no single solution to mites. Just as there is single solution to prevent getting the flu. You can't just wash your hands a lot and stay healthy. Some of us do that, others get a flu shot, many of us eat well and stay otherwise healthy, some avoid contact with sick individuals, etc. Practicing all of these measures and more is likely to increase the odds of staying healthy and avoiding the flu. Integrated pest management tackles the problem of mites using multiple approaches. Certainly, a heavily infested colony is not apt to be cured by only sugar dusting but if it's part of an integrated approach the odds go up to keep the effects of mites on the low side. The same can be said of any other single approach. In my opinion the only true, single approach to dealing with mites is letting the bees develop a natural resistance. As beekeepers we don't do that so that natural resistance is a long time coming. In the meantime we treat so I say, if you're going to treat then choose methods (plural) that over a season, offer the best chance of reaching your desired goal. If it was easy, we'd be all finished and there wouldn't be a thread here to view!
    "My wife always wanted girls. Just not thousands and thousands of them......"

  10. #10
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    Default Re: treating mites

    Quote Originally Posted by JRG13 View Post
    Hasn't sugar dusting been debunked a little or is it still thought of as effective?
    First of all it is only going to have much effect when the hive is broodless. The main issue to me, though, is no one has really explained to my satisfaction how ps dusting equates to actually killing mites. My experience shows it does knock down a lot of mites and when used with a sbb most will probably end up on the ground but research has shown that they can live several days without a host and they are very mobile little critters, so I am not sure what stops reinfestation.
    "People will generally accept facts as truth only if the facts agree with what they already believe."- Andy Rooney

  11. #11
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    Default Re: treating mites

    see current thread on fogging with mineral oil

  12. #12
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    Default Re: treating mites

    Quote Originally Posted by jim lyon View Post
    ...The main issue to me, though, is no one has really explained to my satisfaction how ps dusting equates to actually killing mites. ...
    Jim, I think "killing" can only be said when an oil tray is used beneath the SBB. Then, of course, when they fall off, they drown in the oil. I use them. I don't treat now, but I did, and when I sprinkled with ps, I sure got lots of them floating. But we do now know it does not help at all when they've sealed themselves up in the capped brood cells. I think most people are just trying to rid themselves of any that they can. It sure FEELS good to seem them dead and floating! Nasty suckers!
    Zone 7b ~ Central Arkansas
    8fr medium equipment

  13. #13
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    Default Re: treating mites

    i hope i'm not repeating myself too much on this, but this is where the brood break may come into play.

    waiting until all or at least most of the brood has emerged, removing the bottom board, and then dusting will hopefully dislodge most of the mites and let them fall to the ground.

    this means pulling or pinching the queen and letting the brood hatch, or waiting until they stop brooding in the fall (which would probably be way too late to do any good)

    here's my plan (subject to modification based on expert advice received on this forum )

    if i find a high count in the spring, that colony gets dequeened, brood is allowed to emerge, the frames are dusted and split up for nucs. (sacrificing honey production for bee production)

    if i find a high count mid to late summer, the queen gets pinched, the brood is allowed to hatch, they get dusted, and are then combined with a strong nuc.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

  14. #14
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    Default Re: treating mites

    May take several seasons to reveal the efficacy of that plan of attack, but it is logical. You are pulling a queen that obviously doesn't have hygienic traits. I suppose the question is, what are you replacing her with? If you allow them to raise their own, are you continuing to propagate the un-hygienic traits? May necessitate buying hygienic bloodline.
    Zone 7b ~ Central Arkansas
    8fr medium equipment

  15. #15
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    Default Re: treating mites

    exactly seymore. these colonies would not be allowed to raise another queen, but the nucs made from them will be requeened with grafts from the best colonies. (low mites, strong build up, good production, good temperment).

    in addition, i'll have a drone frame in each colony so that i can cull drones from those with high mite counts, thereby getting rid of a lot of mites in the capped drone, as well as not letting those genetics propagate.

    i am also lucky to have a lot of wild bees around, that will hopefully be introducing 'survivor' genes via their drones mating with my queens.

    bringing in other bloodlines is not out of the question, but i would want to get them from stock that is adapted to my area.
    journaling the growth of a treatment free apiary started in 2010. 20+/- hives

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